Michelangelo bronze sculpture discovery in England


This video from Cambridge University in England says about itself:

Michelangelo bronzes discovered

2 February 2015

It was thought that no bronzes by Michelangelo had survived – now experts believe they have found not one, but two – with a tiny detail in a 500-year-old drawing providing vital evidence. – See more here.

They are naked, beautiful, muscular and ride triumphantly on two ferocious panthers. And now the secret of who created these magnificent metre-high bronze male nudes could well be solved. A team of international experts led by the University of Cambridge and Fitzwilliam Museum has gathered compelling evidence that argues that these masterpieces, which have spent over a century in relative obscurity, are early works by Michelangelo, made just after he completed the marble David and as he was about to embark on the Sistine Chapel ceiling.

If the attribution is correct, they are the only surviving Michelangelo bronzes in the world.

Snowmen, snow camels banned in Saudi Arabia


This February 2014 video is called Snowfall Blankets North-Western Region of Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia is not only the country in the world practicing the death penalty by beheading. It is also the only country where women are punished for driving cars.

And, as far as I know, also the only country where making snowmen, or snow camels (or snow turtles) is illegal.

Snow camel in Saudi Arabia

From Gulf News in the United Arab emirates:

Saudi fatwa banning snowmen triggers heated debate

By Habib Toumi, Bureau Chief

Published: 10:21 January 12, 2015

Manama: Saudis in the northern areas drew on their imagination and sense of fun as they braved the cold weather to build snow camels in a rare tribute to the local culture.

One citizen in the Province of Tarif used his snow camel to promote the colours of local teams, drawing praise from the fans, while another opted for the traditional ghitra and agal to cover the head of the snowman he built.

However, it was not all fun for Saudis after a religious scholar said that building snowmen or snow animals was not acceptable in Islam.

The fatwa, by Mohammad Saleh Al Minjed, said that building snowmen or any replica of an animal, even if it is for fun or recreation, could not be condoned. Only lifeless things, such as ships, fruit and buildings could be imitated, the fatwa said. …

No date was mentioned about when the fatwa was issued, but it was widely circulated on social networks, triggering a wide and often heated online debate mainly among Gulf nationals. …

However, Mishaal, an angry blogger, blasted the fatwa.

“We have snow for fleeting days, maybe even hours, and there is always someone who wants to rob us of the joy and the fun,” he posted. “It seems that the only thing left for us is to sit down and drink coffee,” he said.

Saudi men make a snowman in the Aleghan Heights, in the Tabuk region

See also here.

Snow camel in the Netherlands

This photo shows a snow camel in the Netherlands.

Snow sea turtle built in Minnesota, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

7 January 2015

12 foot tall Giant Snow Sea Turtle. Minnesota Snow Sculpture.

Made by Austin, Trevor & Connor Bartz.

By Ryan Grenoble in the USA about this:

Brothers Build A MASSIVE Snow Sea Turtle, Put Your Snowman To Shame

01/11/2015 12:09 pm EST

Oh, you built a snowman? That’s cute.

While you were busy getting into snowball fights over the holiday break, these brothers were busy turning their front yard in New Brighton, Minnesota, into a sea turtle — a massive one made of snow.

Bartz brothers Austin, Trevor and Connor worked on the turtle from Nov. 14 through Jan. 7, reports KARE 11. The final work was 12 feet tall, 37 feet long and 31 feet wide.

Impressive as the turtle is, it’s just the latest in a series of animal-themed snow sculptures.

Once, the trio built a shark so big they could ride it.

They’ve also constructed a walrus.

And — because, why not? — a pufferfish.

Anne Frank statue in Argentina


Anne Frank statue, Merweedeplein, Amsterdam

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Anne Frank statue unveiled in Argentina

Wednesday, December 10, 2014, 21:39

In Argentina, a statue of Anne Frank has been unveiled. The statue is in Buenos Aires on the Plaza Reina de Holanda.

The artwork is a replica of the bronze statue which stands on the Merwedeplein in the Amsterdam Rivierenbuurt neighbourhood, by sculptress Jet Schepp. The 74-year old artist was present at the unveiling in Argentina.

The statue of Anne Frank has been put there on the International Human Rights Day. The monument is a joint initiative including the Argentine Ministry of Education, the Dutch Embassy in Argentina and Centro Ana Frank Argentina.

The statue at the Amsterdam Merwedeplein was unveiled in 2005. Anne Frank lived for almost ten years at the square before the Frank family went into hiding in 1942 at the Prinsengracht.

Ancient Egyptian pharaoh statues, new in museum


Statue of Pharaoh Ninetjer

Translated from the Dutch National Museum of Antiquities (Rijksmuseum van Oudheden) in Leiden today:

The National Museum of Antiquities has bought two ancient Egyptian pharaoh statues, including the oldest statue in the world with a pharaoh‘s name on it. It is a seated figure of pharaoh Ninetjer, one of the first kings of ancient Egypt (ca. 2785-2742 BC). The museum also bought a tomb statue of pharaoh Taharqa (690-664 BC.), one of the “black pharaohs” from Sudan.

Until the beginning of November 2014, you can see the pharaoh statues in a display in the entrance hall of the museum, next to the Egyptian temple. In 2016, they will get a prominent place in the by then renovated Egyptian department.

The Ninetjer statue is 13 centimeter high. The hieroglyph inscription on the statue says: ‘King of Upper and Lower Egypt, protected by the vulture and cobra, Ninetjer’. The cobra was the symbol of northern Egypt; the vulture of southern Egypt.

Pharaoh Taharqa statue

The Taharqa statue is 35 centimeter.

British actor Richard Attenborough helped honour Nelson Mandela


This video is called BBC News – Filmmaker Richard Attenborough dies at 90.

By Will Stone in Britain:

Tuesday 26th August 2014

Tributes pour in for progressive actor who died aged 90

BELOVED actor Richard Attenborough was remembered yesterday for his “determination and courage” in helping to erect the statue of Nelson Mandela in Parliament Square.

The award-winning star, described as a “titan of British cinema” by film academy Bafta and famed for his roles in blockbusters Jurassic Park, Gandhi and The Great Escape, died at lunchtime on Sunday at the age of 90.

But left groups remembered his achievements off the screen too.

Jude Woodward, former culture and creative industries advisor at City Hall under Ken Livingstone, told the Star that few have mentioned Attenborough’s “irascible” nature, which she believed helped make sure the bronze statue of South Africa’s former president and anti-apartheid activist was built.

Mr Attenborough helped set up a fund for the statue with the widow of the late anti-apartheid activist Donald Woods, who originally came up with the idea and received approval from Mandela in 2001.

“He was absolutely determined,” she said, recalling that they had initially battled to get the nine-foot statue put up outside the High Commission of South Africa in Trafalgar Square.

However Westminster Council rejected the planning application on the grounds its location would disrupt events in the area.

After much discussion the council finally agreed to erect the £400,000 sculpture, designed by Ian Walters, in Parliament Square alongside the statues of other iconic figures including Winston Churchill, Abraham Lincoln and Benjamin Disraeli.

This video from London, England is called Nelson Mandela‘s speech at the unveiling of his statue.

Mandela himself attended the unveiling of the sculpture in 2007, six years after it was first approved, and the statue is still the only one of a black person in the square.

Ms Woodward said that it was “a real achievement” and a “right and fitting legacy” to Mandela that the statue was erected in his lifetime.

Describing Mr Attenborough, she added: “If things got in his way he would not brook opposition. He was absolutely determined there would be a tribute to Mandela and that it would be erected while he was living.”

Also paying tribute, Labour leader Ed Miliband said: “The death of Richard Attenborough is a sad day for the film world and the Labour movement. He and his work will be remembered.”

BFI chief executive Amanda Nevill added: “the world has lost a very, very special person.”