British bombs on Syria will help ISIS


This video from #SyrianGirl says about itself:

The only way to defeat ISIS is to stop US support of ISIS by proxies Turkey, Qatar, Saudi Arabia. Not by bombing the country more.

The British Cameron government wanted to start a war on the Syrian government in 2013. A war in which they would have been allies of ISIS and Al-Qaeda. The peace movement managed to stop that plan then.

Now, they have again plans to bomb Syria. Officially, against ISIS this time. But as part of a coalition which includes countries serving as ideological inspiration for ISIS cruelty; and from which money is still flowing to ISIS. And a coalition which in practice still includes Al-Qaeda.

By Paddy McGuffin in Britain:

New bid to bomb Syria

Friday 3rd July 2015

As Defence Secretary Fallon pushes for more air strikes, campaigners warn of untold misery for people in the Middle East

ANTI-WAR campaigners challenged Defence Secretary Michael Fallon yesterday following his call for more air strikes in Syria and warned that the action could fuel potential Isis recruits.

Mr Fallon argued it was “illogical” that British planes were able to hit extremists in Iraq but not bases across the border and suggested any evidence that last week’s massacre in Tunisia was planned in Syria would show that the Islamic State leadership in the country represented a direct threat to the British people.

No Mr Fallon, that horrible massacre in Tunisia was not planned in Syria. It was planned in Libya. It was planned in the ‘new’ ‘free ‘Libya; created by David Cameron and his pals Nicolas Sarkozy and Silvio Berlusconi with their ‘humanitarian’ war for oil.

When the PM obtained Commons approval for the bombing of militant positions last year, he made it clear that this was limited to Iraq.

However Mr Fallon quoted David Cameron who said in September during the debate on taking action in Iraq that there was a “strong case” for Britain to do more in Syria.

He confirmed the government would seek Commons approval before conducting air strikes there. But he added: “The exception, as the house knows, is if there was a critical British national interest at stake or the need to act to prevent humanitarian catastrophe.”

Labour strongly indicated that it would back the government’s proposal with shadow defence secretary Vernon Coaker saying that Labour stood “ready to work with the government to defeat Isis” and would “carefully consider” any proposals that the government decides to bring forward.

“We all need to be clear about what difference any action would make to our objective of defeating Isis, about the nature of any action, its objectives and indeed its legal basis.

“Any potential action must command the support of other nations in the region, including Iraq and the coalition already taking action in Syria.”

Acting Labour leader Harriet Harman also appeared to imply the party could support the proposal saying that the situation was different to that in 2013.

But a Stop the War spokesman warned against military action as it’s action that has led to more people joining Isis. He said: “The US is already bombing Syria as well as Iraq, with little success. Many argue that this bombing has helped Isis recruit. “The proposal is in response to the terrible attack in Tunisia last week, but will do nothing to stop further attacks. Support for Isis in Tunisia has grown in the past two years, largely as a result of the growth of terrorism in neighbouring Libya. That in turn dates from the British and French-led bombing of Libya in 2011 which has created a state of civil war, terrorism and misery for its people.”

Campaign Against Nuclear Disarmament general secretary Kate Hudson said that US and British military action in the Middle East and North Africa had been “ill-conceived, leading to death and destruction for innocent civilians, and shattered states — both of which were abandoned by their attackers — where terrorists including Isis have since been able to organise.

We bombed Isis into existence. We can’t bomb them out of existence.”

Druze angry about Israeli government help for jihadists


This 16 June 2015 video shows a demonstration by Druze in the Israeli occupied Golan heights, against the al-Nusra Front (al-Qaeda in Syria). The demonstrators carry colourful Druze flags and Syrian flags.

By Daniella Cheslow:

Israeli Druze angered by their country’s medical assistance to Syrian rebels

June 24, 2015 Updated 2 hours ago

MAJDAL SHAMS, Golan Heights — Mira Amer, 50, was sleeping Tuesday before dawn in the Druze village of Majdal Shams in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights when police raided her home and arrested her son on suspicion of lynching a wounded Syrian who was on his way to an Israeli hospital.

Amer said her son, a 32-year-old musician, is not guilty – but that in any case the killing on Monday was not a murder. Druze in Israel are outraged that Israel may be giving medical care to Islamic militants fighting in Syria who’ve been accused of killing Druze in that country’s brutal conflict. Over the past two years, Israel has treated more than 1,600 wounded Syrian rebels in its hospitals.

“We don’t want the government to bring those terrorists here,” Amer said.

Amer – whose name has been changed because of an Israeli gag order on the case – has relatives in the Druze town of Hader on the Syrian side of the border, a town so close she can see it across the border. Islamist rebels from al Qaida’s Syrian affiliate, the Nusra Front, had surrounded Hader last week, just days after members of the movement had slaughtered 20 Druze in the Syrian province of Idlib.

“We all have relatives in Hader and they are getting hurt,” Amer said. …

The Druze sect is a 10th century offshoot of Shiite Islam whose members live in Syria, Lebanon, Israel and Jordan. In each nation, the Druze swear allegiance to the government and serve in its army. Nearly all of the men among the 110,000 Druze citizens of Israel do military service.

An additional 20,000 Druze live in the Golan Heights, which Israel captured from Syria in 1967; Druze in the Golan largely maintain Syrian citizenship in protest of Israeli rule and feel an umbilical connection to those who remain on the other side.

The crumbling of President Bashar Assad’s government has left the Druze in Syria vulnerable to attacks from Islamists, who see Druze as both heretics and enemy soldiers.

That’s galvanized the Druze inside Israel.

In Majdal Shams, residents poured into the streets last week flying the rainbow Druze flag and the red, white and green standard of Syria, along with banners bearing Assad’s face. Druze citizens of Israel raised $2.6 million, which they hoped would fund weapons for their Syrian counterparts. Ayoob Kara, a Druze legislator with Netanyahu’s Likud party, visited Jordan and Turkey to negotiate safe passage for Druze in Syria and made a personal appeal to the Israeli premier to help his people.

“The Druze in Israel who fought for Israel expect their state to help their brothers,” Kara told McClatchy.

Israel has sworn it will not allow a Druze genocide, but it has provided few specifics on how it will help.

British government deporting Syrian feminist to death in Saudi Arabia?


This January 2015 video is called Woman Beheaded in the Middle of the Road in Saudi Arabia.

By Peter Lazenby in Britain:

Syrian women’s rights campaigner faces deportation and certain death

Saturday 20th June 2015

A SYRIAN refugee living in Leeds faces deportation to Saudi Arabia where she faces almost certain death, campaigners said yesterday.

Raja Khouja, a women’s rights campaigner, is detained at the notorious Yarl’s Wood detention centre in Bedfordshire and is threatened with removal to Saudi Arabia on Thursday next week, June 25.

Ms Khouja’s criticism of women’s rights abuses in Saudi Arabia has sparked email and phone threats of death, imprisonment and mutilation — including for her limbs to be severed — if she goes to Saudi Arabia.

She has lived in Leeds with her Saudi husband Mahmoud Alhassan for four years.

Their asylum request is backed by Leeds-based Positive Action for Refugees and Asylum Seekers.

A spokesman for the group, who has launched a petition against her removal, said she will be in “extreme danger” if she is deported.

“They are much loved and respected by her community of friends here in Leeds and we are gravely concerned for her safety were she to be removed to Saudi Arabia,” they said.

ISIS’ war in Syria, helped by Western governments


This video from London, England says about itself:

UK: Kurds hurl eggs at Turkish embassy during anti-ISIS demo

22 September 2014

Approximately a dozen Kurdish protesters rallied outside the Turkish embassy in London, with some hurling eggs at the building and being carried off by police during the protest against the advancement of the Islamic State (IS) into the Kurdish town of Kobane, Monday.

During the demo, protesters chanted ‘Stop Supporting ISIS‘ and waved a banner ‘Hands off Kobane.’

By Ian Sinclair in Britain:

HAWK’S LIE: How the West backed Isis in Syria’s war

Thursday 18th June 2015

READING radical alternative news and commentary about Western foreign policy often leads to intense self-doubt and to questions like “why isn’t anyone else talking about this?”, “am I reading this right?” and even “perhaps I am losing my mind?”

Two recent news reports about the US involvement in Syria have triggered these exact questions for me.

Last month a formerly classified August 2012 Defence Intelligence Agency (DIA) report was published by the right-wing watchdog Judicial Watch.

In the heavily redacted document the DIA — the intelligence arm of the US Department of Defence — notes that “the Salafist, the Muslim Brotherhood, and AQI (al-Qaida in Iraq) are the major forces driving the insurgency in Syria.”

The next sentence in the report is this: “The West, Gulf countries and Turkey support the opposition, while Russia, China and Iran support the (Bashar al-Assad) regime.”

Later, the DIA makes another extraordinary statement: “There is the possibility of (the opposition) establishing a declared or undeclared Salafist Principality in Eastern Syria (…) and this is exactly what the supporting powers to the opposition want, in order to isolate the Syrian regime.”

Charles Lister, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Doha Centre and arguably the leading expert on the Syrian insurgency, provided the second jaw-dropping reading experience in May 2015. “The US-led operations room in southern Turkey, which co-ordinates the provision of lethal and non-lethal support to vetted opposition groups (…) specifically encouraged a closer co-operation with Islamists commanding frontline operations,” including with official al-Qaida branch Jabhat al-Nusra, Lister explained in Foreign Policy magazine.

So, to summarise, the West — the US and likely Britain too — was supporting Syria’s armed insurgency in 2012 in the full knowledge it was dominated by Salafists, the Muslim Brotherhood and al-Qaida in Iraq. Three years later the US is encouraging rebel groups to co-operate with al-Qaida’s branch in Syria.

What happened, you might well ask, to the epic generational struggle against al-Qaida and radical jihadists that we have been fighting since 2001 to save Western civilisation? A war and evil enemy, lest we forget, that has been repeatedly hyped up by a pliant media and supported by all the main political parties in the US and Britain.

Except for Seumas Milne in the Guardian, the mainstream media has ignored the extraordinary revelations of the DIA and Lister. The BBC has, as far as I’m aware, not mentioned either on any of its many news platforms.

Incredibly, the highly respected Middle East specialist Shadi Hamid describes the Obama administration as “opting to remain disengaged in Syria”.

In addition to this explosive new evidence of Western support for jihadists, the West’s key allies in the region have also been supporting the more extreme elements of the resistance to the Syrian government.

In August 2014 the Washington Post reported that before their blitz in Iraq, “Turkey rolled out the red carpet” to Islamic State, eager to aid any enemy of the Assad government. “Wounded jihadists from the Islamic State and the al-Nusra Front (…) were treated at Turkish hospitals,” the Post noted. “Most important, the Turks winked as (…) Turkish towns became way stations for moving foreign fighters and arms across the border.”

The Wall Street Journal carried a similar report in March this year, except this time it concerned Israel and how some of the al-Nusra Front’s “severely wounded fighters are regularly taken across the frontier fence to receive treatment in Israeli hospitals.”

Unsurprisingly, on this issue the Western media invariably report the official US government line that the US is opposed to these actions and is putting pressure on Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Qatar to stop supporting jihadists in Syria.

However, a close reading of mainstream news reports suggests that far from being opposed, the US is deeply involved in these nefarious networks. For example, earlier this year the Wall Street Journal published a story with the headline Saudis Agree to Provide Syrian Rebels With Mobile Anti-aircraft Missiles.

According to the report, “rebel leaders say they met with US and Saudi intelligence agents, among others, in Jordan on Jan. 30 (…) That is when wealthy Gulf States offered the more sophisticated weapons (anti-aircraft missiles).”

Writing about increased co-ordinated support to the Syrian rebels provided by Saudi Arabia and Turkey, the Guardian’s Martin Chulov recently noted the Saudi king told allies “the US would not stand in the way.”

And in June 2013 the Los Angeles Times noted that arms shipments from Qatar, Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries to Syrian rebels were “provided with assent from the US.”

Public denials at odds with covert actions are, of course, meat and potatoes when it comes to outsourcing foreign policy to regional proxies. “We’ll continue saying the bombs are ours, not yours,” the US-supported Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh told US General David Petraeus in January 2010 about US drone strikes in his country.

According to the Washington Post, a similar deception has long been in effect between the US and Pakistan, with the Pakistani government publicly condemning US drone strikes, while at the same time secretly co-operating with the US.

And of course, if the US really felt about its Middle East allies as they publicly claim to, a simple way to pressure them to stop supporting jihadis in Syria would be for the US to threaten to stop selling its allies arms.

In reality, the US continues to arm countries such as Qatar and Saudi Arabia despite — or perhaps because of — their support for the Syrian insurgency. In March 2015 the Stockholm Peace Research Institute noted that the Gulf Co-operation Council states and Turkey are “scheduled to receive further large order of major arms in the coming years” — mainly from the US and Europe.

It’s certainly possible I’m not reading the evidence correctly. I may be taking it out of context. There may well be good reasons why the media has chosen not to cover the story, and I could well have lost my mind. But what if the reports point to a far more frightening conclusion — that it is the Western media and political elite is mad and delusional?

Ian Sinclair is the author of The March That Shook Blair: An Oral History of February 15 2003, published by Peace News Press. He tweets from @IanJSinclair.

Turkish and Jordanian military forces, including tens of thousands of ground troops, are preparing to invade Syria, with the aim of establishing militarized buffer zones in the northern and southern areas of the country, according to media reports Tuesday: here.

British ex-jihadi recruiter denounces ISIS, al-Qaeda


Abu Muntasir in Deeyah Khan’s television documentary: 'If people want to call me a coward, fine – I’m a coward.' Photograph: ITV

From weekly The Observer in Britain:

‘Recruiter’ of UK jihadis: I regret opening the way to Isis

Abu Muntasir sobs on TV documentary as he tells of raising funds and recruiting fighters before turning his back on violence

Tracy McVeigh

Saturday 13 June 2015 22.03 BST

The “godfather” of the British jihadi movement, who recruited dozens of young men to fight in foreign wars, has said he now regrets opening the way for people to join terror groups such as Islamic State and al-Qaida.

Abu Muntasir, 55, who lives in Suffolk, was one of the first influential propagandists in the UK for a radical Islamist message. Active in the 1980s and 1990s, he helped to radicalise “thousands” of young Muslims, encouraging many of them to travel to fight in wars in Afghanistan, Kashmir, Burma, Bosnia and Chechnya.

Among the first to invite speakers to the UK from abroad who preached violence and hatred to disaffected Muslims, he distributed speeches from hate preachers Ali al-Timimi, now serving a life sentence in the US for inciting terrorism, and the late Anwar al-Awlaki, who was killed in a controversial CIA drone attack in Yemen that also left his children dead.

In a documentary by Emmy-winning film-maker Deeyah Khan to be shown on ITV this week, Muntasir and several former extremists speak of their deep regret at the decisions of hundreds of UK Muslims to travel to join Isis in Syria and Iraq, and of their efforts to educate young people away from the same paths they followed as angry young men.

Muntasir, who is seen sobbing in the film as he recounts the horrors of his own days on battlefields in Bosnia, Afghanistan and Burma, is described as one of the “founding fathers of western jihad” and admitted that he worked to “create the link and clear the paths. I came back [from war] and opened the door and the trickle turned to a flood. I inspired and recruited, I raised funds and bought weapons, not just a one-off but for 15 to 20 years. Why I have never been arrested I don’t know.”

A comment at the Observer site on this article says on this:

Good point. Why wasn’t he arrested? Has anyone from the security services been asked that question?

Maybe the answer is that at some stages, organisations like al-Qaeda were and are allies of secret services and armed forces of NATO countries.

The Observer article continues:

He said it was not until he realised, while fighting in the jungles of Burma with armed resistance groups, that what was going on was not a holy war, but nothing less than the butchery and exploitation of young Muslims, that he turned his back on violence. “If people want to call me a coward, fine – I’m a coward.”

Muntasir, founder and chief executive of Jimas, said it was time for people who supported Islamic extremism to ask why their sons and daughters were being blown up for false ideals in “unwinnable wars”. Hate, he said, is not what Islam or the prophet taught.

“It was a virus with which we infected a generation. Now it has proliferated,” said one of Muntasir’s former followers, Alyas Karmani, now a peace campaigner, youth worker and imam in Bradford. He said the psychology used by Isis to groom youngsters is similar to that which Muntasir used to bring in followers.

“He was a charismatic father figure. It was exciting and there was an energy. I was an activist, never an extremist. For me I always had an inner voice telling me that a lot of this is not right.

“But I was angry. I had a very violent dad. I had a lot of racism. I was angry and frustrated. So we planted this virus. And the kids today have caught it.

“It’s the same attraction then as it is for young people now. A range of factors that is the same for Muslims and non-Muslims. Young people want to change the world, to feel loved and have a sense of belonging, a sense of attachment. That might just be in a foreign field.”

Speaking to the Observer, Karmani said that to tackle the numbers of young people leaving the UK for Syria, Iraq and Libya, it was important that the debate should change to understanding the human elements at play.

“It’s not about ideals – 90% of them never subscribe to the ideals – it’s other factors that are a draw. This is the new rock and roll; jihad is sexy. The kid who was not very good-looking now looks good holding a gun. He can get a bride now, he’s powerful. The Isis gun is as much a penis extension as the stockbroker with his Ferrari.

“There is a fundamental disconnect with our young people. Youth work used to be a brilliant vehicle but that’s all gone in the cuts, so who connects with young people now?”

He said many first- and second-generation immigrants were forced to live double lives. “I do blame the parents. If their kids aren’t able to talk about what’s going on in their lives outside the house, that’s a massive problem.

“If they have to be repressed about sex, about their friendships, who are they going to talk to? It makes them exposed and vulnerable. We have to stop seeing Muslims as ‘other’. They’re not. See them as the same.”

In making the film, Khan, “born in the west to parents from the east” and forced to give up a singing career because of extremists’ threats to her and her family, said she had been shocked by many attitudes she found in talking to young people across the UK: “I was horrified to find so many people with backgrounds like mine turning to extremism.”

Exposure: Jihad – A British Story will be on ITV at 10.40pm on 15 June.

Why ISIS terrorism? Mark Fiore animated cartoon


This video from the USA says about itself:

Who Created ISIS?

8 June 2015

With the fall of Ramadi in Iraq and Palmyra in Syria, fingers are pointing faster than you can say “Preemptive War.” John McCain thinks the crazy Islamic extremists of ISIS wouldn’t be causing the world all this trouble if only Obama hadn’t spent so much time worrying about global warming. Jeb Bush says Al Qaeda in Iraq was wiped out and ISIS didn’t exist when his dear ol’ brother was president. You can read more here.

Al Qaeda massacre of Syrian Druze


This 2008 video is called The Druze Religion.

From daily The Morning Star in Britan:

Syria: Jihadists slaughter 30 Druze villagers

Friday 12th June 2015

SYRIAN anti-government militants linked to al-Qaida have massacred some 30 Druze villagers.

The killings happened on Wednesday in the Druze village of Qalb Lawzeh in the Jabal al-Summaq region after the Nusra Front tried to seize the home of a Druze government official.

The militants shot a villager dead, prompting another to grab one of the fighters’ rifles and kill a member of the jihadist group.

The Nusra Front group later returned with reinforcements and opened fire, killing dozens of residents.

Syrian news agency Sana said that 30 died in the “horrible massacre,” including five members of the same family, adding that the Nusra Front burned down several homes.

Lebanese Druze leader Sheikh Naim Hassan condemned the killings and said that efforts were being made to “contain this regrettable and painful incident.”

Syrian civil war: Jabhat al-Nusra’s massacre of Druze villagers shows the group is just as nasty as Isis. The incident last week suggests that the US have let the al-Qaeda affiliate off lightly: here.

Trial collapses after threatened exposure of UK backing of Syrian terror groups: here.