Crab fights coral-eating starfish


This video, recorded in Australia, says about itself:

This Crab Doesn’t Take Kindly to Home Intruders

23 jan. 2018

The crown-of-thorns starfish eats coral reefs; coral reefs happen to be the home of the guard crab. This puts these two tenacious aquatic creatures on a direct collision course.

From the series: David Attenborough’s Great Barrier Reef

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Manta rays helped by small fish


This video says about itself:

Manta Rays Use Tiny Fish to Help Them Stay Clean

12 January 2018

Wrasse perform a vital cleaning function for other fish, by ridding their bodies of dead cells and parasites. Their biggest customers–literally and figuratively–are the massive manta rays. From the series: David Attenborough’s Great Barrier Reef: Visitors.

Mantis shrimp mating dance


This video says about itself:

Watch This Male Mantis Shrimp Dance to Attract a Mate

9 January 2018

Mantis shrimp have a reputation as fighters and it’s well deserved. But they also have a romantic side to them, which they show off with a well-choreographed mating dance. From the series: David Attenborough’s Great Barrier Reef: Builders.

Great Barrier Reef coral reproduction


This 9 January 2018 video says about itself:

See ‘Underwater Snowstorm’ of Coral Reproducing | National Geographic

This is what it looks like when coral spawns in the Great Barrier Reef.

REEF REPAIR Australia will spend $379 million trying to save the Great Barrier Reef — the largest single investment ever made toward protecting the fading ecosystem. [HuffPost]

Scientists reveal global warming’s impact on Great Barrier Reef: here.

Young clownfish hatching at Great Barrier Reef


This video says about itself:

5 January 2018

Thanks to the use of a specialized infrared camera, we’re now able to witness a never-before-seen phase of clownfish development: the nighttime hatching of larva from their eggs.

From the series: David Attenborough‘s Great Barrier Reef: Builders.

Great Barrier Reef fish protection works


This 2015 video is called Australia’s Great Barrier Reef || Full Documentary with subtitles.

From PLOS ONE:

Great Barrier Reef protected zones help fish in even lightly exploited areas

Fish biomass up to five times greater compared to unprotected zones at northernmost reefs

November 8, 2017

Protected zones of the Great Barrier Reef benefit fish even at the relatively lightly-fished northern reefs, according to a study published November 8, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Carolina Castro-Sanguino from the University of Queensland, Australia, and colleagues.

The Australian Great Barrier Reef Marine Park is the largest network of marine reserves in the world, and includes both ‘no fishing’ (‘no-take’) and ‘no-entry’ zones as well as fished areas. The authors of the present study analyzed the effect of such policies in the relatively lightly-fished northernmost regions. They measured, counted and calculated the biomass of commonly-fished species found at 31 northern, central and southern reefs in the area north of Cooktown, as well as assessing the seabed habitat at these sites.

The authors found that fish biomass was up to five times greater in protected zones which prevented fishing, whether they had ‘no-take’ or ‘no-entry’ policies. The most remote northern reefs had greater fish biomass than more southern zones, regardless of the zones’ policies, and the authors speculate that poaching may be common in southern reserves. They also found indication that fishers may frequently operate at reserves’ boundaries to exploit the increased fish biomass in these reserves.

The specific seabed habitat of different reefs had a strong effect on the amounts and types of fish found, making it impossible for the researchers to discern any distinct effects of ‘no-take’ versus ‘no-entry’ policies. Nonetheless, they did find clear differences in biomass between protected and unprotected areas, despite this region being generally fished relatively lightly. They state that this illustrates the high sensitivity to fishing of many species, reinforcing the case for their protection.

“Even in remote reef habitats, marine reserves increase the biomass of exploited fish but detecting these benefits can be challenging because the state of corals also varies across some management zones and these patterns also affect fishes,” says Castro-Sanguino. “We also conclude that fishing is most intense near reserve borders leading to a reduction of biomass just outside reserves.”

Australian Great Barrier Reef coral problems


This March 2017 WWF video is about the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. It has coral bleaching problems.