Bird migration in the Americas


This video from the USA says about itself:

5 December 2016

Habitat loss throughout the Americas is threatening entire suites of migratory birds. Flyways are fraught with growing, man-made threats: wind energy projects sited in migratory pathways, toxic pesticides, reflective windows, free-roaming cats.

Falling bird numbers tell the story. If you have been a bird lover for a while, you have noticed. Migratory birds are in trouble, and we must act. Will you donate today to help us lift up migratory birds? Your gift between now and December 31 will be matched dollar-for-dollar up to $500,000.

Club-winged manakin video


This video says about itself:

13 July 2016

Birds can use their feathers for much more than flight. In some species, for example, they produce sound. The secondary wing feathers of the male Club-Winged Manakin, a bird from South America, are large and rigid. He strikes them together at about 107 times per second to create a buzzing sound, which is used during courtship displays.

Saving birds in the Americas, video


This video from the American Bird Conservancy says about itself:

20+ Years of Results for Birds

9 August 2016

From taking on the toughest policy issues to safeguarding the rarest, ABC gets results for birds.

Wire-tailed manakin courtship display


This video says about itself:

13 July 2016

The Wire-tailed Manakin’s dance may be one of the most impressive in the bird world, but it can’t be performed on just any dance floor. Like many other species with elaborate displays, the male very carefully selects his dance site, also known as an exploded lek. He picks a location that is easily visible to females and then carefully maintains it, clearing away any debris that might obscure the view or get in the way of his performance.

This video accompanies Chapter 9, Avian Mating and Social Behavior, Handbook of Bird Biology 3rd Edition from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Wiley Publishing.

Wire-tailed manakins liver in South America.

Straight-billed woodcreeper feeding, video


This video says about itself:

Straight-billed Woodcreeper Breaks Down Large Insect

13 July 2016

This Straight-billed Woodcreeper has captured a substantial meal, but it is far too large for the bird to consume in one go. This problem is fixed by hitting the insect on a tree multiple times to break it into smaller, more manageable pieces that the bird can swallow.

Straight-billed Woodcreepers live in South America and Panama.

Anaconda, world’s biggest snake


This 24 May 2016 video is about anacondas; world’s biggest snake species.

I had the privilege of seeing an anaconda, resting on a river bank in Suriname. It was a young snake, not as big as the ones in this video.