Sand lizards of the Veluwe region, videos


This 19 July 2016 video from the Veluwe region in the Netherlands shows a male sand lizard.

This 17 July 2016 video from the Veluwe region in the Netherlands shows a female sand lizard.

This 19 July 2016 video from the Veluwe region in the Netherlands shows a female sand lizard.

Avoiding snakebite harm


This video from the USA says about itself:

14 August 2015

The bull snake hissing, rattling its tail, striking, and all its charms in this video of treasures found and released all over the Great Plains.

From eNature Blog in the USA:

Do You Know How To Treat A Snakebite?

Posted on Friday, July 15, 2016 by eNature

It’s the height of summer and folks throughout the country are visiting parks, hiking through the woods, or otherwise enjoying the outdoors. At the same time, lots of other, non-human, creatures are on the move.

Chances are high you might encounter a snake or two if you’re out. But don’t panic— they’re actually pretty harmless creatures.

Even in areas where there are many venomous snake species, few people ever encounter them, and fewer yet run any real risk of being bitten. Most snakes, even the ones with the worst reputations, will choose to flee when they sense your presence. Snakes usually bite as a last resort.

Remember, fangs and venom evolved primarily for prey capture, not as a defense mechanism. Most snakebites in this country come as a result of people trying to handle or otherwise harass or move the snake; avoid this type of behavior and you will probably never get bitten.

How To Avoid Snakebites

Here are some steps you can take to avoid snakebites:

-Before venturing out into the wilderness, familiarize yourself with the snakes of your area, both venomous and non-venomous species.
-Learn which habitats the venomous species in your region are likely to be encountered in, and use caution when in those habitats.
-Always take a buddy into the field with you.
-Wear boots and loose-fitting pants if you are venturing into venomous snake territory.
-Try as much as possible not to take a snake by surprise. Stay on trails, and watch where you place your hands and feet, especially when climbing or stepping over fences, large rocks, and logs, or when collecting firewood.

How To Treat Snakebites

Despite what we often see in moves or television, venomous snakebites are rare—and if they do happen, they’re are rarely fatal to humans. Of the 8,000 snakebite victims in the United States each year, only about 10 to 15 die. However, for any snakebite the best course of action is to get medical care as soon as possible.

And unlike in movies—never try to suck the venom out of wound with your mouth. Nothing good will come of doing that. Instead, follow the steps below:

-Try to keep the snakebite victim still, as movement helps the venom spread through the body.
-Keep the injured body part motionless and just below heart level.
-Keep the victim warm, calm, and at rest, and transport him or her immediately to medical care. Do not allow him to eat or drink anything.
-If medical care is more than half an hour away, wrap a bandage a few inches above the bite, keeping it loose enough to enable blood flow (you should be able to fit a finger beneath it). Do not cut off blood flow with a tight tourniquet. Leave the bandage in place until reaching medical care.
– If you have a snakebite kit, wash the bite, and place the kit’s suction device over the bite. (Do not suck the poison out with your mouth.) Do not remove the suction device until you reach a medical facility.
– Try to identify the snake so the proper antivenin can be administered, but do not waste time or endanger yourself trying to capture or kill it.
-If you are alone and on foot, start walking slowly toward help, exerting the injured area as little as possible. If you run or if the bite has delivered a large amount of venom, you may collapse, but a snakebite seldom results in death.

Cape Verde islands bird conservation


This video says about itself:

Biosfera: Protecting the desert islands (Cape Verde: Santa Luzia, Raso, Branco)

16 June 2016

Cape Verde: a volcanic archipelago, a developing nation. 600km off the coast of West Africa.

Santa Luzia, Raso, Branco: one remote desert island and its two rocky islets are a unique remnant piece of Cape Verdean wilderness, now threatened. They must be protected:

– Thousands of nesting endemic seabirds
Raso Lark (facing extinction)
Loggerhead Sea Turtles (Vulnerable)

A passionate and dedicated team is strengthening every day to save these species and restore their remote island homes.

Biosfera, with the support of SPEA (the Portuguese Society for the Protection of Birds; BirdLife Partner), have received conservation grants from the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF). This video shows the progress they have made for the conservation of the desert islands and in the building up of their organisation. And of course it shows the beautiful wildlife of the islands…

Music:

Cordas do Sol (used with permission):
Rebas (Instrumental)
Lume D’Lenha
Sho Pardal
Manhe Joana

Kevin MacLeod incompetech.com (CC):

Digya
At the Shore

© BirdLife International / CEPF 2016

From BirdLife:

Winning hearts and minds in Cape Verde

By Shaun Hurrell, 19 July 2016

Conservation work in these desert islands delivers heartening, long lasting, results: “Now the fishermen work with us, they help us count the birds instead of killing them. They even adopt turtle nests. It is a big, big change.”

Piercing sun, dry, rocky ground, and a solitary ex-military canvas tent ripped bare by strong Atlantic winds. Off the rocky shore, an osprey is seen diving for a fish. In the shade, dust sprays as sparrows can be seen scuffling for water dripping from the tent’s fresh water barrel tap. This is the scene on arrival on Raso, after six hours of a sea-sickening boat ride. Not the place you’d expect to find the entire population of a Critically Endangered lark, let alone a small passionate team of conservationists there to protect it and other unique endemic species from extinction.

A volcanic archipelago 600km off the coast of West Africa, Cape Verde is a developing nation. Surrounded by sharks and coral reefs, the desert island of Santa Luzia and its two rocky islets Raso and Branco are a unique remnant piece of Cape Verdean wilderness, too remote for permanent inhabitation.

However, thousands of nesting endemic seabirds, such as the Cape Verde Shearwater; the Endangered Giant Wall Gecko, and nesting Loggerhead Sea Turtles (Vulnerable), also make these islands their homes. But it doesn’t mean they are safe from threats.

One of the most threatened birds in the world, the Raso Lark is suffering from climate change effects, whereby hurricanes and drought can wipe out a lot of the minimal grasses on which it feeds. On this 7 km2 islet in 2006, the population dropped to 70 birds. The dedicated conservationists are a local NGO, Biosfera, who is working with the support of SPEA (the Portuguese Society for the Protection of Birds; BirdLife Partner) and volunteers to restore nearby Santa Luzia (which has similar vegetation and is much larger) for a translocation of the Raso Lark to help it bounce back to its original numbers.

Poaching is another threat. Fishermen used to come to these islands to take ‘boatloads’ of Cape Verde Shearwaters and female Loggerhead Turtles that nest on the beaches.

In the past, Tommy Melo Melo, Co-Founder of Biosfera, has camped out on Branco to protect turtles from poachers, and when his food ran out, he risked shark-infested waters to freedive for fish.

“Now the fishermen work with us,” he says. “They help us to count the birds in the nests for example.” They now even adopt turtle nests. “It was a big, big change.”

Tommy has a vision: “A huge marine protected area in Cape Verde that includes the three islands.” To reach this has so far involved years of work: from walking along beaches kilometres every day to guard nesting turtles and relocate their eggs to a hatchery to increase their chances of survival, to building the organisation’s ornithological expertise and capacity to work with government and large international conservation projects.

Thanks to the support of SPEA through grants from the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF), Biosfera has grown and grown.

“Biosfera is a fantastic organisation,” says Pedro Geraldes, Project Coordinator, SPEA. “They started just as father and son working together to protect these islands.”

“Before we were an NGO in the name. Now we are an NGO properly,” says Tommy.

Now, they aim to work in partnership with the government to manage the marine reserve.

“We are the link between the fishermen and the government,” says Patricia Rendall-Rocha, Coordinator, Biosfera.

Recorded on a field visit by CEPF, this video [top of this blog post] shows the progress Biosfera have made for the conservation of the desert islands and in the building up of their organisation. And of course it shows the island’s beautiful wildlife.

Since the field visit, Biosfera have been awarded a follow-up grant from CEPF to continue building their capacity in financial operations and communications. Now they are conducting further field research and investigating the impact of invasive fire ants which have ended up on Raso Islet, threatening the Raso Lark and other endemic species. Tommy, Patricia and Pedro say the major translocation of the Raso Lark is within their sights.

As part of the support to grantees, the CEPF Regional Implementation Team conduct field visits, like this one to Cape Verde. In this phase of the programme, Project Officers have been on supervision missions to Algeria, Morocco, Montenegro, Albania, Bosnia and Hercegovina and Macedonia.

“The CEPF support and the communication with the Regional Implementation Team was really good in terms of dealing with this project’s difficulties,” said Pedro Geraldes, SPEA. “Because it is remote, some plans have to be changed and altered.”

South African wildlife scenes, video


This video from South Africa says about itself:

Latest Sightings – Watch the Latest, Exclusive and Most Incredible Wildlife Footage

27 June 2016

This gives you a small taste of the type of footage you can expect on our channel if you hit that subscribe button!:)

Watch each video here [click on URLs]:

1. Lion Roaring – 0:13
2. Brown Snake Eagle vs Snake – 0:20
3. Leopard Does Acrobatics – 0:23
4. Buffaloes attack Lion – 0:28
5. Leopard Killing Wildebeest – 0:30
6. Snake vs Chameleon – 0:33
7. Black rhino vs Wild Dogs – 0:39
8. Don’t mess with an angry lioness – 0:42
9. Mating Leopards – 0:46
10. Rhino vs Birds – 0:54
11. Lions Ambush Zebra – 0:58
12. Snake That Can’t Slither – 1:03
13. Rhino Charges Car – 1:05
14. Lions Attack Crocodile – 1:16
15. Bird Takes on Hungry Leopard – 1:20
16. Fighting Monitor Lizards – 1:27
17. Leopard Meets GoPro – 1:32
18. Buffalo Attacks and Stabs Lion – 1:39
19. Leopard Surprise Attack – 1:47