Wild boar family in the Netherlands


This 28 May 2016 video by Michael de Vries from Ede in the Netherlands shows a wild boar family, which the video maker met for the third time.

Again, compared to last time, the piglets had grown a bit.

Elephant calf rescued from drain in Sri Lanka


This video says about itself:

29 May 2016

A young elephant has been rescued from an uncovered drain in Sri Lanka’s Hambantota port.

Locals workers joined forces with wildlife officials to use an array of basic tools to carry out the rescue operation.

The animal was taken away for treatment with a suspected broken leg.

Bearded reedlings, marsh harriers and roe deer


This 5 May 2016 video is about the Beningerslikken nature reserve in the Netherlands.

We went there, and to the Spuimonding West nature reserve adjacent to it, on 28 May 2016.

This video is about Spuimonding West.

This video is about Spuimonding West and Beningerslikken.

So is this one.

And this one.

A barn swallow flying.

We saw two ringed plovers. Later, we would see a flock of hundreds of them.

Redshanks. Northern lapwings.

Shelducks. Oystercatchers.

Teal. Great crested grebe.

Barnacle geese. A swift flying.

Meadow pipits.

Avocets. Gadwall ducks.

Canada geese swimming with goslings. Behind them, a mute swan and a red-breasted merganser.

A Cetti’s warbler sings.

A goshawk lands on a tree.

A male marsh harrier flying.

A female reed bunting. Later, males as well.

Reed warblers and sedge warblers sing.

So does a bluethroat.

This video shows a Beningerslikken bluethroat.

Then, a highlight: four or five bearded reedlings balancing on reed stems.

A female marsh harrier. A buzzard.

A hare.

Two roe deer running across the footpath.

This video shows Beningerslikken roe deer running.

Edible frog sound.

Yellow iris flowers.

A female stonechat.

A willow warbler sings.

A yellow wagtail.

Finally, two spoonbills foraging.

This video is also about the Beningerslikken and its wildlife.

So is this video.

And this one.

Brave blackbird and cat video


This video shows a male blackbird and a cat at food in a garden in the Netherlands.

Aad and Rianne made this video.

Little girl meets baby rhino


This video from Kenya says about itself:

Young Girl Goes For A Stroll With Endangered Southern White Rhino Named Ringo

20 May 2016

On Ol Pejeta, children get an incredible chance to meet Ringo the rhino. They get up close and personal with him and learn about wildlife and conservation. This is the future. Only if we teach our children to respect and appreciate animals will we be able to turn the tide of extinction. So bring your child to Ol Pejeta and teach them to be kind.

See also here.

Saudi Arabian anti-cat witchhunt


This video from the USA says about itself:

Saudi Arabia Bans Cat Pictures For Being Too ‘Western’

26 May 2016

A prominent Saudi cleric has declared photographs with cats, and other animals, forbidden unless completely necessary due to an upsurge in Saudis “who want to be like Westerners.”

On a televised broadcast, Sheikh Saleh Bin Fawzan Al-Fazwan, a member of the Saudi Council of Senior Scholars, was told about “a new trend of taking pictures with cats has been spreading among people who want to be like Westerners.”

Read more here.

I beg your pardon. Cats ‘Western’!? Domestic cats originated in ancient Egypt, now a mainly Arab and Islamic country. Cats have a favourable reputation in Islamic religious tradition.

From Wikipedia:

The domestic cat is a revered animal in Islam. Admired for its cleanliness as well as for being loved by the Islamic prophet Muhammad, the cat is considered “the quintessential pet” by Muslims. … According to many hadiths, Muhammad prohibited the persecution and killing of cats.

However, as the Saudi royal family destroys ancient Islamic historical buildings to replace them with their own palaces, they seem to hate all Islamic traditions which do not suit them.

Counting birds in Nigeria


This video says about itself:

Wonderful wildlife in Nigeria

22 July 2014

Chester Zoo has been supporting conservation work in Gashaka Gumti National Park, Nigeria, since 1994. The park is a biodiversity hot-spot, and is the home to a huge variety of wonderfully diverse wildlife, including probably the last viable population of the Cameroon-Nigeria chimpanzee sub-species.

By the Nigerian Conservation Foundation, 23 May 2016:

Giving verve to Nigeria’s Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas

As part of its commitment and dedication to the conservation and management of Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs) within and outside protected areas, the Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF, BirdLife Partner) has conducted an Annual Water Bird Census at Hadejia-Nguru Wetlands in Yobe and Jigawa States. This was also followed up with a capacity building workshop on effective monitoring of IBAs in Cross Rivers State, facilitated by NCF’s Ruth Akagu and Professor Augustine Ezealor, a renowned ornithologist.

The exercise was carried out with the support of Mr. Y.M. Kolo, Conservator of Cross River National Park (CRNP). The 2016 training was targeted at 10 unprotected IBAs, in contrast to the 2015 training, which focused strictly on Protected Areas.

The main purpose of the Water Bird Census was to ascertain the population of water birds. The census took place in six communities: Baturia, Nguru Lake, Dagona, Gsahua (new site), Katagum and Marma Chanel. Water bird species seen included storks, herons, geese, ducks and cormorants. A total of 166,439 individual birds across 212 species were recorded in the six sites visited.

The IBA workshop focused on IBAs in unprotected areas. The participants were taught basic bird identification techniques, standardised collection and recording of scientific birds and habitats data (using the IBA monitoring form and the use of the Monitoring Effectiveness Tracking Tool (METT) ), emerging conservation opportunities (carbon credits, payment for ecosystem services, ecotourism etc.) and establishment of Site Support Groups (SSGs).

The participants acquired skills in basic field techniques on bird sampling and identification, effective utilisation of the IBA form and METT framework and learned about the processes involved in establishing SSGs. They also received field equipment (field guides, binoculars and GPS) to further develop their expertise in IBA monitoring.

The training was funded by the RSPB (Birdlife in the UK) and facilitated by NCF with support from A.P. Leventis Ornithological Research Institute and National Park Service.