European Union propaganda and Lesbos refugees reality


This video about Iraq says about itself:

Mosul Offensive Will Create More Refugees, Displacement, and Humanitarian Disaster

11 July 2016

Institute for Policy Studies Fellow Phyllis Bennis says the fightback against ISIS requires the abandonment of more military force, and the pursuit of diplomacy with Russia and Iran.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Things go well on Lesbos, says Brussels. Until you start looking there yourself

Today, 12:14

In spite of Europe we still exist.” That’s the predominant feeling on Lesbos, the Greek island that was flooded last year by boat people. 600,000 of the 1 million refugees who then reached Greece arrived on the island off the Turkish coast.

After the EU-Turkey deal in March this year, the number of refugee dinghies dropped drastically. But the people are still afraid, noted EU correspondent Arjan Noorlander ….

Distressing situation

Noorlander decided to look for himself what has become of all the plans and optimistic words he heard in Brussels in recent months. He was disappointed drastically at what the EU is doing to help the refugees and the people of Lesbos. “It’s a very different situation than I expected after following the political discussions in Brussels. From these you get the idea that they really are tackling problems. That idea proves to be untrue here. It is distressing.”

He is shocked by the extent of the problem. What struck Noorlander most was a huge pile of life jackets at a local landfill. “Such a stack as a symbol of all those hundreds of thousands of boat people hurts one pretty hard inside. Then it becomes from a problem that you know from TV or from the political corridors suddenly a real problem of real people.”

“Europe has done preciously little for Lesbos,” he says. “You can see that the refugees all these months anyway were mostly helped by volunteers. In the official camps you see United Nations stickers everywhere, because the United Nations [contrary to the EU] is present.”

Brussels was said they would help the Greeks with the reception and even take over refugees. All that does not happen, Noorlander notes. People are thereby stuck on the islands, where it starts to get more crowded.

The facilities are in reasonable order, but because of the bigger crowds the situation is not improving. “The atmosphere in the camps is tense. There has to be done little before things may get out of hand.”

According to official figures, 58,000 refugees now reside in Greece. 11,000 of them are on the Aegean islands Lesbos, Chios and Samos.

Last week fourteen migrants from Lesbos were returned to Turkey: eight Syrians, four Pakistanis and two Algerians. …

Most poignant is the situation around the so-called emergency procedure. Part of the agreement was that newly arrived refugees would get clarity within 48 hours about their applications for asylum. …

Nothing like that happened, says Noorlander. “I have spoken to people in the camps who have been there for months and have just been told they will have to wait until December for their first asylum interview.” …

Why the difference between the Brussels [European Union] reality and the actual situation in Greece? The problem, according to Noorlander, is that the Brussels politicians and diplomats do not themselves come to see how things are in Lesbos.

Divisions rise inside EU at summit between Germany, France and Italy: here.

Norwegian anti-refugee fence at Russian border: here.

Persecution of Rohingyas in Myanmar


This video saus about itself:

20 August 2016

Who are the Rohingya refugees?

They are people with no home or citizenship. While the Myanmar government dispute the Rohingya people’s status as Burmese citizens, it’s indisputable that Rohingya people have been living in Burma for generations.

Refugees in Greece in trouble


This video says about itself:

‘Nobody is illegal’: Thousands protest in Europe against EU-Turkey refugee deal

17 March 2016

Thousands of people have demonstrated in Spain and other countries in protest against the draft agreement between Brussels and Ankara which could see the bulk of ‘illegal’ immigrants stuck in the EU sent back to Turkey.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Aegean island camps in crisis as refugee numbers mount

Thursday 18th August 2016

SAVE the Children warned yesterday that refugees in Greek island camps face terrible conditions as new arrivals increase sharply.

The British charity said more than 10,300 came ashore in the first two weeks of August, two-and-a-half times the figure for the same period in July.

Greece director Katie Dimmer said: “We’re starting to see scenes reminiscent of last summer, except, this time, most asylum-seekers are unable to continue their journeys and are trapped on the islands in overcrowded facilities and under the blazing sun.

“Mothers with small babies are being forced to sleep on the ground in makeshift tents. Children and breastfeeding women are suffering from dehydration.”

Meanwhile, the Greek coast guard was searching for a people-trafficking boat with 53 passengers that reported engine trouble in the eastern Aegean, hours after rescuing 59 refugees from a dinghy in rough weather north of Kos.

Refugee Olympic athletes honoured with mural


This video from Brazil says about itself:

Rio 2016: Refugee athletes honoured with mural

17 August 2016

Refugees competing at the Olympic Games have been honoured with a gigantic mural on Rio de Janeiro’s Olympic Boulevard.

Two street artists painted the 10 athletes in the refugee team. This is the first time a refugee team has been represented at the Games.

This video from Brazil says about itself:

Refugees living in Brazil cheer fellow refugees in Olympics

14 August 2016

Several members of the Congolese refugee community in Rio gathered to watch their compatriots compete in the Olympics as part of the first ever refugee team to take part in the games. The fans watched Popole Misenga and Yolande Mabika in jubilation as they competed in judo. The refugees community broke into song and dance as their compatriots took to the stage.

The Arab world, from Bush’s Iraq war to ISIS


This video from the USA says about itself:

“Fractured Lands: How the Arab World Came Apart“: NYT Mag Examines Region Since 2003 U.S. Invasion

12 August 2016

As conflicts from Iraq to Syria have forced a record 60 million people around the world to flee their homes and become refugees, we speak with Scott Anderson about his in-depth new report, “Fractured Lands: How the Arab World Came Apart.”

Occupying the entire print edition of this week’s New York Times Magazine, it examines what has happened in the region in the past 13 years since the the U.S. invaded Iraq through the eyes of six characters in Egypt, Libya, Syria, Iraq and Iraqi Kurdistan. Anderson is also author of the book, “Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East.”

Bush's mission accomplished in Iraq, cartoon

Last week, The New York Times Magazine devoted an entire issue to one story: Scott Anderson’s account of how the world has changed since the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003. Anderson’s narrative follows six characters from 1972 until the present: here.

Sexual abuse at Australian refugee camp


This CNN video says about itself:

Horrific abuse claims in Nauru detention center

10 August 2016

Kristie Lu Stout speaks to The Guardian‘s Paul Farrell about leaked documents, revealing horrific abuse in Australia’s offshore detention center.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Nauru: Refugees held in Australian camp endure abuse hell

Thursday 11th August 2016

LEAKED reports from Australia’s offshore refugee detention camp on Nauru published yesterday detail a litany of violent and sexual abuse.

The camp on the tiny, remote Pacific island nation was already notorious for its terrible conditions and neglect of inmates.

But more than 2,000 reports leaked to the Australian edition of the Guardian allege that detainees, including children, face assaults, sexual abuse and mental distress.

They document incidents such as guards threatening a boy with death and only allowing a young woman a longer shower in return for sexual favours.

Mental stress caused by prolonged detention was deemed to be the cause of self-harm cases, including a woman trying to hang herself and a girl sewing her lips together.

In 2014, one girl wrote in her school book: “I want DEATH” and “I need death.”

Former Save the Children caseworker Natasha Blucher denied that the charity was the source of the reports.

“However, now that this information is on the public record, it enables us to speak out in an unprecedented way,” she said.

Teacher Jane Willey, who recognised her own handwriting in some of the reports, said the published data was nowhere near the full extent of what had been written.

“What you are seeing here is just the tip of the iceberg,” Ms Willey, who worked for Save the Children on Nauru between July 2014 and March 2015.

“Seeing children refer to themselves as a boat number, seeing evidence of self-harm … I dread to think of how those kids are doing.”

German government sending refugees back to war zones


This video says about itself:

“Enough pain” – A Syrian refugee girl pleads for dignity | UNICEF

20 October 2015

“Enough… enough pain.” 15-year-old Syrian refugee Shaimae is crossing the Serbian border into Croatia with her mother and sisters. They are heading to Germany in the hopes of starting a new life. With a tear-filled plea about the deep impact fleeing has had on her, she says: “We just need someone to understand us, to help us.”

Find out more about Shaimae in this photoessay.

Find out more about our work on the refugee and migrant crisis here.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Germany refuses more refugees at border

Today, 10:39

Germany has this year refused more refugees entry at the border. They also deported more refugees.

In the first part of this year, more than 13,000 refugees were refused entry at the border. That’s 50% more than the same period last year. In total, nearly 21,000 people were deported in 2015.

The German government introduced a year ago border controls again because of the increasing flow of refugees. The political party Die Linke thinks it is unacceptable that so many people are sent back, especially when it concerns people from war zones such as Iraq and Syria.

German interior minister announces tightening of security and asylum laws: here.

Violent Borders: Refugees and the Right to Move by Reece Jones (Verso, £16.99). REECE JONES’S excellent new book renders visible something which has become so taken for granted that we don’t even see it — a global system of labour control that is utterly feudal in all but name: here.

‘PREGNANT AND AFRAID INSIDE GERMANY’S LARGEST REFUGEE CAMP’ “I’ve been thinking, what am I going to do when I give birth? Who’s going to stay with the kids? Who’s going to go with me to the hospital? I always had my family come with me when I gave birth in Iraq.” [Sonia Narang, HuffPost]