US, UAE support for Saudi-Yemen war stopping?


This 13 July 2019 video from the USA says about itself:

House Passes Bill to Halt US Support for Yemen War, UAE Withdraws Troops

The war in Yemen could end, if U.S. and United Arab Emirates’ support for Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen is truly over. However, the House NDAA bill still faces a major hurdle in the Senate. If those who want US military involvement to end pressure Congress, it can be done, says CodePink‘s Medea Benjamin.

U.A.E. Pulls Most Forces From Yemen in Blow to Saudi War Effort: here.

‘Most forces’ unfortunately is not yet all forces.

If all UAE forces would withdraw from the Yemen war, that would be the end of their sexual torture prisons for Yemenis, run jointly with Saudi forces and United States forces.

It would also be end of UAE parents having to mourn as their conscript sons come home in coffins.

From TRTworld.com:

Is the UAE pulling out of the Yemen war?

4 July 2019

Reports about a military drawdown come at a time when the UAE is deeply involved in the complex conflict and faces global scrutiny over its role.

In the last few days, two international news organisations have reported that the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is drawing down troops from Yemen.

First reported by Reuters and then by The Wall Street Journal (WSJ), the stories based on anonymous western diplomatic sources say UAE soldiers are being called back to strengthen security at home as tensions rise in the region between the United States and Iran.

The UAE, they say, is also under pressure by European and American politicians who are angry over the humanitarian disaster in Yemen’s prolonged war.

But neither the UAE nor its Yemeni proxies have officially acknowledged any military withdrawal.

…“Reports that UAE is withdrawing its forces from Yemen should never be understood as a sign of UAE completely ending their fight in Yemen war and becoming fully interested in finding a political solution to the conflict”, says Afrah Nasser, a Yemeni-Swedish journalist. …

On the ground, especially in southern Yemen, the UAE has been more active, funding and controlling different militias including Colombian mercenaries with the ostensibly stated aim of ‘fighting Al Qaeda’.

However, multiple reports over the years have come out that say that the UAE often arms and pays militants for its own purposes.

“They didn’t come here to fight extremist groups”, says Albukhaiti …

Al Qaeda is running freely in areas controlled by the UAE and the coalition. The only place where the group is not active is under the control of Houthis.”

In a report last year, Amnesty International said there were dozens of cases where people were tortured in secret prisons run by UAE-backed forces.

Nasser, who is also the editor of Sanaa Review, says UAE runs a paramilitary force known as the ‘The Security Belt’ that is outside the rule of … the Saudis …

“So, even if the UAE decreased its forces, it still has a huge security apparatus across southern Yemen.” …

However, for the locals, the distrust runs deep.

Dubai was in control of the Aden port for years, and they destroyed it,” says Albukhaiti.

Yemen signed a contract with [UAE] DP World to run the Red Sea port in 2008 but cancelled it a few years later saying Dubai’s port operator had not met the investment commitment.

“That is why they focus on the south; they are interested in the Socotra Island, they want to control the coast”, says Albukhaiti.

Whatever the geopolitics of the conflict, it has taken a heavy toll on the Yemeni people.

Homes, farms, shops and schools – all have been attacked since the poorest country on the Arabian peninsula descended into chaos.

Depending on which source you pick, between 7,000 and 68,000 people have been killed in the war, many in relentless Saudi air raids, which have at times hit unsuspecting civilians during funerals and weddings.

The NGO Save the Children estimates that 37 children have been killed or injured on average every month last year in bombings from air raids.

That’s on top of what it reported earlier about the 80,000 kids who died because of malnourishment between 2015 and 2018. …

Over the years, the Saudis have violated international humanitarian law by using excessive air power, according to the UN.

Last month, a court in the UK ruled that that government’s deal to sell billions of dollars worth of weapons to Saudi Arabia was illegal as the weapons were being used against civilians.

Earlier, the government of Morocco stopped participating in the Saudi war.

It would be good if Sudan would also withdraw its soldiers, mostly child soldiers sent there by dictator Bashir, from Yemen.

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United States teenagers against Yemen war


This 7 July 2019 video from United States senator and presidential candidate Bernie Sanders says about itself:

These High Schoolers Want You To Know About The War in Yemen

The Yemeni people need humanitarian aid, not more bombs. These incredible high schoolers are organizing to put an end to U.S. participation in Saudi Arabia’s brutal war in Yemen. I believe that as more young people get involved in the political process, we can achieve great things, like bringing peace to the desperate people of Yemen.

Sudan dictatorship massacres own people for Saudi royals


This 31 December 2018 video says about itself:

The War In Yemen: Saudi Arabia recruits Sudanese child soldiers

Saudi Arabia has been recruiting children from desperate families in the war-torn African nation to pad up its frontlines in the Yemen war, the New York Times reported. How credible are these reports of Sudanese child soldiers fighting in Yemen? Journalist Hussain Albukhaiti explains.

Translated from Carlijne Vos in Dutch daily De Volkskrant, 5 June 2019:

Already 60 dead in the crackdown on Sudan protests, led by new strongman Hemedti

The attacks with which Sudanese security forces have been trying to put an end to peaceful protests since Monday have already killed at least 60 people. The protesters reported this in the night from Tuesday to Wednesday. The crackdown was probably triggered by one man: General Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, nicknamed Hemedti. Who is he?

As vice-president of the TMC (Transitional Military Council), Hemedti has emphatically come to the fore. Now, the 44-year-old general suddenly seems to have had enough of the civilian protests and has sent his paramilitarists, the Rapid Support Forces (RSF). This militia, which was responsible for the war crimes in Darfur under their old name Janjaweed, is now being “loaned” to Saudi Arabia to fight against the Houthi rebels in Yemen

The Sudanese dictatorship does not just ‘loan’ Janjaweed gunmen, but also child soldiers to the Saudi regime’s bloody war on the people of Yemen.

and are deployed with European Union million euros support along the border to stop migrants from going to Europe.

The demonstrators hoped with their protest actions to force the military to agree to the establishment of a civilian government. …

Visit

Last week Hemedti suddenly called on the protesters to put an end to the sit-ins because they threatened order and security in Sudan. Hemedti had just returned from a visit to Saudi crown prince Bin Salman. Since then, there has been widespread speculation about a possible power grab by Hemedti. “Hemedti planned on becoming the number one man in Sudan. He has unlimited ambition”, an opposition member told The Guardian.

According to the Sudanese journalist and sympathizer of the protest organisation Sudanese Association for Professionals (SPA), Mohammed Abdelrahman, Hemedti’s actions are largely determined by Saudi Arabia, Egypt and the Emirates. These countries are not keen on the transfer of power to civilians – for fear of civilian uprisings in their own countries – and want the army to keep a firm grip. “Hemedti has received a lot of money from them in exchange for his militia support in Yemen. There is a lot of resistance within the opposition to the Sudanese involvement in Yemen, so Hemedti is now trying to silence them”, Abdelrahman, who lives in the Netherlands, says on the phone. “Moreover, there are also many Darfuris in the opposition, against which he has no chance when elections come.” …

The military transition council TMC announced Tuesday morning after the clash with the opposition to organize new elections in nine months. The Declaration of Forces of Freedom and Change (DFCF), the alliance of all protest parties, has rejected this proposal and calls for a general strike and “civil disobedience” until the transition council has handed over power. …

Hemedti now presents himself to his allies Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Egypt as the strongman … The first evidence is that the Qatari news channel Al Jazeera was suddenly banned last month.

40 BODIES PULLED FROM NILE More than 40 bodies of people slain by Sudanese security forces were pulled from the Nile River in the capital of Khartoum, organizers of pro-democracy demonstrations said, and new clashes brought the death toll in three days of the ruling military’s crackdown to 108. [AP]

The counter-revolutionary bloodbath launched by the junta in Sudan’s capital Khartoum and its twin city Omdurman ongoing since Monday has killed some 100 people, including an eight-year old child, and injured hundreds more: here.

Saudi regime keeps killing Yemenis


A Yemeni boy sitting in the wreckage after a Saudi bombing raid – children are now going hungry and without medical treatment

From daily News Line in Britain:

Nine Yemenis killed by Saudi airstrikes

27th May 2019

AT LEAST nine Yemenis were killed late last week as Saudi-led military aircraft carried out a string of airstrikes against an area in Yemen’s southwestern province of Ta’izz.

Local sources, speaking on condition of anonymity, told the Arabic-language al-Masirah television network that the warplanes had struck a petroleum derivatives plant in the Mawiyah district of the province on Friday afternoon, leaving nine people dead and several others injured.

Earlier, Saudi-backed militiamen loyal to Yemen’s former President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi lobbed a barrage of mortar shells at a vegetable oil extraction workshop at Kilo 16 area of al-Hali district in the strategic western Yemeni province of Hudaydah.

There were no immediate reports about the extent of damage caused and possible casualties.

At the same time at least four civilians have been killed, and eleven others injured, in a Saudi airstrike in Yemen’s north western province of Hajjah.

Saudi Arabia and a number of its regional allies launched a devastating campaign against Yemen in March 2015, with the goal of bringing the government of Hadi back to power and crushing the Houthi Ansarullah movement.

The US-based Armed Conflict Location and Event Data Project (ACLED), a nonprofit conflict-research organisation, estimates that the Saudi-led war has claimed the lives of over 60,000 Yemenis since January 2016.

The war has also taken a heavy toll on the country’s infrastructure, destroying hospitals, schools, and factories. The United Nations (UN) says over 24 million Yemenis are in dire need of humanitarian aid, including 10 million suffering from extreme levels of hunger.

… Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has reportedly pledged to continue supporting Sudan’s military transition council if Khartoum agrees to keep its forces in Yemen.

Bin Salman and General Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, who goes by the nickname Hemedti, reached the agreement as they met in the Saudi city of Jeddah on Friday.

Last month, Sudan’s military announced that it had unseated [dictator] Bashir and proceeded to imprison him. It then set up the Transitional Military Council (TMC) to rule the country and promised to hand over the power after elections.

But protests, the pressure of which forced Bashir out, have continued in Sudan, with people demanding that more civilians be on the council than military figures during the transition period.

Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have pledged $3 billion to Sudan, where protesters demand that the ruling junta hand power to civilians.

But Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have announced their support for the transitional military council. They have also expressed support for measures taken by the council following Bashir’s ouster.

Last Tuesday, the leading Sudanese protest group Sudanese Professionals Association (SPA) called for a general strike as the ruling generals in the country refused to grant a demand for the establishment of a civilian-majority transitional body.

The SPA said that after two late-night negotiation sessions with the army generals, they failed to reach an agreement as the army was still insisting on directing the transition and keeping a military majority on the council.

Sudan, under Bashir, had forged close relations with Saudi Arabia after renouncing ties with Iran.