Trophy hunting worthless for African economy


This BBC video is called Cute baby African lion cubs relax.

From Wildlife Extra:

Trophy hunting almost worthless according to a new report

Trophy hunting, as practised by the good ol’ Trump boys, provides minimal benefit to communities.

New Report: Economics of Trophy Hunting in Africa Are Overrated and Overstated

June 2013. A new report that analyses literature on the economics of trophy hunting reveals that African countries and rural communities derive very little benefit from trophy hunting revenue. The study, authored by Economists at Large-commissioned by the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), The Humane Society of the United States, Humane Society International and Born Free USA/Born Free Foundation-comes amid consideration to grant the African lion protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA).

“The suggestion that trophy hunting plays a significant role in African economic development is misguided,” said economist Rod Campbell, lead author of the study. “Revenues constitute only a fraction of a percent of GDP and almost none of that ever reaches rural communities.”

Only 3 percent of revenue actually reaches the rural communities where hunting occurs

As a portion of any national economy, trophy hunting revenue never accounts for more than 0.27 percent of the GDP. Additionally, trophy hunting revenues account for only 1.8 percent of overall tourism in nine investigated countries that allow trophy hunting, and even pro-hunting sources find that only 3 percent of the money actually reaches the rural communities where hunting occurs. While trophy hunting supporters routinely claim that hunting generates $200 million annually in remote areas of Africa, the industry is actually economically insignificant and makes a minimal contribution to national income. Click here to read the report.

Non-consumptive nature tourism

“Local African communities are key stakeholders for conservation, and they need real incentives for conservation,” said Jeff Flocken, North American regional director, International Fund for Animal Welfare. “Non-consumptive nature tourism-like wildlife viewing and photo safaris-is a much greater contributor than trophy hunting to both conservation and the economy in Africa. If trophy hunting and other threats continue depleting Africa’s wildlife, then Africa’s wildlife tourism will disappear. That is the real economic threat to the countries of Africa.”

Lions suffering from trophy hunting

Many species suffer at the hands of trophy hunters including the African lion. The number of African lions has declined by more than 50 percent in the past three decades, with just 32,000 believed remaining today. The steepest declines in lion population numbers occur in African countries with the highest hunting intensity, illustrating the unsustainability of the practice.

“Trophy hunting is driving the African lion closer to extinction,” said Teresa Telecky, director, wildlife department, Humane Society International. “More than 560 wild lions are killed every year in Africa by international trophy hunters. An overwhelming 62 percent of trophies from these kills are imported into the United States. We must do all we can to put an end to this threat to the king of beasts.”

Listing the African lion as endangered under the ESA would generally prohibit the import of and commercial trade in lion parts, and thus would likely considerably reduce the number of lions taken by Americans each year.

“The U.S. government has a serious responsibility to act promptly and try to prevent American hunters from killing wild lions, especially when the latest evidence shows that hunting is not economically beneficial. Listing the African lion under the Endangered Species Act will help lions at almost no cost to African communities. Government inaction could doom an already imperilled species to extinction through much of its range,” said Adam Roberts, executive vice president, Born Free USA.

A copy of the economic study is available for download. For more information about African lions, please visit www.helpafricanlions.org.

21 thoughts on “Trophy hunting worthless for African economy

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  2. Amazing win! A South African court just ruled that the government violated our right to free speech when they tore down ads calling for the protection of South Africa’s lions — and we’re all over the news. Let’s use this momentum to get our petition to 1 million and save the lions:

    Dear friends,

    South African lions are being slaughtered for their bones, just to make bogus sex potions for men. But if we show President Zuma that this hurts South Africa’s image as a tourist destination, he could stop this cruelty by banning the trade in lion bones and organs. Sign the petition below — we’ll take out ads in major tourism magazines and websites:

    Sign the petition
    Hundreds of South African lions are being slaughtered to make bogus sex potions for men. But we can stop this cruel trade by hitting the government where it hurts — the tourism industry.

    A global ban on tiger bone sales has traders hunting a new prize — the majestic lions. Lions are farmed under appalling conditions in South Africa for “canned hunting”, where rich tourists pay thousands to shoot them through fences. Now experts say lion bones from these killing farms are being exported to phony ‘medicine’ makers in Asia for record profits. Trade is exploding and experts fear that as prices rise, even wild lions — with only 20,000 left in Africa — will come under poaching attack.

    If we can show President Zuma that this brutal trade is hurting South Africa’s image as a tourist destination, he could ban the trade in lion bones. Avaaz is taking out strong ads in airports, tourism websites and magazines, but we urgently need 1 million petition signers to give the ads their force. Sign below and forward this email to build our numbers fast:

    http://www.avaaz.org/en/stop_lion_slaughter_for_sex_aides_rb_en/?bHFhfab&v=30927

    ‘Tiger bone wine’ and other tiger-part medicines were banned after massive international outrage — now traders have shifted their attention to lions’ bones to make all kinds of bogus remedies. Experts say unless governments act now, lions could be the next in line — after tigers and rhinos — to face extinction.

    There is a solution: banning and punishing the trade of lion bones and organs. South Africa is currently the largest exporter of lion trophies, bones and organs — it is also the only African country actively breeding lions in large numbers to supply trophy hunting. But if we can show that allowing this senseless trade can hurt South Africa’s booming tourism industry and make visitors flee, president Zuma could be forced to act.

    Let’s build a thunderous global roar for the lions. Avaaz will show the cruelty of the lion bone trade with stinging ads — sign now and tell everyone about it:

    http://www.avaaz.org/en/stop_lion_slaughter_for_sex_aides_rb_en/?bHFhfab&v=30927

    Avaaz members across the world have come together to demand strong protection for rhinos, save the world’s bees from poisonous pesticides and achieve huge marine reserves in Chagos and Australia to safeguard vulnerable marine species. Lets come together once again and stand up for Africa’s lions.

    With hope, and determination,

    Jamie, Alex, Antonia, Mia, Alice, Ricken, Luca, Emily and the entire Avaaz team

    More information:

    Avaaz lion bones adverts were censored, finds Constitutional Court (Mail & Guardian)
    http://mg.co.za/article/2013-10-25-lion-bones-adverts-censored

    Court orders Zuma lion advert to be displayed again at OR Tambo airport (BDlive)
    http://www.bdlive.co.za/business/media/2013/10/25/court-orders-zuma-lion-advert-to-be-displayed-again-at-or-tambo-airport

    Born to be killed (Carte Blanche)
    http://beta.mnet.co.za/carteblanche/Article.aspx?ID=4226

    The Lion Bone’s Connected to the … Rhino Horn? (Rhinoconservation.org)
    http://www.rhinoconservation.org/2012/05/12/the-lion-bones-connected-to-the-rhino-horn/

    Wildlife trafficking trail leads to SA safari man (News 24)
    http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Bloody-rhino-poaching-trail-leads-to-SA-safari-operator-20110721

    Like

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