Canadian punk rockers D.O.A. tour Australia


This is a music video of the D.O.A. song Police Brutality.

By Chris Peterson in Australia:

Canadian punk veterans DOA hit Australia one last time

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Veteran Canadian punk band DOA have set sail for Australia for one final tour this month. Formed in 1978, Henry Rollins described the band as “live they were monumental, change your life, blow away time … They came to town and we were like WOW!”

DOA’s slogan has been “Talk minus Action equals Zero” and the band has been active on many issues, including anti-racism, anti-globalisation, freedom of speech, and the environment.

In 2003, founding member Joe “Shithead” Keithley released his autobiography, I, Shithead: A Life in Punk.

The tour starts on April 24, the day before ANZAC Day when Australia commemorates invading another nation. Much of DOA’s work is about ending war and militarism. Keithley told Green Left Weekly: “It’s always important for artists to stand up against violence. I would rather talk to somebody for an endless amount up time than start up some sort of violent action.”

DOA have been touring for more than 35 years and survived a number of pretty nasty US governments, such as Ronald Reagan and two Bushs. Keithley says the secret is “a lot of gaffer tape and beer!”

“But seriously,” he added, “it’s been a spirit of camaraderie and purpose and that purpose is trying to change the world into a better place. TALK minus ACTION equals ZERO.”

More recently, Keithley has run for office: “My mandate is to try and get people to have a lot more to say in our political system. That and education for all — education should be a right not a privilege.”

DOA has been very influential and often helped other bands to get a start, especially via their record company, Sudden Death Records.

Keithley offers this advice to musicians on swimming against the stream: “It’s real basic. Stick to your guns, play what you want to play, don’t worry about what is perceived as being popular. If you stay together long enough and you’re any good, people will eventually figure it out!”

Tour dates:
– Thursday April 24th
The Evelyn, Fitzroy
– Friday April 25th
The Basement, Belconnen (Canberra)
– Saturday April 26th
Hermann’s Bar, Sydney
– Sunday April 27th
Prince of Wales, Brisbane

Visit thedrunkpromoter.com for further information.

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Fukushima, Japan disaster news update


This music video by Hazardous Punk Architects is called Black Nebula (Tears Of Fukushima) [ORIGINAL PUNK ROCK SONG].

Fukushima return: at nuclear site, how safe is “safe?” — National Geographic Daily News: here.

Abe must act now to seal Fukushima reactors, before it’s too late — Letter to Shinzo Abe in the South China Morning Post: here.

Lessons of Fukushima: Reactor restarts are unwise — The Japan Times: here.

August water leak at No. 1 far more toxic than announced: Tepco — The Japan Times: here.

Gov’t team withholds high radiation data on three Fukushima sites — Mainichi: here.

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Fukushima nuclear disaster update


This music video from Japan says about itself:

SCRAP performing their song “Fuck Tepco” in Koriyama, 10/2/11

Scrap is a punk rock band, consisting of Fukushima survivors who lost everything in the disaster.

Tepco company admitted security fault in Fukushima, Japan: here.

Japan lacks decommissioning experts for Fukushima — Phys.org: here.

TEPCO: Not all pumped-in water reached overheating Fukushima reactors — The Asahi Shimbun: here.

Rick de Leeuw concert live on radio


This is a music video of Rick de Leeuw singing the song Kom bij mij, at the live national radio concert in Hilversum, the Netherlands, on 2 November. Rick de Leeuw came on stage after Berget Lewis (on whose performance this blog reported earlier).

The video was recorded on mobile phone, so please don’t expect professional quality :)

Decades ago, Rick de Leeuw was singer of the Amsterdam punk rock band Tröckener Kecks. Later, he became well-known for poetry as well.

He now is a radio presenter in Belgium; though he lives in Amsterdam. His backing band at the Hilversum concert were Belgian musicians. Contrary to Berget Lewis, they did include a bass guitar with their drums, guitar and keyboard.

Punk rock music, Peruvian origins?


This music video says about itself:

12 Aug 2013

Who invented punk rock? Was it the Ramones in New York? Was it the Sex Pistols in the UK? FALSE! It was Los Saicos in in Peru.

One of punk’s best kept secrets, Los Saicos were the original Peruvian proto-punks. After storming onto the Peruvian music scene, Los Saicos rocked for only a little over a year, but left a lasting influence on the sound of the sixties and future punk to come.

By Katherine Brooks in the USA:

Meet Los Saicos, The Peruvian Band Credited With Inventing Punk Rock

8/15/2013 3:29 pm EDT

Earlier this year we learned that American punk music was not exactly the brainchild of those mop-headed Ramone kids. Instead, the genre has earlier roots in a little band known as “Death.” Born out of Detroit, the group of three brothers are credited with forming not only the first black punk band, but quite possibly the first U.S. punk band ever.

Now a documentary by Noisey is shedding light on what might be one of the first punk bands… in the world. The group in question was called Los Saicos, consisting of four guys by the names of Erwin Flores, Rolando Carpio, César “Papi” Castrillón, and Pancho Guevara who played together for approximately two years in the 1960s. Channeling just enough anger and garage sensibilities, the motley crew of amateur musicians combined psychobilly with surf rock a decade before punk hit the shores of England or the dark venues of New York City.

The title of “first punk band” is certainly debatable, but Los Saitos’ claim to the title has grown in recent years as contemporary musicians like The Black Lips have cited the Peruvian group as inspiration. “They are the first to play what later became punk. There was no name for that at the time, but the riffs are definitely punk,” explained José Beramendi, the producer of the 2012 documentary “Saicomania”, to The Guardian. “You expect this sound from North America or Europe, but it’s not something you expect to hear in the 1960s in Latin America.”

Punk rock in Greece: here.