John Lydon’s 1978 warnings on Jimmy Savile censored by BBC

This video from Britain says about itself:

Piers Morgan’s Life Stories – Friday 25 September 2015 at 9pm on ITV.

John Lydon discusses what’s in his bag.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

John Lydon says he was ‘banned from BBC’ over Jimmy Savile comments

The former Sex Pistol says he ‘did his bit’ to alert the public to Savile but that his comments made in 1978 were never aired

Thursday 24 September 2015 11.54 BST

John Lydon has claimed he was banned from the BBC after speaking out against Jimmy Savile.

The former Sex Pistol was referring to an interview he’d given in 1978, during which he had said that Savile was “into all sorts of seediness. We all know about it but we’re not allowed to talk about it. I know some rumours.”

Speaking to Piers Morgan for his Life Stories show, he said: “I’m very, very bitter that the likes of Savile and the rest of them were allowed to continue. I did my bit, I said what I had to. But they didn’t air that.”

He continued: “I found myself banned from BBC radio for quite a while, for my contentious behaviour. They wouldn’t state this directly; there’d be other excuses.”

The band were already in the BBC’s bad books before Lydon’s Savile comments: God Save The Queen received a total ban on radio play from the corporation in May 1977. Lydon didn’t go into the specifics of what the ban entailed, although he said: “Weren’t I right? I think most kids wanted to go on Top of the Pops but we all knew what that cigar muncher was up to.”

German anti-nazi punk song tops the charts

This 1993 German music video is called Die ÄrzteSchrei nach Liebe“. The lyrics are here.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

German punk band set to top charts in wake of refugee arson attacks

Cry for Love, Die Ärzte’s anti-Nazi song from 90s, re-released as part of campaign taking a stand against racism

Josie Le Blond in Berlin

Wednesday 9 September 2015 12.12 BST

A social media campaign has lifted a 22-year-old song mocking neo-Nazis back to the top of Germany’s single charts, in response to far-right arson attacks on refugee shelters.

Cry for Love by Berlin punk band Die Ärzte – a song about a young fascist scared of intimacy – was first released in 1993 during an earlier wave of neo-Nazi violence against immigrants.

The song, featuring the refrain “Your violence is just a silent cry for love … oh, oh, oh arsehole,” is poised to reach No 1 in the charts when official sales, download and airplay figures are released on Friday, said chart observer Media Control.

Cry for Love has already broken this year’s record for the most downloads within a week, said official chart-watchers Gfk.

The campaign was initiated by Gerhard Torges, a a 46-year-old music teacher from Osnabrück with no previous experience of online activism. He said the campaign was his way of taking a stand against racism.

“I was really surprised, I never thought we’d manage it,” he said. “I haven’t got involved with volunteering to help refugees here because I don’t know where to go and I don’t have time. It’s much easier online.”

Die Ärzte, a veteran punk band formed in west Berlin in 1982, have said they will donate all proceeds to Pro-Asyl, a German human rights NGO working with refugees.

“The campaign would have been cool with any other anti-Nazi song, but of course if it’s going to be ours, we’re very happy to support it,” wrote the band in a statement posted on the campaign website. “To all Nazis and their supporters, we wish you bad entertainment.”

Lyrics such as “Because you’re scared of a cuddle, you’re a fascist,” have struck a chord as the German public comes to terms with a staggering influx of refugees and migrants and a rise in violence against the newcomers. The country expects 800,000 refugees by the end of this year and is braced to accept half a million a year thereafter.

Over the weekend, crowds of volunteers gathered at railway stations in Munich and other cities to welcome tens of thousands of refugees, mostly from Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq, arriving on trains from Hungary via Austria.

Police estimate there have been more than 250 attacks on refugee shelters in Germany this year. Last month, 30 police officers were injured in a riot in Heidenau near Dresden at a march by neo-Nazis and their sympathisers against a new refugee shelter.

Punk music police censorship in English football

This music video from Britain is called Sex Pistols – Anarchy In The UK 1976.

By poet Attila the Stockbroker in England:

Anarchy in the UK – but censorship in Gillingham

Thursday 5th March 2015

Now my autobiography is finished the gigs are beginning to start again. Today my wife and I are off to Lerwick for my first ever appearances in Shetland – hooray! Looking forward to that, and to sampling the ale from the legendary Valhalla Brewery — an extended report of proceedings will be in my next column.

And I had a brilliant show last Sunday at the Winter of Discontent punk festival in north London with Sunderland heroes and old mates Angelic Upstarts, Welsh anti-fascist legends The Oppressed and Edinburgh’s hilarious Oi Polloi.

Now a bit more from the book.

To set the scene — it’s 1997 and the crisis at my beloved Brighton & Hove Albion is at its height. Our Goldstone Ground has been sold to property speculators, we’re playing our “home” games at Gillingham, a round trip of 140 miles, and we’re second from bottom of the entire Football League.

To try and liven things up a bit, I’ve persuaded club chairman Dick Knight to let me be PA announcer and DJ, playing punk, reggae and ska. It’s Boxing Day 1997, at home to Colchester. A noon kick-off.

We’d obviously had to set off really early to get to Gillingham in time for the game and everyone was a bit bleary-eyed. So, for the first time, I decided to play Anarchy in the UK by the Sex Pistols. It had been on for about a minute when a policeman burst into the box.

“Take that off! Take that off! Now!”

“Why?’”I asked. But I could see that he was really angry. So I did, and put the Clash on instead.

This music video from England is called The Clash – Janie Jones (live at the Belle Vue, Manchester, UK 15. November 1977).

“You can’t play that record at a football match. It’s banned. It’s on THE LIST!”

“What list?” I asked. “No-one has ever told me there was a list of records I couldn’t play!”

“Well, it’s obvious, isn’t it!’ he shouted. “It’s obvious!”

I stood there, the Clash playing in the background, perplexed. It evidently wasn’t “obvious” to me and the fact that he needed to explain further made him even more angry. “It incites violence in the crowd!” he exclaimed.

I thought for a few seconds. “Well, officer,” I said. “I bought two copies of Anarchy in the UK in the black sleeve on EMI Records on the day that it came out in 1976. I have played it and heard it many, many times since and not once has doing so given me violent thoughts of any kind whatsoever.

“I have also been to all 92 Football League grounds and every time I have heard In the Air Tonight by Phil Collins I have had to restrain myself from committing serious acts of criminal damage!”

He didn’t get the joke and, a couple of days later, Brighton & Hove Albion FC received a formal letter from Kent Police banning me from doing the PA at Gillingham any longer.

Dick Knight phoned me up. “I’m not having that, John!” He spoke to them and the ban was rescinded, on condition that I didn’t play Anarchy in the UK again. So I didn’t.

This music video is called The Damned – Smash it Up; Old Grey Whistle Test.

I did play Smash it Up by the Damned and I Fought the Law and White Riot by the Clash in the next couple of weeks though. No policeman appeared in the box. Obviously those three weren’t on THE LIST.

This music video is called The Clash – I Fought The Law (Live at The London Lyceum Theatre – 1979).

This music video is called The Clash – White Riot.

Finnish punk rockers with disabilities to Eurovision Song Contest

This video from England says about itself:

21 December 2014

Finnish punks Pertti Kurikan Nimipäivät (PKN) at the Lexington, London.

After Finnish hard rock band Lordi, who participated in the Eurovision Song Contest in 2006, and won (dressed like dinosaurs) …

From the BBC:

1 March 2015

Finland punk band PKN set for Eurovision

A punk band made up of men with learning disabilities is to represent Finland at the Eurovision Song Contest.

The quartet, named PKN, was chosen by Finnish viewers on Saturday and has now been ranked by bookmakers as among the favourites for the contest.

The group, whose members have Down’s syndrome and autism, will perform their 85-second song Aina Mun Pitaa (I Always Have To) at the event in Vienna in May.

“Every person with a disability ought to be braver,” singer Kari Aalto said.

“He or she should themselves say what they want and do not want,” he told Finnish broadcaster YLE.

The group – full name Pertti Kurikan Nimipaivat (Pertti Kurikka’s Nameday) – will also become the first punk band to compete at Eurovision.

They first got together during a charity workshop and appeared in an award-winning 2012 documentary called The Punk Syndrome.

This Finnish video says about itself:

The Punk Syndrome – Kovasikajuttu

12 February 2015

A Finnish punk-rock band formed by four mentally disabled guys.

The BBC article continues:

The song deals with the frustration of the rules of daily life, like having to eat healthily and doing chores like cleaning and washing up.

‘Changing attitudes’

“We are rebelling against society in different ways, but we are not political,” bassist Sami Helle told The Guardian.

“We are changing attitudes somewhat, a lot of people are coming to our gigs and we have a lot of fans.

“We don’t want people to vote for us to feel sorry for us, we are not that different from everybody else – just normal guys with a mental handicap.”

They are 5/1 to win the contest, according to Betfred, making them third favourites behind Italy and Estonia.

Heavy metal band Lordi gave Finland its only Eurovision win to date with Hard Rock Hallelujah in 2006.

The UK’s Eurovision entrant will be named on Saturday.