Deadly radiation in Fukushima

This music video from Japan says about itself:

“The Scrap” punk band blasts Fukushima aftermath. Thousands still homeless after earthquake and tsunami. Nobutaka Takahashi, lead vocal, “The Scrap”. Wednesday, May 23, 2012.

From the Japan Times:

Deadly 9.4 sieverts detected outside Fukushima reactor 2 containment vessel; checks stop

Oct 30, 2015

Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Thursday that radiation levels of up to 9.4 sieverts per hour have been detected near a reactor containment vessel at the meltdown-hit Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.

Sept. 4-25 checks found the extremely high radiation levels in a small building containing a pipe that is connected to the reactor 2 containment vessel at the plant, which was devastated in the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami, Tepco said.

Exposure to such a dosage for some 45 minutes would result in death. Tepco said it expects decontamination work at the site to take at least one month.

Although details surrounding the high radiation levels remain scarce, the highest contamination was detected near the floor of the building, according to the company.

Tepco had planned to begin checking the inside of the containment vessel in August by using a remote-controlled robot, but high radiation levels have stalled the examination.

Extremely high radiation levels and the inability to grasp the details about melted nuclear fuel make it impossible for the utility to chart the course of its planned decommissioning of the reactors at the plant.

Time has come for an ‘honorable retreat’ from Tokyo 2020 [Olympics] over Fukushima — Dr. Brian Victoria, The Japan Times: here.

Cancer and Fukushima: Who to trust? — The Japan Times: here.

JAPAN Nuclear Fuel Ltd announced yesterday that it was postponing the opening of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant until September 2018. The company cited regulators’ lengthy inspection procedures and the time needed for safety upgrades: here.

Radioactive waste mounts up as residents resist post-Fukushima disposal plans — The Asahi Shimbun: here.

British women punk rockers in concert

This music video from Britain says about itself:

Argonaut – Touch Electric – Official Music Video (Criminal Records)

Argonaut – Touch Electric – Out Now – Album Out Monday 19th November, 2012

Argonaut were snapped up by Criminal Records in late 2011. Their sound combines super sweet sexy vocals with rocktastic guitar riffs, shrill synths and the occasional harmonica for a rock mix with an alternative edge.

‘Argonaut put forward a good case for being brilliant….. Sounds like Siouxsie And The Banshees, while their commitment to youth, ideas and passion should be lauded and rewarded’ James Jam NME

By Bob Oram in England:

Punk witches cast potent hexes for Halloween

Wednesday 4th November 2015

Dream Nails + Argonaut + The Ethical Debating Society
Veg Bar, London SW2

4 stars

LOUD, proud and angry, these feminist women make music for a packed — and mixed — audience who love every minute of this Veg Bar gig.

Dream Nails, activists who formed their band only three months ago, are self-proclaimed “punk witches from hell” and seeing their third gig is like witnessing history in the making.

“These are not songs but hexes,” says lead singer Janey and they certainly bewitch, overcoming a poor PA to wow the crowd with a glorious riot-grrrl set.

Guitarist Anya is on fire and Emmett and Judith maintain a perfect rhythm platform for Janey to show vocal anger and passion in a set that includes Vagina Police, Not abt U, DIY, Joke Choke, Bully Girl and the superbly catchy and danceable Deep Heat.

With no stage, the bands are right up close, in and among the audience and nothing suits Argonaut better.

New drummer Omz is a revelation, gelling neatly with Joules to power a great performance that sees Abby and Lorna clearly enjoying the moment.

Layered with intricate keyboards and guitars, the sound is a soundscape for Lorna to embellish. Lost in the moment, she dances, shakes and jumps while still singing perfectly.

Touch Electric, Seven, Owners and Vintage Dress, drawn from their two albums, are stand-outs in what’s a classic show.

The unique Ethical Debating Society are informed by a DIY sensibility that says “anyone can do this” and they even get an audience member up to have a go with them.

They’re scary, not just because it’s Hallowe’en but for the rare intensity of the two-guitar aural assault by Tegan and Kris.

Their yelled, call-and-response vocals blur the lyrical content in the heartburn of the sound but a set drawn from their New Sense album showcases their glorious riot pop perfectly.

Their blasts of Oh Bondage Up Yours at the end is a perfect nod to previous generations who blazed this trail.

If Bikini Kill’s Kathleen Hanna had come down to the Veg Bar she would have been proud of what these amazing women are doing.

This 2013 music video from Britain is called The Ethical Debating Society – Creosote ideas.

This music video is called X Ray Spex – Oh Bondage Up Yours (TWNDISH 1978).

This music video is called Siouxsie And The Banshees – Love In A Void. Live on Something Else 1979.

John Lydon’s 1978 warnings on Jimmy Savile censored by BBC

This video from Britain says about itself:

Piers Morgan’s Life Stories – Friday 25 September 2015 at 9pm on ITV.

John Lydon discusses what’s in his bag.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

John Lydon says he was ‘banned from BBC’ over Jimmy Savile comments

The former Sex Pistol says he ‘did his bit’ to alert the public to Savile but that his comments made in 1978 were never aired

Thursday 24 September 2015 11.54 BST

John Lydon has claimed he was banned from the BBC after speaking out against Jimmy Savile.

The former Sex Pistol was referring to an interview he’d given in 1978, during which he had said that Savile was “into all sorts of seediness. We all know about it but we’re not allowed to talk about it. I know some rumours.”

Speaking to Piers Morgan for his Life Stories show, he said: “I’m very, very bitter that the likes of Savile and the rest of them were allowed to continue. I did my bit, I said what I had to. But they didn’t air that.”

He continued: “I found myself banned from BBC radio for quite a while, for my contentious behaviour. They wouldn’t state this directly; there’d be other excuses.”

The band were already in the BBC’s bad books before Lydon’s Savile comments: God Save The Queen received a total ban on radio play from the corporation in May 1977. Lydon didn’t go into the specifics of what the ban entailed, although he said: “Weren’t I right? I think most kids wanted to go on Top of the Pops but we all knew what that cigar muncher was up to.”

German anti-nazi punk song tops the charts

This 1993 German music video is called Die ÄrzteSchrei nach Liebe“. The lyrics are here.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

German punk band set to top charts in wake of refugee arson attacks

Cry for Love, Die Ärzte’s anti-Nazi song from 90s, re-released as part of campaign taking a stand against racism

Josie Le Blond in Berlin

Wednesday 9 September 2015 12.12 BST

A social media campaign has lifted a 22-year-old song mocking neo-Nazis back to the top of Germany’s single charts, in response to far-right arson attacks on refugee shelters.

Cry for Love by Berlin punk band Die Ärzte – a song about a young fascist scared of intimacy – was first released in 1993 during an earlier wave of neo-Nazi violence against immigrants.

The song, featuring the refrain “Your violence is just a silent cry for love … oh, oh, oh arsehole,” is poised to reach No 1 in the charts when official sales, download and airplay figures are released on Friday, said chart observer Media Control.

Cry for Love has already broken this year’s record for the most downloads within a week, said official chart-watchers Gfk.

The campaign was initiated by Gerhard Torges, a a 46-year-old music teacher from Osnabrück with no previous experience of online activism. He said the campaign was his way of taking a stand against racism.

“I was really surprised, I never thought we’d manage it,” he said. “I haven’t got involved with volunteering to help refugees here because I don’t know where to go and I don’t have time. It’s much easier online.”

Die Ärzte, a veteran punk band formed in west Berlin in 1982, have said they will donate all proceeds to Pro-Asyl, a German human rights NGO working with refugees.

“The campaign would have been cool with any other anti-Nazi song, but of course if it’s going to be ours, we’re very happy to support it,” wrote the band in a statement posted on the campaign website. “To all Nazis and their supporters, we wish you bad entertainment.”

Lyrics such as “Because you’re scared of a cuddle, you’re a fascist,” have struck a chord as the German public comes to terms with a staggering influx of refugees and migrants and a rise in violence against the newcomers. The country expects 800,000 refugees by the end of this year and is braced to accept half a million a year thereafter.

Over the weekend, crowds of volunteers gathered at railway stations in Munich and other cities to welcome tens of thousands of refugees, mostly from Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq, arriving on trains from Hungary via Austria.

Police estimate there have been more than 250 attacks on refugee shelters in Germany this year. Last month, 30 police officers were injured in a riot in Heidenau near Dresden at a march by neo-Nazis and their sympathisers against a new refugee shelter.

Punk music police censorship in English football

This music video from Britain is called Sex Pistols – Anarchy In The UK 1976.

By poet Attila the Stockbroker in England:

Anarchy in the UK – but censorship in Gillingham

Thursday 5th March 2015

Now my autobiography is finished the gigs are beginning to start again. Today my wife and I are off to Lerwick for my first ever appearances in Shetland – hooray! Looking forward to that, and to sampling the ale from the legendary Valhalla Brewery — an extended report of proceedings will be in my next column.

And I had a brilliant show last Sunday at the Winter of Discontent punk festival in north London with Sunderland heroes and old mates Angelic Upstarts, Welsh anti-fascist legends The Oppressed and Edinburgh’s hilarious Oi Polloi.

Now a bit more from the book.

To set the scene — it’s 1997 and the crisis at my beloved Brighton & Hove Albion is at its height. Our Goldstone Ground has been sold to property speculators, we’re playing our “home” games at Gillingham, a round trip of 140 miles, and we’re second from bottom of the entire Football League.

To try and liven things up a bit, I’ve persuaded club chairman Dick Knight to let me be PA announcer and DJ, playing punk, reggae and ska. It’s Boxing Day 1997, at home to Colchester. A noon kick-off.

We’d obviously had to set off really early to get to Gillingham in time for the game and everyone was a bit bleary-eyed. So, for the first time, I decided to play Anarchy in the UK by the Sex Pistols. It had been on for about a minute when a policeman burst into the box.

“Take that off! Take that off! Now!”

“Why?’”I asked. But I could see that he was really angry. So I did, and put the Clash on instead.

This music video from England is called The Clash – Janie Jones (live at the Belle Vue, Manchester, UK 15. November 1977).

“You can’t play that record at a football match. It’s banned. It’s on THE LIST!”

“What list?” I asked. “No-one has ever told me there was a list of records I couldn’t play!”

“Well, it’s obvious, isn’t it!’ he shouted. “It’s obvious!”

I stood there, the Clash playing in the background, perplexed. It evidently wasn’t “obvious” to me and the fact that he needed to explain further made him even more angry. “It incites violence in the crowd!” he exclaimed.

I thought for a few seconds. “Well, officer,” I said. “I bought two copies of Anarchy in the UK in the black sleeve on EMI Records on the day that it came out in 1976. I have played it and heard it many, many times since and not once has doing so given me violent thoughts of any kind whatsoever.

“I have also been to all 92 Football League grounds and every time I have heard In the Air Tonight by Phil Collins I have had to restrain myself from committing serious acts of criminal damage!”

He didn’t get the joke and, a couple of days later, Brighton & Hove Albion FC received a formal letter from Kent Police banning me from doing the PA at Gillingham any longer.

Dick Knight phoned me up. “I’m not having that, John!” He spoke to them and the ban was rescinded, on condition that I didn’t play Anarchy in the UK again. So I didn’t.

This music video is called The Damned – Smash it Up; Old Grey Whistle Test.

I did play Smash it Up by the Damned and I Fought the Law and White Riot by the Clash in the next couple of weeks though. No policeman appeared in the box. Obviously those three weren’t on THE LIST.

This music video is called The Clash – I Fought The Law (Live at The London Lyceum Theatre – 1979).

This music video is called The Clash – White Riot.