NATO’s ‘new’ Libya, bloodshed continues


This video says about itself:

Detained by Militias: Libya‘s Migrant Trade (Part 1)

15 September 2015

In a desperate bid to seek a better life in Europe, thousands of refugees and migrants leave the shores of Libya and cross the perilous Mediterranean Sea every month. Over 2,000 people have died making the journey in 2015 alone.

The routes to and journey through Libya are also dangerous, however, and since the fall of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011, the country has struggled to achieve and maintain stability. Porous desert borders, rival fighters, and weak governance have left much of Libya in complete chaos.

With militias controlling large swathes of land, their attentions have turned to the people who cross their territories. The fighters assert they are bringing order to the country as they detain the refugees, yet these people’s lives have become valuable commodities to the militias as they try to solidify their positions in the country.

VICE News secured exclusive access to a camp outside Tripoli, run by a militia that has seized hundreds of migrants. Food is scarce, dehydration and disease is rife, and control comes in the form of whips and warning shots. The militia claims to have the migrants’ interests at heart, but what emerges is a very different story.

In part one of a two-part series, VICE News examines how Libya is struggling with the Mediterranean migrant crisis, where state-run detention centers are overcrowded and violent, and how government immigration controls are outsourced to militias, where they detain migrants en masse.

This video is called Kidnapped and Sold: Libya’s Migrant Trade (Part 2).

In the ‘new’ Libya created by the 2011 NATO war, there is slavery now.

And the bloodshed continues.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV: today

At least 20 dead by fights in Tripoli, airport closed

In fighting between rival paramilitary groups in the Libyan capital Tripoli, at least twenty people have been killed today. Dozens were injured. It is the most fierce fighting in Tripoli in recent months.

Mitiga airport has been closed for an indefinite time. A few parked aircraft were damaged. The international airport of Tripoli was destroyed in 2014 and put out of use. Mitiga, originally a military airport, has since been used as a civilian airport as well. …

Both the airport and the prison are controlled by Rada, a self-appointed anti-terror unit that falls under the Ministry of the Interior of the Unity Government [one of various governments in Libya]. The attack was carried out by rival fighters from Tajoura, east of Tripoli.

Tripoli had been in the hands of several rival militias since the deposition of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011.

A double car bombing in Libya has left at least 22 people dead and 30 wounded: here.

AT LEAST 33 people died in a twin car bombing that struck the Libyan city of Benghazi last night: here.

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How European Union xenophobia kills Africans


This video says about itself:

The EU Silently Welcomes Slavery In Libya

1 December 2017

The European Union was awarded the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize “for over six decades [having] contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe.”

At the same time, EU officials know that once refugees can’t make it to Europe—whether because they become enslaved in Libya or are too fearful to make the trip—they are no longer a problem for the Union.

Translated from Bram Vermeulen, Dutch NOS TV correspondent in Africa:

“You must forgive me”, words to never forget

Today, 09:36

The story of 2017 that stays with me the most was told to us on the floor of one of the ghettos in the caravan city of Agadez in Niger.

Thermo Amadou from Guinea and Diallo Mamdou Djulde told about the day when the Toyota Hilux left them and 23 others in the vast desert near the border between Niger and Libya. The driver had deviated from the route that smugglers have been using for decades between Agadez and the Libyan border.

On that route, since the beginning of the year, there are roadblocks and policemen trained by the European agency Eucap, which settled in Agadez to stop the migration to Europe. The consequence of this pressure from Brussels is that the smugglers now prefer the unpaved roads through the Sahara.

The driver of Amadou and his travel companion after a day of driving lacked petrol. In order to refuel he would drive back to the official route, but with 25 migrants in the trunk, he would certainly be arrested. So you wait here, he said. “I’ll be right back.”

Most of them got out of the trunk. Thermo Amadou remained seated. Until Pappi, the muscular Congolese persuaded him to trust the driver. “Otherwise we will all die here.” The driver never came back. They waited for him a full day.

Then they started walking. With two jerry cans containing 5 liters of water, connected to a rope that he had wrapped around his neck. Back to Agadez. Following the tracks of the Toyota Hilux. On the seventh day the Senegalese Pap Djah gave up. “Leave me behind here”, he begged the others. They had already carried him forward on his shoulders for a day. “Il faut me pardonner”, he said. “You must forgive me.”

Thermo Amadou had never forgotten those words. “Il faut me pardonner”. He sat on a stone in Agadez’s ghetto, and Diallo sat next to him with hollow eyes. They were crying. They walked nine days to tell this story. Two others did not survive the journey on foot. They buried them in the Sahara sand.

While I listened to their story together with colleague and cameraman Sven Torfinn, I told myself to never forget those words of the Senegalese Pap Djah. Every time migration from Africa to Europe is discussed again by policymakers, angry tweeps, and opinion makers at the talk show tables far from Agadez. Those apologetic words from the Senegalese minutes before his death. “Il faut me pardonner”.

Stop slavery in Libya, The Hague, 18 December


This 24 November 2017 video is called The football world did not remain silent on slave trade in Libya.

From In-EUmanity Amsterdam and No Border Network in the Netherlands:

Monday 18 December 2017 14:00 till 16:00

Europahuis, Korte Vijverberg 5/6 2513 AB The Hague

Stop Europe Funding Slavery in Libya: Stop Wars on Migrants

We are going to organize action days against European funding of atrocities in Libya.

In Libya, everyday migrants are imprisoned in private detention centers, tortured and sold as slaves. They suffer extreme exploitation and violence.

Europe [rather: the European Union] is funding the expansion of these detention centers. Meanwhile by implementing the Malta agreement, Europe is training and technically supplying the Libyan “coastguard” to carry out illegal refoulements that they call “rescue operations”.

We stand up against the criminal regime of Fortress Europe.

We demand the immediate cessation of the funding of the Libyan torturers.

End slavery and detention in Libya.

Free passage, healthcare and protection to all the victims of torture and trafficking.

Common Day of Action on the 18th of December, International Day of Migrants

A video of the demonstration is here. One of the speeches is here.

European Union helps torturing refugees in Libya


This video says about itself:

Libya’s slave trade – ‘They sell Africans over there’

28 November 2017

The world’s most vulnerable, fleeing war and poverty back home, are being abused and auctioned off as slaves – a shocking danger facing migrants and refugees in Libya.

It has been reported that hundreds of people are being auctioned in modern day slave markets in Libya for as little as $400.

Libya is the main transit hub for refugees and migrants attempting to reach southern Europe by sea. They are coming from countries like Nigeria, Eritrea, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Gambia, Senegal, Sudan and Somalia.

The power vacuum in Libya after the fall of Muammar Gaddafi has made human trafficking and people smuggling a booming trade.

And the European Union’s renewed strategy to stop migrants and refugees travelling across the Mediterranean has led to more people being stuck in the north African country without money or food.

Al Jazeera’s Bernard Smith reports.

By Alex Lantier:

Amnesty International report exposes EU role in mass torture of refugees in Libya

13 December 2017

In order to keep masses of refugees from reaching Europe, the European Union (EU) is helping build, fund and equip a vast network of prison camps in which refugees are arbitrarily detained, beaten, tortured, sexually assaulted, sold into slavery and murdered. This is the conclusion of a harrowing Amnesty International (AI) report published yesterday, titled “Libya’s Dark Web of Collusion.”

The horrific abuses detailed in the AI report are already well known. Protests erupted in North Africa, France and worldwide last month, after CNN broadcast videos of human traffickers selling refugees into slavery in Libya. However, AI’s extensively documented report, based on government documents and dozens of interviews with refugees, underscores not only the vast scope of this barbaric prison system, but the key role of EU technical and financial support.

Moreover, while the AI report says very little about NATO’s 2011 war in Libya, it makes clear that the origins of this prison system lie in the wave of imperialist wars across the Middle East and Africa and the ensuing global refugee crisis. The people-smugglers that operate prison camps in Libya are mostly militias that NATO backed against Gaddafi during the war, and that took power after NATO destroyed the Gaddafi regime.

This is a devastating indictment of the pundits, academics and pseudo left parties like France’s New Anti-capitalist Party or the International Socialist Organization in the United States that hailed the war in Libya as a humanitarian intervention to aid a democratic revolution. While they claimed that imperialist war would bring democracy and freedom to Libya, it brought slavery, rape and murder.

According to International Organization on Migration (IOM) statistics cited by AI, at least 416,556 refugees were trapped in Libya in September 2017. Of these, over 60 percent are from sub-Saharan Africa, 32 percent are from North Africa, and 7 percent from Asia and the Middle East. The EU is working with militias and criminal gangs to keep them in Libya.

The strategy was codified in the February 2017 Malta Declaration, in which the EU endorsed and vowed to support Italian cooperation with Libyan authorities against refugees. This involved funding, training and arming border guards and the Libyan Coast Guard (LCG) to block refugee departures, and “upgrading and financing” so-called “reception centres” where refugees captured by the LCG are detained. Also, AI notes, the EU has “struck deals with Libyan local authorities and the leaders of tribes and armed groups—to encourage them to stop the smuggling of people.”

As a result, AI notes, refugee departures from Libya are collapsing: “In the first semester of 2017 a total of 83,754 people had reached Italy by sea, a significant increase over the same period in 2016, when 70,222 arrivals were recorded. However, the trend then changed dramatically: between July and November 2017 a total of 33,288 refugees and migrants arrived in Italy, 67 percent fewer than in the same period of 2016, when 102,786 arrived.”

With EU assistance, tens of thousands of refugees are being thrown into prison camps where they are subjected to beatings, torture and murder. Currently, AI writes, “about 20,000 refugees and migrants are detained in centres normally managed by the General Directorate for Combating Illegal Migration (DCIM)”, an EU-funded branch of the Libyan Interior Ministry. As Libya does not have a functioning judicial system since Gaddafi’s overthrow, AI adds, refugees are “deprived of any formal administrative or judicial means of challenging their detention.”

AI cites testimony from many refugees who escaped to Italy from camps in Libya. Mariam from Eritrea said the guards “were hard; they were drunk all the time. Then one day there were four Somalis who tried to escape. The Eritrean smugglers told us they killed them, three of them; the fourth [was] in the hospital.

“Then they beat the rest of the Somalis. [They were] getting tortured; you could hear the screaming. They used electricity and beat them with Kalashnikov [rifles].”

Samir from Sudan described how he escaped from the DCIM’s Nasser detention center, but his friends did not and were sold into debt bondage: “The electricity was out and there was no water, so they took us outside to gather water. Me and two other friends—we ran; they shot after us but we were fast. … The other three were bailed out by the Sudanese man and they have to work to pay off 4,500 Libyan dinars to the factory owner.”

Ousman from Gambia described a DCIM detention center in Tripoli: “I saw many people dying in prison, either because they fell sick or were beaten … Guards were Libyan—they used to beat everybody, without a reason. Before entering the prison, police search you and take away all money, phone, everything.” He added, “I saw one boy in the prison—they gave him a phone to call his family, and they beat him with a metal stick while [he was] on the phone, on arms and everywhere…after five months I escaped with other people, but the guards started shooting and many were killed. I don’t now how many were killed, but I saw some falling and screaming.”

Mohamed, a Bangladeshi steelworker living in Libya, said: “A group of Libyans came in the shop one day and said they had work for us. Three of us went with them. There were three of them. We got in the car with them. They told me to put my head down, and not look; they became aggressive. They took us to a place, next to a factory. When they took us inside, there were about 500 people, it was one big place filled with people. … They beat me with a metal rod; it broke my fingers [he showed deformed fingers on his right hand]. I have problems with my right leg also and my shoulder because of the beating. One guy was beaten to death in front of my eyes. I stayed there for 20 days. I then paid 2,000 US dollars to get out; my friends managed to collect the money.”

The NATO war in Libya and the country’s ensuing collapse into a bloody civil war are searing lessons in the reactionary role of imperialism. The EU’s foreign policy has emerged from the Libyan war completely criminalized, using the most barbaric methods to deny refugees’ right to asylum. The EU is complicit in the torture of refugees not only in that it provides support to DCIM to operate its semi-official prison camps in Libya; EU naval aid to train and arm the LCG, as well as deals cut with various regional or local militias that control prison facilities, also play a key role.

AI explains, “The LCG’s increased capacity, due to support from EU member states, has led to an increasing number of such pull-back operations. So far in 2017, 19,452 people have been intercepted by LCG and taken back to Libya. When the LCG intercept boats at sea, they bring refugees and migrants back to Libyan shores and routinely transfer them to DCIM detention centres.”

AI singled out a particular deal between Italy, the former colonial power, and influential warlord Khalifa Haftar: “Italian government representatives also discussed measures to reduce irregular migratory movements with Khalifa Haftar, the head of the self-styled Libyan National Army, which controls the east of the country. Haftar visited Italy on 26 September 2017 to meet with the Italian Ministers of Interior and Defence.”

Militarism and crackdown on refugees dominate EU summit: here.

From NATO war to Libyan slavery


This video says about itself:

Should NATO Answer for Libya’s Slave Trade?

2 December 2017

CNN has revealed that African migrants are being sold at slave auctions in Libya for as little as $400. As the UN weighs sanctions, professor and author Horace Campbell says the NATO powers who tore Libya apart should own up to their responsibility.

As EU policies drive migrants away, Libyan authorities push them into dire detention centres. For some who reach Europe, it is worth the risk: here.

Libyan hell for African refugees


This video says about itself:

SLAVE TRADE IN LIBYA | SHOCKING DOCUMENTARY

28 November 2017

KINDLY WATCH AND SHARE! SPREAD THE AWARENESS..STOP SLAVE TRADE IN LIBYA!!

I bumped into this documentary and I decided to upload it on YouTube so as to shed more light on what is going on in Libya. Ross Kemp covered this months ago and till now, no European or Western country has condemned the act. We need to stop the Slave Trade in Libya!!

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Hundreds of thousands of migrants face inhuman conditions in Libya

Friday 1st December 2017

UP TO 700,000 African migrants are suffering “inhuman” conditions in Libyan camps, African Union (AU) commission chairman Moussa Faki Mahamat said yesterday.

Mr Mahamat spoke at the end of a summit between the AU and European Union where migration was a top issue.

He said that 3,800 people in one camp in Tripoli need to be removed as soon as possible.

“That’s just one camp,” he said. “The Libyan government has told us there are 42” and some contain even more people.

Several stories about African refugees being sold at open-air slave markets in Libya have been published recently in Western media.

However, there have often been reports of black Africans being horrendously abused and killed since Nato overthrew the Libyan government in 2011, plunging the country into bloody chaos.

Oxfam said yesterday that a EU deal to support Libya’s coastguard, agreed at the joint summit, would lead to many refugees trying to reach Europe being returned to “violence and abuse” in Libya.

Libyan slavery and the European Union


This video says about itself:

The EU Silently Welcomes Slavery In Libya

1 December 2017

The European Union was awarded the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize “for over six decades [having] contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe.”

At the same time, EU officials know that once refugees can’t make it to Europe—whether because they become enslaved in Libya or are too fearful to make the trip—they are no longer a problem for the Union.

The European Union (EU) and African Union (AU) held a joint summit November 29-30 in Abidjan in the Ivory Coast. The meeting was overshadowed by the unfolding disaster caused by imperialist wars in Libya and the Sahel region, and escalating neo-colonial interventions of the EU powers, particularly France. It brought together leaders of 50 African and European countries to concentrate on EU plans to block immigration from Africa and, without saying it openly, to undermine China’s growing influence in the continent. In the lead-up to the summit, protests erupted across Africa and in France against the barbaric treatment of African refugees by the Islamist militias controlling Libya, where CNN filmed the operations of slave markets that have re-appeared since the 2011 NATO war. After these protests, African regimes withdrew their diplomats from Tripoli. The reappearance of slavery expresses the political essence of European imperialism’s neo-colonial intervention in Africa: here.