Red squirrel prepares for winter, video

This video from the Netherlands says about itself (translated):

1 December 2015

13-year-old Niklas Haverkate filmed this red squirrel, looking between the autumnal foliage for food for his winter stock.

Thousands of beluga whales, video

This video says about itself:

23 November 2015

Season 16 Episode 2: Drone Art

Arctic Watch photographer Nansen Weber undertook the mission of filming on the Northwest Passage with the use of a drone.

Nansen spent four weeks filming at Arctic Watch and around Somerset Island. This video aims to share some of the magical wonders of the Northwest Passage – the beluga congregation of Cunningham Inlet, the polar bears living in the environment and the unique landscapes of this hidden gem in Canada.

Nansen Weber is the first to film high Arctic wildlife with the use of a drone.

Shot uniquely on the coast of Somerset Island, this video showcases one of the last beluga nurseries on earth – Cunningham Inlet. Nearly two thousand whales congregate annually within this inlet.

Young otters at camera trap, video

This 4 November 2015 camera trap video from Kraanlanden nature reserve in Friesland province in the Netherlands shows three young otters.

Harrie Bosma made the video.

Most threatened primates top 25

This video from the USA is called RED RUFFED LEMURS at DUKE LEMUR CENTER.

From AFP news agency:

Over half of world’s primates on brink of extinction: experts

24 Nov 2015 at 08:55 ET

More than half the world’s primates, including apes, lemurs and monkeys, are facing extinction, international experts warned Tuesday, as they called for urgent action to protect mankind’s closest living relatives.

The population crunch is the result of large-scale habitat destruction — particularly the burning and clearing of tropical forests — as well as the hunting of primates for food and the illegal wildlife trade.

Species long-known to be at risk, including the Sumatran orangutan, have been joined on the most endangered list for the first time by the Philippine tarsier and the Lavasoa Mountains dwarf lemur from Madagascar, scientists meeting in Singapore said.

“This research highlights the extent of the danger facing many of the world’s primates,” leading primatologist Christoph Schwitzer, director of conservation at Bristol Zoological Society in Britain, said in a statement.

“We hope it will focus people’s attention on these lesser known primate species, some of which most people will probably have never heard of.”

This includes the Lavasoa Mountains dwarf lemur — a species only discovered two years ago — and the Roloway monkey from Ghana and Ivory Coast, which experts say “are on the very verge of extinction”.

There are 703 species and sub-species of primates in the world.

Madagascar and Vietnam are home to large numbers of highly threatened primate species, the statement said.

In Africa, the red colobus monkey was under “particular threat”, as were some of South America’s howler monkeys and spider monkeys, it added.

“All of these species are relatively large and conspicuous, making them prime targets for bushmeat hunting,” the statement said.

Russell Mittermeier, chair of the Species Survival Commission of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), said he hoped the report would encourage governments to commit to “desperately needed biodiversity conservation measures”.

Mittermeier said ahead of next month’s global climate conference in Paris, there was growing evidence some primate species might play key roles in dispersing tropical forest tree seeds, which in turn “have a critically important role in mitigating climate change”.

Here is the list of the world’s top 25 most endangered primates for 2014-2016 and their estimated numbers remaining in the wild.

The list is compiled by the IUCN, Bristol Zoological Society, International Primatological Society and Conservation International and is updated every two years:

Lavasoa Mountains dwarf lemur — unknown

Lake Alaotra bamboo lemur — about 2,500-5,000

Red ruffed lemur — unknown

Northern sportive lemur — around 50

Perrier’s sifaka — 1,700-2,600

Rondo dwarf galago — unknown but remaining habitat is just 100 square kilometres (40 square miles)

Roloway monkey — unknown but thought to be on the very verge of extinction

Preuss’ red colobus monkey — unknown

Tana River red colobus monkey — 1,000 and declining

Grauer’s gorilla — 2,000-10,000

Philippine tarsier — unknown

Javan slow loris — unknown

Pig-tailed langur — 3,300

Cat Ba langur (golden headed langur) — 60

Delacour’s langur — 234-275

Tonkin snub-nosed monkey — less than 250

Kashmir grey langur — unknown

Western purple-faced langur — unknown

Hainan gibbon — 25

Sumatran orangutan — 6,600

Ka’apor capuchin — unknown

San Martin titi monkey — unknown

Northern brown howler monkey — less than 250 mature animals

Colombian brown spider monkey — unknown

Ecuadorian brown-headed spider monkey — unknown

Whales and their parasites, new study

This video from the USA says about itself:

Parasite Found In House Cats Showing Up In Arctic Whales

15 February 2014

Researchers believe an influx of house cats to the Arctic is responsible for the spread of Toxoplama gondii to whales.

From Parasitology Research:

23 November 2015

Endoparasite survey of free-swimming baleen whales (Balaenoptera musculus, B. physalus, B. borealis) and sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) using non/minimally invasive methods

Carlos Hermosilla, Liliana M. R. Silva, Sonja Kleinertz, Rui Prieto, Monica A. Silva, Anja Taubert


A number of parasitic diseases have gained importance as neozoan opportunistic infections in the marine environment. Here, we report on the gastrointestinal endoparasite fauna of three baleen whale species and one toothed whale: blue (Balaenoptera musculus), fin (Balaenoptera physalus), and sei whales (Balaenoptera borealis) and sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) from the Azores Islands, Portugal. In total, 17 individual whale fecal samples [n = 10 (B. physalus); n = 4 (P. macrocephalus); n = 2 (B. musculus); n = 1 (B. borealis)] were collected from free-swimming animals as part of ongoing studies on behavioral ecology.

Furthermore, skin biopsies were collected from sperm whales (n = 5) using minimally invasive biopsy darting and tested for the presence of Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, and Besnoitia besnoiti DNA via PCR. Overall, more than ten taxa were detected in whale fecal samples. Within protozoan parasites, Entamoeba spp. occurred most frequently (64.7 %), followed by Giardia spp. (17.6 %) and Balantidium spp. (5.9 %). The most prevalent metazoan parasites were Ascaridida indet. spp. (41.2 %), followed by trematodes (17.7 %), acanthocephalan spp., strongyles (11.8 %), Diphyllobotrium spp. (5.9 %), and spirurids (5.9 %).

Helminths were mainly found in sperm whales, while enteric protozoan parasites were exclusively detected in baleen whales, which might be related to dietary differences. No T. gondii, N. caninum, or B. besnoiti DNA was detected in any skin sample. This is the first record on Giardia and Balantidium infections in large baleen whales.

Beaver builds lodge in Dutch Friesland

This video is about a beaver building a lodge in Dutch Friesland on 7 November 2015. That is unique for that province.

Harrie Bosma made this camera trap video.