Donald Trump parody song


This 6 March 2016 parody music video from Britain is called Donald Trump – “Another 10ft on the Wall”.

It is a parody of the song Another brick in the wall by British band Pink Floyd.

The lyrics are:

We don’t need no state protection
We don’t need no border control
No dark-skinned children in our classrooms
Keep those kids in Mexico

Hey, America! I’ll even make ’em pay for it
If they don’t play ball, I’ll just put another ten feet on the wall
All in all, it’s just another ten feet on the wall

We don’t need no anchor babies
We don’t need no burritos
We don’t want no Muslims either
Send ’em all to Mexico

Hey, America! Watch me make ’em pay for it
If they don’t play ball, I’ll just put another ten feet on the wall
All in all, I’m just a loud-mouthed prick called Donald

Last week, Twitter retrieved the comic strip above — a 1999 Doonesbury classic in which Garry Trudeau, the strip’s creator, saw Trump-the-candidate coming a mile away. Trudeau has been drawing the racist presidential nominee since 1987. The strip is one of many collected in an anthology of cartoons called “Yuge! 30 Years of Doonesbury on Trump,” which came out in July. Trudeau responded to questions about the viral strip, his career and the book by email on Friday.: here

British Blairite Labour leader candidate Smith defeated, satiric song


This 24 September 2016 parody music video from Britain is called The Owen Smiths – “I Know It’s Over“.

It is about Blairite candidate for Labour leader Owen Smith‘s defeat by Jeremy Corbyn.

The song is a parody of the song by The Smiths: “I Know It’s Over“.

The lyrics are:

Oh boyo, I can feel the soil falling over my head
And now my leadership hopes are dead
Oh well, ‘nuff said

I know it’s over, still I sing
I don’t know where else I can go, boyo

Oh boyo, I can feel the soil falling over my head
Jeremy said he would let me back into the shadow cabinet
But I must ride off into the sunset
Don’t cry for me, please be happy
My tears will drench the back benches
Loud, loutish members of Momentum
They love Jeremy more than they love me

I know it’s over, still I sing
I don’t know where else I can go
It’s over, it’s over, it’s over
I know it’s over and it never really begun
But in my heart it was so real
And if I could speak to myself I’d say:

If you’re so radical, then why are you on your own tonight?
If you’re such a socialist, then why are you on your own tonight?
If you’re so very electable, then why are you on your own tonight?
And if you’re so very fit for purpose, then why are you on your own tonight?

JEREMY CORBYN’S emphatic victory yesterday will fill his many supporters with joy. With 61.8 per cent of the vote, Corbyn has received an even larger mandate to lead the biggest party in British politics than he did this time last year. This is remarkable. Because since the Islington North MP, veteran campaigner for peace, social justice and equality and long-term Morning Star weekly columnist was first elected to lead the Labour Party a year ago, he has been under constant attack: here.

Corbyn’s victory was achieved in the teeth of a coup attempt led by the party’s Blairite wing, supported by the vast majority of the party’s MPs and backed by every one of Britain’s TV channels and major newspapers, including Britain’s state broadcaster the BBC, and the nominally liberal Guardian: here.

Lost Alma-Tadema painting found again


The lost Alma Tadema painting, being hanged at the Fries Museum exhibition, photo by Marchje Andringa

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

A lost painting by Dutch-British painter Lawrence Alma-Tadema has surfaced in the BBC television program Antiques Roadshow.

Alma-Tadema was in the 19th century one of the most successful painters in the world. He was born in the Frisian village Dronryp, and later moved to London and became a naturalized Englishman. Alma-Tadema, who died in 1913, is buried in St. Paul’s Cathedral in London.

Bewilderment

The painting shows the engraver Leopold Löwenstein. Alma-Tadema gave it to Löwenstein’s wife. She was the nanny of the painter’s daughters. In 1913 the painting was last seen in public. A great-grandson of the engraver took it to the Antiques Roadshow, where the discovery caused bewilderment.

The episode of Antiques Roadshow will be broadcast tomorrow night on BBC One. Then the value of the painting will also be disclosed. The painting was restored after the discovery and added by the Fries Museum to their exhibition about Alma-Tadema which opens on 1 October.

This 20 September 2016 video is about that Alma Tadema exhibition, and the inspiration by that painter on Hollywood films about antiquity.