British Prince William killed wildlife a day before his pro-wildlife appeal


This video from Britain says about itself:

Prince Harry Kills Me reinserted into Jeremy Dellers English Magic at Venice Biennale 2013

5 June 2013

The British government’s censoring of Jeremy Deller‘s hypergraphic Harry Kills Me at the 2013 Venice Biennale – which referred to Prince Harry’s role as officer in the British Army in Afghanistan as well as his shooting of endangered hen harriers on one of his family estates … can show us, besides the snivelling servitude of Deller and the bureaucrats of the British Council, some ways that art functions today.

The actions of the council first show how not just politics but how art too is a continuation of war by other means. The passive reaction and collusion of the press in the UK shows how censorship is art made not tongue-tied but triumphant. Meaning is constructed by what is occulted not revealed.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

Prince William went hunting a day before launching wildlife appeal

BBC royal correspondent Nicholas Witchell questions timing of trip to hunt deer and wild boar in Spain

Alexandra Topping

Sunday 9 February 2014 12.51 GMT

Prince William went on a deer and wild boar hunting trip in Spain a day before he launched a high-profile appeal to stop the illegal hunting of wildlife, it has emerged.

There is no suggestion the hunting trip was in any way illegal, but critics have suggested that the timing of the holiday was poor, coming before an appeal close to the prince’s heart.

In a message broadcast on Sunday, the Duke of Cambridge and his father, Prince Charles, called on people to help save endangered animals such as rhinos, elephants and tigers.

A royal spokesman said the duke, who quit the RAF last year to lead a new global conservation group, United for Wildlife, was a “passionate advocate” on the subject.

The BBC royal correspondent Nicholas Witchell questioned the timing of the trip, which was also attended by Prince Harry, the Sun reported. “Such a trip is a world away from shooting endangered species for profit, but some may feel that to go hunting himself just as he launches a high-profile campaign is, at the very least, ill-timed,” Witchell said.

A royal spokesman said: “The Duke of Cambridge has for many years been a passionate advocate for endangered wildlife and has campaigned tirelessly to help stop the illegal poaching of rhino horn and elephant tusk. His track record in this area speaks for itself.”

In the broadcast, William and Charles make appeals in languages including Mandarin, Arabic and Swahili to stop the illegal wildlife trade.

Prince Charles, president of the wildlife charity WWF UK, starts the message with a warning that the trade has reached “unprecedented levels of killing and related violence” and poses a threat not only to endangered animals but to economic and political stability around the globe.

He says: “More than 30,000 elephants were killed last year, amounting to nearly 100 deaths per day. In the past 10 years, 62% of African forest elephants have been lost. If this rate continues, the forest elephant will be extinct within 10 years. A rhinoceros is killed every 11 hours. As recently as 100 years ago, there were as many as 100,000 wild tigers living in Asia. Today, there are believed to be fewer than 3,200 left in the wild.”

The duke, who is royal patron of the wildlife conservation charity Tusk Trust, says he wants future generations, including his son, George, to be able to appreciate protected wildlife. “This year, I have become even more devoted to protecting the resources of the Earth for not only my own son but also the other children of his generation to enjoy,” he says.

On Wednesday the duke will attend a United for Wildlife symposium at the Zoological Society of London, followed by an evening reception at the Natural History Museum to mark the start of a high-profile wildlife conference hosted by the British government.

The conference, held at Lancaster House in London, will host policymakers and campaigners from 50 countries, and there will be speeches from Charles and foreign secretary, William Hague.

The conference aims to tackle the wildlife trade by strengthening law enforcement, reducing demand for illegal products and supporting sustainable livelihoods for communities in affected areas, according to the government.

This reminds me of some things.

That His Royal Highness, the Duke of Cambridge, hunted in Spain of all places. reminded me of King Juan Carlos of Spain. Who went to Africa to kill elephants.

This also reminded of the Duke of Cambridge’s brother, Prince Harry. Police accused His Royal Highness of killing two endangered hen harriers. However, British authorities let His Royal Highness off the hook.

It also reminded me of this. The late Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands killed many elephants. Then, he became a big shot in the WWF. He then proposed to kill elephant poachers without trial. However much I am against poaching, I am also against the death penalty; certainly without trial.

WWF Spain recently sacked the king of Spain for elephant killing. So, there is some improvement in some places.

With the gathering of the first United for Wildlife conference in London this week, the subject of international wildlife crime has been very much in the media spotlight. This has stimulated a huge amount of online commentary and debate about our tendency to view wildlife crime as a foreign issue, and whether or not we adhere to our responsibility to practice what we preach: here.

The Angolan government has announced on Thursday in London, UK, its whole concern about the gradual strengthening of the network of people and money associated with wildlife trade and other forms of organised criminal activity: here.

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Bahraini torture princess acquitted by her royal dynasty’s court


This video says about itself:

Royal Torture: Bahrain princess charged with activist abuse

28 Jan 2013

Bahraini authorities are set for a new round of talks with the opposition later this week amid the continuing crackdown on anti-regime rallies across the nation. The Sunni monarchy has been widely accused by rights groups of using tear gas and torture against protesters. And as RT’s Aleksey Yaroshevsky reports even those who try and treat the injured demonstrators say they are being victimized.

From Associated Press:

Bahrain acquits police officers accused of torture

Updated: Monday, December 23, 1:08 PM

MANAMA, Bahrain — A lawyer says a Bahrain court has acquitted two police officers accused of torturing doctors who were detained while treating wounded Shiite protesters in 2011.

Lawyer Ali Al Juffairi says he attended Monday’s court session and that none of the six doctors or the two police officers were present when the verdict was read. The doctors were released from custody at different times over the past years.

Among the two acquitted was Noora bint Ibrahim Al Khalifa, a female police officer and member of Bahrain’s royal family.

The doctors were detained at the height of protests in Bahrain by Shiites demanding greater rights from the Sunni monarchy.

The case is the latest in a string of acquittals for security officers accused of using excessing force and abusing detainees in Bahrain.

Children 10 years old & 13 years old are detained since 19 December in #Bahrain. Prosecution may extend detention tomorrow: here.

Sunni monarchs back YouTube hate preachers: Anti-Shia propaganda threatens a sectarian civil war which will engulf the entire Muslim world: here.