Saudi military officer murders United States colleagues


This 6 December 2019 video from the USA says about itself:

Federal agents are investigating the motive behind a shooting at a US naval base in Florida. A Saudi national who was being trained there opened fire in a classroom and killed three people. He was one of nearly 200 foreign nationals on a training course.

From the New York Times in the USA, 6 December 2019:

A member of the Saudi Air Force armed with a handgun fatally shot three people and injured eight others on Friday morning during a bloody rampage in a classroom building at the prestigious Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Fla., where he was training to become a pilot.

That Saudi military officer was training there to become a pilot in the bloody war of the Saudi regime on the people of Yemen. A war supported by President Trump of the USA, President Macron of France, Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain, etc.

Apparently, this Saudi lieutenant was so focused on killing people in Yemen that he already started practicing killing people in the USA.

The authorities, led by the F.B.I., were investigating to determine the gunman’s motive and whether the shooting was an act of terrorism.

If mass killers are white and non-Muslim, then often the NATO countries establishment claims that they are not terrorists, just ‘mentally ill‘ ‘lone wolves‘. While, if a killer is a Muslim, then one often hears instantly that he is a terrorist, part of a Muslim worldwide terrorist conspiracy, never mind that he may be obviously mentally ill, a drug addict, etc. In this case, though that Saudi military officer very probably was a Muslim, the authorities do not call him a terrorist instantly. Because of the warm friendship between Donald Trump and the Saudi bone saw killer crown prince?

By Bill Van Auken in the USA, 7 December 2019:

An attack carried out by a Saudi air force pilot early Friday morning at the US Navy’s sprawling Pensacola, Florida Naval Air Station left at least four dead, including the shooter, and another eight wounded. …

He was identified by NBC News as Second Lieutenant Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani. …

The mass shooting at the base in Pensacola was the second such incident at a US Navy facility in the space of barely 48 hours. On Wednesday, a 22-year-old sailor from Texas, identified as Gabriel Antonio Romero, opened fire at Pearl Harbor’s naval shipyard in Hawaii, killing two civilian workers and wounding a third, before shooting himself to death. …

US President Donald Trump struck a decidedly different tone, declining to answer if the attack was linked to terrorism. Instead, he cited a condolence call from Saudi Arabia’s King Salman. …

Given Trump’s demonization of Muslims, it is hard to imagine such a response if the shooter had come from any other country in the Middle East than Saudi Arabia, whose monarchical dictatorship serves a lynchpin for US imperialist policy in the region and, in particular, for its drive for regime change in Iran.

With its vast oil wealth, the Saudi monarchy has also acted in US interest in stabilizing the global oil market, while its military contracts have been the source of multi-billion-dollar profits for Raytheon, Lockheed Martin and other US arms manufacturers. The shooting in Pensacola also came just one day after Saudi Arabia’s state-owned oil monopoly ARAMCO staged the biggest initial public offering ever, with some $25.6 billion going for shares in the company.

Trump’s reaction to the Pensacola shooting was in line with his response to the grisly October 2018 assassination of dissident journalist and Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey. Then he cited $450 billion in arms contracts, Saudi collaboration against Iran and its having been “very responsive to my requests to keep oil prices at reasonable levels” as justification for turning a blind eye to the international crime. …

According to US Defense Department reports, some 1,753 Saudi military personnel were trained at US military facilities in 2018 at a cost of $120,903,786. For fiscal year 2019, it was projected that 3,150 Saudi military personnel would receive training in the US.

Friday’s shooting is not the first time that an act of terrorism by a Saudi national has been linked to the Pensacola Naval Air Base.

In the immediate aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks on New York City and Washington, in which 15 of the 19 men involved in the hijacking of three passenger planes were Saudis, a report in Newsweek magazine stated that Saeed Alghamdi was one of three hijackers who had taken flight training at the Pensacola Navy Air Station. It was also reported that three of the hijackers had listed Pensacola Naval Air Station as their address on their Florida driver’s licenses.

The Pentagon responded by stating that, while the hijackers had “similar names to foreign alumni of US military courses”, discrepancies in birth dates and other biographical information indicated that they were not the same people. A public affairs officer at Pensacola said that the base had trained more than 1,600 people with the first name Saeed, spelled in various ways, and more than 200 with the surname Alghamdi.

The Saudi pilots being trained at Pensacola and other US bases have been deployed for the most part in the near-genocidal, four-year-old Saudi war against Yemen. The US-backed war has created the worst humanitarian crisis on the planet in what was already the poorest country in the Arab world. Air strikes and other combat operations carried out by Saudi-led coalition forces with US support have caused the deaths of some 80,000 people.

The New York Times report continues:

A United States military official identified the suspect, who was killed by a sheriff’s deputy during the attack, as Second Lt. Mohammed Saeed Alshamrani. He was one of hundreds of military trainees at the base, which is considered the home of naval aviation.

Six other Saudi nationals were detained for questioning near the scene of the shooting, including three who were seen filming the entire incident, according to a person briefed on the initial stages of the investigation.

The gunman was using a locally purchased Glock 45 9-millimeter handgun with an extended magazine and had four to six other magazines in his possession when he was taken down by a sheriff’s deputy, the person said.

The shooting, the second at a Navy base this week, sent service members scrambling to lock the doors of their barracks or flee the base altogether.

The attack by a foreign national inside an American military installation raised questions about the vetting process for international students who are cleared by the Department of Defense and is likely to complicate military cooperation between the United States and Saudi Arabia.

Child victims of the bombing campaign by the Saudi regime against the Yemeni people. Besides the immediate damage, Amnesty International reports that disabled people are extra hard-hit by lack of services and displacement

This photo shows child victims of the Saudi bombing war on Yemen.

From daily News Line in Britain, 5 December 2019:

Amnesty International has raised the alarm about the dire situation of millions of people with disabilities in Yemen, saying they are hit the hardest by a years-long Saudi-led military campaign against the impoverished state.

In a report, entitled ‘Excluded: Living with disabilities in Yemen’s armed conflict’ and published on Tuesday, the London-based rights group called on international donors to address the suffering of at least 4.5 million disabled Yemenis amid the bloody Saudi-led war.

The report was published on Tuesday as the world marked the International Day of Disabled Persons.

‘Yemen’s war has been characterised by unlawful bombings, displacement and a dearth of basic services, leaving many struggling to survive. The humanitarian response is overstretched, but people with disabilities — who are already among those most at risk in armed conflict — should not face even greater challenges in accessing essential aid,’ stated Rawya Rageh, senior Crisis Advisor at Amnesty International.

‘International donors, the United Nations, and humanitarian organisations working with the Yemeni authorities must do more to overcome the barriers that prevent people with disabilities from meeting even their most basic needs,’ she added.

The report is based on a six-month research, including visits to three Southern Yemeni provinces and interviews with nearly 100 people.

Many of those interviewed said they undertook exhausting displacement journeys without wheelchairs, crutches or other assistive devices, adding that such equipment is in very short supply.

Migdad Ali Abdullah, an 18-year-old with limited mobility and difficulties in communicating, described as ‘torturous’ his trip alongside his family from Hudaydah to Lahij in early 2018.

‘I was transferred from bus to bus — in total four buses… My neighbour carried me,’ he said.

Some of the disabled Yemenis also told Amnesty International that they had been left behind as their families fled.

Meanwhile, families announced that they had sold belongings or delayed rent to prioritise costs associated with supporting a loved one with a disability.

‘I sold the furniture in my house and took her to Sana’a to get her treatment there. … Four months later, I could see she was not moving or laughing or playing. I took her up (to Sana’a) again.… The other day I even asked my friend about selling my kidney. I would sell my kidney and buy her a year’s worth of medication, the shoes she needs and everything else,’ noted the mother of a three-year-old girl with epilepsy and spinal muscular atrophy
.
According to the report, there is only one prosthetic centre in Southern Yemen, which has to send some types of prosthetics abroad for repairs.

Rasha Mohamed, Yemen Researcher at Amnesty International, urged donors to provide the disabled Yemenis with more and better-suited assistive devices.

‘People with disabilities worldwide rightly demand that no decisions be made ‘about us, without us’ – and Yemen is no exception. International donors must step up to fully fund humanitarian pledges and do a better job of ensuring that people with disabilities in Yemen are not left behind,’ she added.

Saudi Arabia and a coalition of its vassal states launched the war on Yemen in March 2015 in an attempt to reinstall a Riyadh-backed former regime.

The Western-backed military aggression, coupled with a naval blockade, has plunged Yemen into ‘the world’s worst humanitarian crisis’, according to the United Nations.

The US-based Armed Conflict Location and Event Data Project (ACLED), a nonprofit conflict-research organisation, estimates that the Saudi war has claimed more than 100,000 lives so far.

Saudi-US-UK-French war crimes in Yemen, Amnesty says


The aftermath of a bombing raid by the Saudi regime on Yemen. Amnesty International say Saudi weapons that killed civilians were supplied by the US, UK and France

From daily News Line in Britain:

US, UK & France ‘complicit in possible Saudi war crimes’ – Amnesty

27th September 2019

A NEW report by Amnesty International reveals that precision-guided bombs made by the United States have been used in Saudi-led deadly airstrikes against civilians in Yemen, saying that the US, the UK and France, which provide arms to the Riyadh regime, are complicit in ‘serious violations of international law, including possible war crimes’ committed by the kingdom during the war.

In a just-released report, the UK-based rights group said that the ordnance, manufactured by US company Raytheon, were used in a June airstrike on Yemen’s south western province of Ta’izz that killed six people, including three children.

‘It is unfathomable and unconscionable that the USA continues to feed the conveyor belt of arms flowing into Yemen’s devastating conflict,’ said Rasha Mohamed, Amnesty’s Yemen researcher.

The Amnesty International report reveals that precision-guided bombs made by the United States have been used in Saudi-led deadly airstrikes against civilians in Yemen, saying that the US, the UK and France, which provide arms to the Riyadh regime, are complicit with the violations of international law and possible war crimes committed by the kingdom during the war.

The UK-based rights group said that the ordnance, manufactured by US company Raytheon, were used in a June airstrike on Yemen’s province of Ta’izz that killed civilians.

The rights group analysed photographs of the remnants of the weapon dug out from the site of the strike by family members, concluding that the bomb that hit a residential building was a US-made 500 pound (230kg) GBU-12 Paveway II.

Mohamed lashed out at the US, the UK and France for supplying arms to the Saudi-led coalition, holding them accountable for ‘human rights violations’ and ‘possible war crimes’ in Yemen.

A United Nations panel of experts has uncovered parts of British-made weapons at the site of a Saudi-led strike in the Yemeni capital.

‘Despite the slew of evidence that the Saudi and Emirati-led coalition has time and again committed serious violations of international law, including possible war crimes, the USA and other arms-supplying countries such as the UK and France remain unmoved by the pain and chaos their arms are wreaking on the civilian population,’ Mohamed said.

‘Intentionally directing attacks against civilians or civilian objects, disproportionate attacks and indiscriminate attacks that kill or injure civilians are war crimes,’ she added.

She said that the Western trio ‘share responsibility for these violations,’ by ‘knowingly’ supplying arms to the Saudi-led coalition.

‘Arms-supplying states cannot bury their heads in the sand and pretend they do not know of the risks associated with arms transfers to parties to this conflict who have been systematically violating international humanitarian law,’ she said.

Stop Saudi war on people of Yemen


This 20 August 2019 video says about itself:

Children Who Survived the School Bus Attack in Yemen Are Still in Pain | Save the Children

One year after an air strike by the Saudi- and Emirati-led coalition hit a school bus, killing 40 children and injuring dozens more, three of the child survivors have spoken to Save the Children of their ongoing daily physical and psychological struggle.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Sunday, September 15, 2019

The Saudi war on Yemen is the real outrage

SAUDI ARABIA might slam a Houthi drone attack on its oil-producing facilities as “terrorist aggression” and find sympathetic echoes in Foreign Office statements from European and Gulf governments.

It can be confident that Western governments will ape its pretence that the drone assault was some kind of unprovoked outrage, just as they have done with previous Houthi missile attacks.

This is nonsense. No particular sympathy with the Houthi cause is required to acknowledge that the drone attack is part of a war — and a war in which the devastation wrought by Saudi Arabia in its bid to crush Yemen’s Houthi movement is the real outrage.

In four years of brutal aerial bombardment, the Saudi-led coalition has launched more than 18,000 bombing raids over Yemen.

Its war was estimated by the Armed Conflict Location and Event Data Project to have killed 56,000 Yemenis between January 2016 and October 2018, a number that will be far higher a year on.

The United Nations announced last December that Yemen would face the worst humanitarian emergency on Earth in 2019 as a result of the Saudi war and blockade, with 24 million people or 74 per cent of the entire population in need of humanitarian assistance.

Bombing raids have targeted hospitals and blown up infrastructure including water treatment and sanitation facilities and supply pipes. The cholera outbreak that has infected well over a million Yemenis in the last three years and killed well over 2,500, around 60 per cent of whom were children, is described by the executive directors of Unicef and the World Health Organisation as “the direct consequence of two years of heavy conflict.

“Collapsing health, water and sanitation systems have cut off 14.5 million people from regular access to clean water and sanitation, increasing the ability of the disease to spread.

“Rising rates of malnutrition have weakened children’s health and made them more vulnerable to disease.”

The military results of this horrendous onslaught have been negligible. Saudi forces have not displaced the Houthi movement from any significant territory. Yet the conflict continues, Riyadh’s deep pockets ensuring it can continue to drop bombs on its victims indefinitely.

Some of the standout massacres of the conflict — such as the bombing of a warehouse in a residential area in May that killed 15 children according to Human Rights Watch, or the bomb dropped on a schoolbus on August 9 2018 that put an end to the lives of 40 six-to-11-year-olds on a school trip and the 11 adults accompanying them — have led to brief international condemnation of Saudi Arabia.

The discovery that the bomb that killed the schoolchildren had been sold to the Saudis by the United States, combined with the backlash to the murder and dismemberment of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the kingdom’s Istanbul consulate, almost certainly on the orders of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, led the US Senate to pass a resolution against any further role in the conflict.

It shames Britain’s government that, like that of France, it continues not only to sell weapons to Saudi Arabia for use in these killing fields but provides Riyadh with active logistical and targeting support.

So far, few countries have echoed US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s unsubstantiated claim that the Houthi drone strike on Saudi Arabia was actually the work of Iran, though Boris Johnson’s record of fawning on the Donald Trump administration means we must be ready to resist any push to exploit this incident to ignite the new Middle East conflagration Washington seems so set on.

Our immediate priority is more urgent still: to demand a complete halt to British support for this murderous war and an end to all arms sales to Saudi Arabia, and to build a peace movement strong enough to deliver on those demands.

Trump exploits drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities to threaten war against Iran: here.

Without presenting a shred of evidence, the Trump administration charged Tehran with responsibility for attacks that provide a pretext for another US war in the Middle East: here.

The threat that Washington will unleash a major new war in the Middle East continued to escalate Tuesday as US intelligence and military officials—speaking not for attribution—claimed to have established that last Saturday’s attacks on Saudi Arabian oil installations were launched from southwestern Iran. Not a shred of evidence has been provided to substantiate this charge, and, according to Pentagon officials who spoke anonymously to National Public Radio, the evidence claimed is “circumstantial,” consisting of satellite surveillance imagery showing activity at supposed Iranian launch sites in advance of the attack on Abqaiq, the world’s largest crude oil processing facility, and the Khurais oil field, both in eastern Saudi Arabia: here.

US President Donald Trump has been presented with list of targets for US military strikes against Iran as US imperialism draws ever closer to initiating an armed conflict that could prove the antechamber to a third world war: here.