Real Neat Blog Award, congratulations all nominees!


Real Neat Blog Award

Late in 2014, I made this new award: the Real Neat Blog Award. There are so many bloggers whose blogs deserve more attention. So, I will try to do something about that 🙂

It is the first award that I ever made. I did some computer graphics years ago, before I started blogging; but my computer drawing had become rusty 🙂

The ‘rules’ of the Real Neat Blog Award are: (feel free not to act upon them if you don’t have time; or don’t accept awards; etc.):

1. Put the award logo on your blog.

2. Answer 7 questions asked by the person who nominated you.

3. Thank the people who nominated you, linking to their blogs.

4. Nominate any number of bloggers you like, linking to their blogs.

5. Let them know you nominated them (by commenting on their blog etc.)

My seven questions are:

1. Where do most visits to your blog come from?

2. What is your favourite sport?

3. What has been a special moment for you so far in 2017?

4. What is your favourite quote?

5. What was your favourite class when still at school?

6. Anything you had wished to have learned earlier?

7. What musical instrument have you tried to play?

My nominees are:

1. kitli-culture

2. Ceri Lauren Wilson

3. Maruti Suzuki Workers Union

4. stbarbebaker

5. Ipuna Black

6. cyah1983

7. small step closer

8. An Obvious Oblivion Blog

9. Confused Me!!

10. Café Philos: an internet café

11. VIVID LENS VIEW

Indiana, USA barred owl nest webcam


This April 2016 video shows there were owlets in the Indiana, USA barred owl nest then.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA today:

Deep in the suburban wilds of central Indiana, the Wild Birds Unlimited Barred Owls have returned for a fourth year on cam. Nestled beneath the down feathers of the female owl are three white eggs, with hatching likely to happen around the end of the first week of April. For the last three years, the owls have had great success raising their young, fledging a total of eight owlets from eight eggs. Watch cam.

What to watch for: During the day you can listen to the sounds of spring arrive to the forests as the female incubates her eggs. At night, watch as the male owl delivers a steady stream of interesting prey items (like this crayfish) to the nest box and listen for the owls’ classic “whoo-cooks-for-you?” hooting duets. After hatching, it takes only 4 to 5 weeks for the owlets to transform from close-eyed, downy fluffballs to fierce, sometimes clumsy youngsters before setting out to explore the world.

Share what you see and hear with us on the cam‘s Twitter feed, @WBU_Owls, and join us in learning more about these secretive and adaptable predators.

Lance-tailed manakin webcam in Panama


This video from Panama says about itself:

20 March 2017

Male Lance-tailed Manakins go to great lengths to keep a well maintained display perch. Notice how this male “cleans” the area by tearing away at leaves in the area and scratching the surfaces of the surrounding branches with his beak.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

The Manakin Cam Returns

On the small Panamanian island of Boca Brava, male Lance-tailed Manakins are beginning to compete for mates—which they do by working together. You’ll have a front row seat when you watch our live cam.

The Cornell Lab has partnered with Dr. Emily DuVal to bring this live view of manakins to your screen. She has been studying these cooperative displays since 1999, unraveling the mystery of why males form alliances and work together to woo females—even though only one male typically gets to mate.

Here’s what to look for: The live cam shows a display perch used by one pair of males, within a larger area with up to 30 “alpha” males and their partners. Throughout the day, the males perform coordinated displays featuring leaps and butterfly-like flights on the display perch.

Occasionally, a brownish female stops by to watch. If she seems interested and receptive, the beta male typically leaves the area and the alpha male starts displaying on his own.

Through much of the day the perch may appear empty; but you can often hear the sweet calls of the male manakins singing a duet, trying to entice a female to check out one of their meticulously maintained display perches (they also have two other display areas off-cam). When the manakins aren’t around, other species (like this antshrike, this wren, or even this wood-rail!) may wander into the frame, and in the mornings and evenings the roaring of howler monkeys echoes through the forest.

Share what you see and hear with us on the cam’s Twitter feed, @ManakinCam, and join us in learning more about these gorgeous birds and their complicated approach to courtship. Save up your questions—Dr. DuVal will be joining us for a live Q&A session in the near future. Stay tuned for more details, and thanks for watching.

British police spying cover-up


This video from Canada says about itself:

Quebec launches commission of inquiry into police spying on journalists

4 November 2016

Probe will have powers of a commission, including ability to call witnesses and hold public hearings. To read more: here.

By Conrad Landin in Britain:

Cops deleted files to cover up hacks

Wednesday 22nd March 2017

Whistleblower reveals spying on journalists and campaigners

UNDERCOVER cops deleted files from a police database to cover up the hacking of campaigners’ emails, a police whistleblower has alleged.

Officers reportedly deleted the files in May 2014 to conceal the fact that a police instructed operative had spied on journalists and environmental and social justice campaigners.

Scotland Yard’s national domestic extremism and disorder intelligence unit, which was behind the spying, is one of a number of covert squads under the scope of the upcoming Pitchford undercover policing inquiry.

Green peer Jenny Jones, who has raised the alarm about officers shredding files relating to her own surveillance, was provided with the information by the whistleblower in a letter, her spokesman confirmed to the Star yesterday.

Ms Jones’s lawyers confirmed with six of the 10 targeted activists that their email usernames and passwords were the same as those the whistleblower had stated.

Ms Jones then referred the whistleblower’s letter to the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) and the public inquiry team.

“The personal information within the letter is accurate and it could only have been obtained illegally,” she said.

“There is more than enough to justify a full-scale criminal investigation into the activities of these police officers and referral to a public inquiry.

“I have urged the IPCC to act quickly to secure further evidence and to find out how many people were victims of this nasty practice.”

An IPCC spokesman said the agency was “still assessing the scope of the investigation” and could not make further comment.

The whistleblower, who formerly worked for the covert unit, said passwords had been passed on by a “covert human intelligence source,” a term agencies use for their spies.

According to the Guardian newspaper, the unit worked with police in India who used hackers to illegally obtain passwords.

The upcoming inquiry will consider abusive practices including the deception of women activists into relationships with officers, and spying on trade unionists.

Inquiry chairman Sir Christopher Pitchford said: “I welcome Baroness Jones’s decision to bring these allegations to the attention of the inquiry.

“In my view, the IPCC is undoubtedly the right body to investigate … At present the inquiry is unaware of any connection between the allegations in this letter and the inquiry’s terms of reference.

“We would welcome the opportunity to speak with the author of the letter and I would urge that person to contact the inquiry on terms of confidentiality.”

Real Neat Blog Award, congratulations to sixteen nominees!


Real Neat Blog Award

Late in 2014, I made this new award: the Real Neat Blog Award. There are so many bloggers whose blogs deserve more attention. So, I will try to do something about that 🙂

It is the first award that I ever made. I did some computer graphics years ago, before I started blogging; but my computer drawing had become rusty 🙂

The ‘rules’ of the Real Neat Blog Award are: (feel free not to act upon them if you don’t have time; or don’t accept awards; etc.):

1. Put the award logo on your blog.

2. Answer 7 questions asked by the person who nominated you.

3. Thank the people who nominated you, linking to their blogs.

4. Nominate any number of bloggers you like, linking to their blogs.

5. Let them know you nominated them (by commenting on their blog etc.)

My seven questions are:

1. Where do most visits to your blog come from?

2. What is your favourite sport?

3. What has been a special moment for you so far in 2017?

4. What is your favourite quote?

5. What was your favourite class when still at school?

6. Anything you had wished to have learned earlier?

7. What musical instrument have you tried to play?

My nominees are:

1. Think it, Ink it

2. The Godly Chic Diaries

3. Ecoseasons

4. Urban Poetry

5. H.Pomatia

6. deep down the thoughts…

7. future advocate shubham modi

8. the harlequin

9. Ed A. Murray

10. Helli Patel

11. tHe BeAuTiFuLl WoRlD

12. To Find the Colors Again

13. Her Lost Mango

14. Aditya’s Birding Blog

15. XFTLOWX

16. Altea Addison is Writing

No new blog posts now, but they’ll be back


Blogging cartoon

For a week or two, I won’t be on the Internet.

However, after that, new Dear Kitty. Some blog posts will be back; with, I hope, beautiful inspiration from somewhere where I had not been before.

So, see all of you again then!

Wildlife webcams worldwide


This live stream webcam from the USA says about itself:

Watch The Puffin Loafing Ledge – LIVE.

Atlantic Puffins spend most of their time at sea — coming to land each spring to breed in colonies on northern coastal islands, like Seal Island National Wildlife Refuge in Maine, home to the puffins visible on our live “loafing ledge” cam. While puffins, with their colorful bills, are the stars of the loafing ledge, lucky viewers may also catch a glimpse of three other striking black and white seabirds. Razorbills are taller than puffins with a flat, black beak. And watch for Black Guillemots, jaunty seabirds with black bodies and white shoulders – they have bright red feet and mouth lining. Common Murres may show up on the ledge, too; identify them by their distinctive pointed beak. You may also see Audubon Project Puffin interns who are spending the summer studying and protecting puffins and other species.

The Seal Island Audubon Live cams are located 20 miles off of Rockland, Maine. Transporting the video image from the island to the Internet is a complex process that involves beaming the signal 26 miles from Seal Island to a radio tower above Rockland. The signal is then relayed an additional 2.5 miles to the top of the Tradewinds Motor Inn in Rockland, where a rooftop dish transfers the video signal to a cable that runs into Project Puffin Visitor Center, from there it is relayed to the Internet. The video stream is occasionally affected by factors such as changes in tide, reflection off the sea surface and dense fog. During these times the images may be lost. If this happens, stay tuned and the signal will be restored quickly.

Other wildlife webcams:

Explore Main Channel
Explore Africa
Explore Bears
Explore Birds
Explore Oceans

This live stream webcam video from Bermuda says about itself:

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here, and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) here.

We’re excited to share a brand new live viewing experience featuring the critically endangered Bermuda Cahow, a kind of gadfly petrel that nests nowhere in the world except rocky islets off the coast of Bermuda. In the early 1600s, this once-numerous seabird was thought to have gone extinct, driven out of existence by the invasive animals and habitat changes associated with the settlement of the island. In 1951, after nearly 300 years, a single bird was rediscovered, and since then the species has been part of a government-led conservation effort to revive the species.

Much of this conservation work by the Bermuda Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) has centered on the creation of manmade burrows to increase nesting habitat, and to create new colonies on larger islands that are more robust to the increasing threats of hurricanes. The Cornell Lab entered into a partnership with the innovative Nonsuch Expeditions, a multimedia and outreach effort centered on Nonsuch Island that is committed to raising awareness and conserving the unique animals and environments on and around Bermuda. They have successfully broadcasted from a cahow burrow in past years, and this year we are working together to create an experience that will blend both live footage from a new camera as well as interaction with DENR Senior Terrestrial Conservation Officer Jeremy Madeiros during his weekly nest checks throughout the nesting season.

This on-camera pair has been together since 2009, using this same burrow each of those years, and has fledged successfully for the last three years. During the nesting season, the cahows only visit and court under the cover of night, then head out to sea during daylight hours. The pair returned to the island in mid-November to court and mate, then disappeared out to sea for the month of December. On January 11, the female returned, and within an hour or so of arriving she laid a single egg that will be the singular focus of the pair’s efforts for the next 5-6 months. The male and female will share incubation duties, and hatch won’t be for another 52-55 days—likely around the end of the first week of March.

You can follow updates and ask questions via the cahow cam’s Twitter feed — we look forward to learning about this cryptic species alongside you.

The Kauai Laysan Albatross Cam from Hawaii is here.

This live stream webcam video says about itself:

Watch The Bison Calving: Grasslands National Park Cam – LIVE.

Bison are the largest indigenous land mammal in North America. Considered a keystone species, these wooly herbivores helped shaped the ecology of the Great Plains today. Though 80% of Canada’s native prairie has been lost, Grasslands National Park represents the most intact example of what remains with a flourishing herd of nearly 200 bison that freely roam their native prairie.

Grasslands National Park preserves a mixed-grass ecosystem of over 70 different species of grass and over 50 different species of wildflowers. Grasslands is the only place in Canada where you can see the Black-tailed Prairie Dog and the Black-footed Ferret and Eastern Yellow-bellied Racers in their native habitat.

In the Netherlands, the 2017 Beleef de Lente webcams of nesting birds will start on 7 March at 8PM local time. There will be webcams for white storks, little owls, barn owls, tawny owls, peregrine falcons, kingfishers, and great tits; and, this year for the first time, grey herons and swifts.