Saudi warplanes keep killing Yemeni civilians


This video says about itself:

‘We’re dying every day’: Yemeni civilians paint grim picture of suffering amid Saudi-led strikes

20 April 2015

RT gets eyewitness accounts of the dire humanitarian situation in Yemen as civilians bear the brunt of the Saudi-led airstrikes. Freelance journalist Muhammad al-Attab reports.

By Thomas Gaist:

Renewed Saudi-led bombardment kills, wounds dozens of Yemeni civilians

22 June 2015

Saudi-led airstrikes killed at least 15 and wounded scores more this weekend during attacks against targets in Marib, Saada, Lahj, Jawf and Aden, according to Yemeni media.

War planes under the Saudi-led Arab coalition also struck the Sanaa International Airport in Yemen’s capital over the weekend, and at least three civilians were killed Sunday by shelling of Aden’s Al Naqib hospital.

The latest fatalities add to the more than 3,000 civilians killed since the beginning of Operation Decisive Storm in late March. The real civilian death toll may be as high as 6-8,000 according to differing estimates.

At least 6 million Yemenis currently face starvation or near-starvation conditions, and at least 9 million lack reliable access to water, according to UN estimates released last week.

Saudi forces have continued to deploy illegal cluster munitions against targets in Yemen, according to evidence published by Human Rights Watch last week.

Saudi air force butchering Yemeni refugees, again


This video says about itself:

Yemen: Sanaa‘s children protest Saudi-led campaign outside UN building

13 April 2015

A group of Yemeni children gathered outside the United Nations (UN) office in Sanaa, Monday, to protest against the continued Saudi-led airstrikes on Yemen. One of the children, Al-Kassim ibn Hussain, condemned the Saudi [royal] family as “filthy and corrupt” … Despite the ongoing fighting, protester Kassam al-Gharah swore to continue to smile to show that “we are not a people of hate or animosity”.

After the earlier refugee killing by the Saudi royal air force … translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Saudi Arabia attacks refugees in Aden

Today, 15:07

Warplanes of the coalition led by Saudi Arabia have attacked a refugee convoy in Yemen. Dozens of people have been killed. Reports estimate from 23 to 31 deaths.

Two air strikes targeted vehicles, in which were many women and children who had fled the southern city of Aden. There is much fighting there.

The United Nations say already almost five thousand people have been killed.

Saudi monarchy keeps killing Yemeni children


This video says about itself:

Saudi-led strikes pound Yemen, dozens of women & children killed

5 June 2015

Saudi-led coalition warplanes are continuing to pound Houthi targets in Yemen despite the rebels agreeing to UN-backed peace talks. The strikes have killed 58 people across the country over the past two days, according to the Houthis. And the humanitarian situation is getting worse by the day, according to the UN humanitarian office, but the casualties are coming not only directly from the fighting – the collapse of the infrastructure also means critically ill patients are not receiving treatment.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Many children killed in war on Yemen

Today, 09:55

In the last ten weeks in Yemen more children have been killed than in all of 2014. This says the UNICEF representative in Yemen, Julien Harneis. Since the conflict in the country escalated in late March and the air strikes started by a coalition led by Saudi Arabia, already 279 children were killed and at least 402 children were injured.

The NOS report also says that the royal Saudi air force has escalated the war: for the first time, Mahweet province has been bombed.

Saudi monarchy destroys beautiful historic Yemeni homes


This video says about itself:

Old Sana’a, Yemen – Architecture

25 March 2008

The city of Sana’a is a living museum. Considered to be one of the oldest cities in the world (2,500+ years old), and Old Sana’a protected by UNESCO to prevent new buildings destroying the old, Sana’a is a place where you can spend hours, if not days, wandering the streets and feeling like you’ve stepped back in time. Life here has simply not changed enough to make you feel like it is the 21st century.

The most noticeable aspect of Old Sana’a is the architecture. The buildings are unlike anything else in the Western world, with brown exteriors with whitewashed details, stained glass, and no two buildings that look identical. Most of the buildings are tower houses, which are simply tall buildings with a central staircase that winds its way to the top. In ancient times, the bottom floor was reserved for the animals, while the upper floors were for the kitchen and families. In some cases, this still exists. To see detailed craftsmanship, look at the front doors of each building. Some are new, but many are old…very old, “modernized” by adding a padlock to them. With laws preventing the buildings from being destroyed, and from new buildings being built, the city is literally a living museum.

That was then. Now, however, the royal family of Saudi Arabia, staunch allies of the Pentagon, the CIA and David Cameron in Britain, have decided that their destruction of ancient Islamic buildings in Mecca for their new palace, in their own country, is not enough yet.

They have started destroying beautiful ancient buildings, and the people who live in them, in neighbouring countries.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Unesco furious about bombing of Sanaa

Today, 16:33

Unesco is furious about the bombing of the Yemeni capital Sanaa, early this morning. According to the UN agency “the magnificent complex of traditional houses in the al-Qasimi neighborhood” was destroyed. Houses and historic buildings were damaged and there were at least five deaths.

The Bulgarian UNESCO chief Irina Bokova was “deeply saddened” about the deaths and the damage that has been done. “I am shocked by the images of these magnificent tower houses with their beautiful gardens that now lie in ruins.” The decorated towers made of brick are world famous. They are an integral part of the Yemeni identity and national pride, says UNESCO.

Saudi Arabia

The bombings were carried out by the coalition led by Saudi Arabia. …

Witnesses say that aircraft of the coalition tried to bomb the home of a senior rebel leader and several houses were hit. The impact threatens to make more homes collapse.

This video, from today, is called Yemen: Saudi aircraft bombed the Old Sanaa. It says about itself (my translation from Arabic):

Homes in the historic city of Sanaa were destroyed by air raids by the Saudi aggressors, at dawn on Friday 12 June.

They launched aircraft attacks on the capital, targeting the city’s historic neighbourhoods and Marib Street and Faj Attan.

And the destruction on the first images showed that many historic houses in the old city of Sanaa were destroyed, falling on the heads of their inhabitants, in a new offensive by the Saudi air force against Yemenis.

This video is about an earlier bombing of ancient Sanaa. It says:

UNESCO condemns severe bombing damage to Sanaa old town

13 May 2015

The United Nations cultural agency condemned “severe damage” caused to heritage sites in Yemen, such as Sanaa’s old city, during intense bombing of the Yemeni capital.

UNESCO director general Irina Bokova said the bombing had caused severe damage to many historic buildings in the Yemeni capital, while the old city of Saada and the archaeological site of the pre-Islamic walled city of Baraqish, had also suffered damages.

Sanaa’s old city, situated in a mountain valley, has been inhabited for over 2,500 years and was a major center for the propagation of Islam, boasting over 100 mosques, and over 6,000 houses built before the 11th century. It was inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 1986.

Yemeni drone attack survivor seeks justice


This video says about itself:

Drone attacks in Yemen mostly hit civilians

17 July 2013

US drones strikes in Yemen nearly tripled last year compared to the year before, from 18 to 53, according to the New America Foundation, a Washington-based think tank. According to the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, there have been up to 154 strikes by US drones in Yemen since 2002, that has killed almost 800 people. But it is mostly civilians who are often injured or killed in these attacks. Al Jazeera’s Mohammed Adow reports from the village of Subul in Northern Yemen.

By James Tweedie:

Yemen: Washington court asked to rule drone deaths illegal

Wednesday 10th June 2015

Bereaved man seeks apology

A YEMENI man whose nephew and brother-in-law were killed in a US drone strike in 2012 has asked a Washington court to declare their deaths unlawful.

Faisal bin Ali Jaber filed a lawsuit on Monday over the killing of his brother-in-law Salem bin Ali Jaber and nephew Waleed bin Ali Jaber.

He is jointly represented by anti-death penalty and extrajudicial killing campaign Reprieve and pro bono counsel from law firm McKool Smith.

Reprieve pointed out that the two victims had no links to terrorism.

Waleed was a 26-year-old police officer with a wife and infant child of his own.

Salem was an anti-al-Qaida imam who is survived by a widow and seven young children. He had preached against extremism just days before he and Waleed were killed.

Mr bin Ali Jaber is not seeking damages for his relatives’ deaths, although he alleges that the US government offered his family an unofficial compensation payment.

He said that in July 2014 the family were offered a bag containing $100,000 (£65,000) at a meeting with the Yemeni National Security Bureau.

The bureau official told a family representative that the money had come from the US and that he had been asked to pass it on.

In November 2013, Mr bin Ali Jaber travelled to Washington DC to discuss the drone attack with senators and White House officials, many of whom offered personal regrets for the deaths of his relatives.

However, the US government has refused to publicly acknowledge or apologise for the attack.

Mr bin Ali Jaber said: “No-one will say publicly that an American drone killed Salem and Waleed, even though we all know it. This is unjust.”

“If the US was willing to pay off my family in secret cash, why can’t they simply make a public acknowledgement that my relatives were wrongly killed?”