How scuba spiders live underwater


This video says about itself:

13 January 2017

The scuba spider is the only arachnid to live exclusively underwater, despite lacking gills. Its secret, like its name suggests, is a makeshift oxygen supply.

Giant Pacific octopus video


This video from the USA says about itself:

6 January 2017

In this epic adventure taking place on two coasts, Jonathan investigates the world’s largest octopus, the Giant Pacific Octopus! He begins by meeting Sy, one of the octopuses at the New England Aquarium in Boston with cold water aquarist Bill Murphy.

Then Jonathan and Bill travel to the Seattle Aquarium to two of their octopuses Lucy and Odie with Seattle Aquarium aquarist Kathryn Kegel. Bill and Jonathan join Kathryn and her team on some dives in Puget Sound to survey wild octopus populations. Along the way, Jonathan witnesses an incredible octopus fight and gets a small glimpse into the social lives of the Giant Pacific Octopus!

Mice-eating carnivorous plants


This video from the USA says about itself:

20 January 2017

While the carnivorous cravings of most flesh-eating plants are limited to small insects, one exception is the pitcher plant. It can consume anything that fits in its mouth–including a mouse!

Wildlife video highlights of 2016


This video shows wildlife video highlights of 2016 from the Netherlands. Including a long-eared owl, a peacock butterfly, and more.

Palmetto weevil in Florida, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

18 January 2017

Florida Palmetto Weevil – is a huge “bug” and this is the first one I have ever seen in the Backyard or anywhere! …

The largest weevil in North America is the palmetto weevil, Rhynchophorus cruentatus Fabricius. The palmetto weevil is native to Florida and until recently was the only species of palm weevil in the continental United States. Once, the palmetto weevil was considered a minor pest, attacking only severely wounded and dying trees. However, it is now known to be a pest of stressed nursery and transplanted palms as well as apparently healthy Canary Island date, Bismarck (Bismarckia nobilis) and Latan (Latania spp.) palms. The adults of this species display various color variations. They can also be quite variable in overall size.

Weevils are a family of beetle that have their mandibles at the end of a, sometimes, very long rostrum (a snoutlike projection of the head). In fact, the rostrum of some weevils (i.e., nut weevils) is as long as their bodies. These modified mouthparts are used for feeding and to prepare holes in host plant material in which eggs are laid. Weevils are a large, diverse and important group of insects. Most feed on plant material, and many are considered to be economic pests. While some adults feed outside the plant, the larvae (or grubs), which have relatively large mandibles and are legless, feed cryptically within the host plant.

Worldwide, there are ten described species of weevils in the genus Rhynchophorus that feed on palms.

The ‘Florida’ palmetto weevil, Rhynchophorus cruentatus, has been reported from coastal regions of South Carolina south through the Florida Keys, and west into coastal Texas. It is also present throughout the state of Florida. Fossil records suggest that the palmetto weevil was present in Florida during the Pleistocene (about 1 million years ago).

Read more here.

Threatened moth named after Donald Trump


'Neopalpa donaldtrumpi' and Donald Trump

From the Daily Telegraph in England:

Meet ‘Neopalpa donaldtrumpi’ – the threatened moth named after Donald Trump

By Sarah Knapton, Science Editor

17 January 2017

With its striking crown of yellow and piercing stare, this newly discovered moth could only have been named after one man.

The new species has been christened ‘Neopalpa donaldtrumpi‘ in honour of America’s 45th president Donald Trump.

The moth is described for the first time by evolutionary biologist Dr Vazrick Nazari in the latest edition of the journal Zookeys, after being discovered hidden in the collections if the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California.

Both Trump and the moth share a similar habitat, stretching across the state of California, USA although it can also be found in Mexico.

Dr Nazari said the new insect, which is a type of twirler moth, bore an uncanny resemblance to Mr Trump because of the yellowish-white scales on its head. The scientists said the tuft reminded him of the incoming president’s hairstyle.

It is hoped that naming the new moth after Mr Trump will highlight the critical need for further conservation in fragile areas such as the habitat of the new species which is under serious threat from urbanisation.

“The discovery of this distinct micro-moth in the densely populated and otherwise zoologically well-studied southern California underscores the importance of conservation of the fragile habitats that still contain undescribed and threatened species, and highlights the paucity of interest in species-level taxonomy of smaller faunal elements in North America,” says discoverer Dr Nazari.

“By naming this species after the 45th President of the United States, I hope to bring some public attention to, and interest in, the importance of alpha-taxonomy in better understanding the neglected micro-fauna component of the North American biodiversity.”

Mr Trump’s flying namesake was announced only a month following after a species of basslet was named after predecessor President Barack Obama. To date, nine creatures after been named after Mr Obama.

The fish is only known from coral reefs in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, NorthwesternHawaii, a nature reserve which the 44th President of the United States of America expanded to become the largest protected marine area in the world.

Hermit crab on Ameland island beach


The maker of this video from the Netherlands, Anita Kiewied, says about it (translated):

Jan 10, 2017

“This is a recording of a hermit crab in a whelk on the beach of Ameland island near beach post 18. After a storm with very high water this hermit crab was close to the sand dunes. After recording, I brought it back to the shoreline.”