Wire-tailed manakin courtship display


This video says about itself:

13 July 2016

The Wire-tailed Manakin’s dance may be one of the most impressive in the bird world, but it can’t be performed on just any dance floor. Like many other species with elaborate displays, the male very carefully selects his dance site, also known as an exploded lek. He picks a location that is easily visible to females and then carefully maintains it, clearing away any debris that might obscure the view or get in the way of his performance.

This video accompanies Chapter 9, Avian Mating and Social Behavior, Handbook of Bird Biology 3rd Edition from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Wiley Publishing.

Wire-tailed manakins liver in South America.

Straight-billed woodcreeper feeding, video


This video says about itself:

Straight-billed Woodcreeper Breaks Down Large Insect

13 July 2016

This Straight-billed Woodcreeper has captured a substantial meal, but it is far too large for the bird to consume in one go. This problem is fixed by hitting the insect on a tree multiple times to break it into smaller, more manageable pieces that the bird can swallow.

Straight-billed Woodcreepers live in South America and Panama.

Anaconda, world’s biggest snake


This 24 May 2016 video is about anacondas; world’s biggest snake species.

I had the privilege of seeing an anaconda, resting on a river bank in Suriname. It was a young snake, not as big as the ones in this video.

Bird migration in the Americas, Internet map


This video is about bird migration.

Frpm the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA, about bird migration in the Americas:

Watch a Mesmerizing Migration Map

Watch the wonder and spectacle of bird migration captured on a single map. Using millions of bird observations from participants in eBird and the Great Backyard Bird Count, scientists at the Cornell Lab generated an animated map showing the annual journeys of 118 bird species. Watch how the routes change in spring and fall as birds ride seasonal winds to their international destinations. See the map in motion and read more.

Want to know which species is which? Check out the numbered key.

Fossil seal discovered in South America


Figure 6, from Valenzuela-Toro et al. (2015) shows the relative size of Australophoca changorum (number 12 in the figure) to other assemblages of fossil and living pinnipeds, from other places (based on latitude) and geologic times

This picture shows the relative size of newly discovered fossil seal Australophoca changorum (number 12 in the figure) to other fossil and living pinnipeds (seal relatives), from other places (based on latitude) and geologic times.

From Pyenson Lab:

11/20/2015

by Ana Valenzuela-Toro

Australophoca, a new dwarf fossil seal from South America

Today, my South American colleagues and I announce the publication of a new species of fossil seal from the western coast of South America. The name of the new genus and species, Australophoca changorum, reflects its austral origin from Chile and Peru, and honors the Changos, a coastal tribe of indigenous people who lived in the Atacama (from northern Chile to southern Peru), and were short in stature. The description, published in Papers in Palaeontology, provides a scientific name for a dwarf species of true seal from the late Miocene Bahía Inglesa and Pisco formations of Chile and Peru, respectively. One of the paratype specimens that we identified was originally recovered from Cerro Ballena in the Atacama Region of Chile; the type specimen is USNM 438707.

This tiny fossil seal was smaller than a living harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and ranks among the smallest true seals ever described, including both living and fossil ones. Interestingly, in the past ~11-3 million years, the western coast of South America seems to have been only occupied by true seals (or phocids), a fact that stands in stark difference to what we know about pinniped communities from other parts of the world, and other time[s] in the geologic record. This unusual feature of the pinniped community in western South America fits into a broader pattern of ecological turnover seen in the fossil record of marine consumers, including pinnipeds and seabirds, throughout the Southern Hemisphere, since the late Miocene.

Pantanal, Brazil wildlife conservation


This video, in Portuguese with English subtitles, says about itself:

WWF–Brazil: Cerrado Pantanal Program

24 June 2015

Home to over 4700 species and a World Natural Heritage, the Pantanal extends over an area of over 170,000 km2 in South America in an area wich includes Brazil, Bolivia and Paraguay. Meet the Cerrado Pantanal Program, a WWF-Brazil project for the sake of harmony between man and nature!