Bahraini royals killing Pakistani protected birds


This video is called MacQueen’s Bustard on a mating dance.

Note: the article below here mentions “houbara bustards“. Meanwhile, biologists consider the MacQueen’s bustards of Pakistan and elsewhere in Asia, as a species, separate from the African houbara bustard.

Bahraini royals kill not only female journalists. They, like Qatari princes, kill protected birds in Pakistan as well.

From Dawn daily in Pakistan:

Bahraini king, family members get permits to hunt protected houbara bustard

Bhagwandas — Updated Dec 28, 2016 12:15pm

KARACHI: The federal government has issued at least seven special permits to dignitaries of Bahrain, including King Sheikh Hamad bin Isa bin Salman Al-Khalifa, to hunt the internationally protected bird houbara bustard in the country during the 2016-17 hunting season, according to sources.

Among those who have been given the permits to hunt the migratory bird in Sindh and Balochistan are an uncle of the king, his defence adviser, a field marshal and armed forces chief, and other members of the Bahraini royal family, according to the sources.

The sources said that not only was Pakistan a signatory to various international nature conservation conventions that restricted the bird’s hunting but the country’s wildlife protection laws also prohibited its killing. The Pakistanis were, therefore, not allowed to hunt the protected species.

The hunting permits signed by the foreign ministry’s deputy chief of protocol, Naeem Iqbal Cheema, have been sent to the members of the Bahraini royal family through Bahrain’s embassy in the federal capital.

The letter Mr Cheema sent to the Gulf kingdom’s diplomatic mission in Islamabad says: “The ministry of foreign affairs of Pakistan presents its compliments to the Embassy of Kingdom of Bahrain in Islamabad and has the honour to state that the government of Pakistan has conveyed its recommendations to the authorities in the provinces concerned for allocation of following areas to the dignitaries of Kingdom of Bahrain for hunting of houbara bustard for the season 2016-17.”

According to the letter, King Sheikh Hamad bin Isa bin Salman Al-Khalifa has been allocated Jamshoro district (Thano Bula Khan, Kotri, Manjhand and Sehwan tehsils) in Sindh.

The king’s uncle, Sheikh Ebrahim bin Hamad bin Abdullah Al-Khalifa, has been allocated Shah Bandar tehsil and Janabad and Sonda union councils in Thatta district. The king’s defence adviser, Sheikh Abdullah bin Salman Al-Khalifa, will hunt birds in Jati tehsil of Thatta district.

Field Marshal and Commander-in-Chief of the Bahrain Defence Forces Sheikh Khalifa bin Ahmed Al-Khalifa will hunt the bird in Toisar tehsil of Musakhel district in Balochistan. The king’s first cousin and interior minister, Lt Gen Sheikh Rashid bin Abdullah Al-Khalifa, will hunt the migratory bird in Jaffarabad district of Balochistan.

Bahraini prince accused of murdering journalist


This video says about itself:

Female journalist Eman Salehi shot dead in front of son by a member of Bahrain’s royal family

29 December 2016

Eman Salehi worked as a sports journalist for Bahrain‘s state-run TV broadcaster. She, a young mother, has been gunned down in the street as her six-year-old son watched from inside their car in Bahrain.

Eman Salehi was a 28-year-old Shiite woman.

She was known for her piercing blue eyes and friendly demeanor.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Bahrain: Royal family implicated in death of journalist

Saturday 31st December 2016

BAHRAIN’S royal family has been implicated in the killing of a journalist in front of her young son.

Reports suggest that Eman Salehi was murdered by a Bahraini royal serving in the military. Ms Salehi was a sports journalist for Bahrain’s state television.

She was shot dead in the street on December 23 as her six-year-old son watched from her car.

Ms Salehi’s vehicle was stopped in Riffa, an area popular with the royal family and military chiefs. A 34-year-old man is said to have shot her once in the head and then turned himself in.

“If you say it involves the military, it involves the king,” said Said Yousif Almuhafdah of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights. “No-one wants to mention that.”

The Gulf monarchy is heavily backed by Britain with arms and political support. It is currently carrying out a widespread crackdown on civil rights activists. In one case, campaigner Nabeel Rajab faces 15 years in jail for a few tweets.

More than three months ago, on 29 September 2016, a large number of men in masks raided Fadhel Abbas’s home at Hamad Town in Bahrain at 3am and took him away in Ministry of the Interior (MOI) vehicles. Family members who were there say no arrest warrant was shown and that Abbas called around seven hours later saying he was being held at the feared Criminal Investigations Directorate (CID): here.

War in Yemen and Saudi royals


This video says about itself:

War in Yemen Tests Influence of Saudi Royal Family

14 December 2016

Zenab Ahmed of Souciant.com says while Obama’s decision to limit shipment of armaments may affect the standing of the royal family, the prolonged nature of the war and dissatisfaction of its junior partners that’s weakening the family’s influence in the state.

Saudi death penalty, even for a prince


This video says about itself:

Saudi beheading – Myanmar woman screams innocence before execution

1-17-2015 – A Myanmar woman beheaded in a Saudi street this week for killing her husband’s young daughter is seen screaming her innocence in a video posted on the Internet Saturday.

Saudi authorities have arrested someone for filming the incident, said local newspaper websites, including Okaz and Al-Riyadh, in reports accompanied by still shots from the recording.

“I did not kill. There is no God but God. I did not kill,” cries the woman, covered in black, apparently kneeling on the pavement circled by police officers in the video on LiveLeak.

“Haram. Haram. Haram. Haram. I did not kill … I do not forgive you … This is an injustice,” she screams in Arabic, using the Islamic term for something that is forbidden.

The executioner, dressed in a white robe, forces her to lie down on the ground, near a pedestrian crossing. Mountains are seen in the distance.

“I did not,” she continues before a final scream as the executioner’s curved sword severs her head, in a traditional execution for the kingdom, which carries out death sentences in public.

Several other videos purportedly showing beheadings in Saudi Arabia have circulated online over the past three years.

Saudi Arabia executed 87 people last year, up from 78 in 2013, according to an AFP tally.

A United Nations special rapporteur has said trials leading to the death penalty in Saudi Arabia are “grossly unfair”.

Rape, murder, apostasy, armed robbery and drug trafficking are punishable by death in the oil-rich Gulf state that is a close ally of Washington.

Saudi authorities identified Bassim as holding “Burmese nationality”, using the former name for Myanmar, but did not specify if she was from its Rohingya Muslim community.

In Saudi Arabia, some princesses of the royal family can get away with crimes for which non-royal women might get harsh punishment, including the death penalty. However, some other princesses may get tortured for not confirming to establishment anti-women rules.

In Saudi Arabia, some princes of the royal family can get away with things like drinking alcohol, wholesale smuggling of illegal drugs, rape etc. for which non-royal men might get harsh punishment, including the death penalty. Like with royal family women, there are a few exceptions to that rule.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Saudi Arabia executes prince

Today, 05:46

In Saudi Arabia a prince has been executed. This was done according to the Saudi Interior Ministry because he had killed a man in a quarrel three years ago.

It’s about Prince Turki bin Saud al-Kabir, one of the thousands of members of the Saudi royal family. He is not known to have had an important job.

The death penalty in Saudi Arabia happens with great regularity, but there are hardly any cases of members of the royal family who have been executed. One of the most famous was Prince Faisal bin Musaid al Saud, who was executed in 1975 because he had murdered his uncle, King Faisal.

From the International Business Times today:

A Saudi state news service report said Prince Turki bin Saud al-Kabir was put to death in the capital Riyadh but the report did not mention the method of execution used. Generally, most death penalties in the Islamic kingdom are carried out by beheading in a public square.

In one respect, Saudi Arabia today differs from sixteenth or seventeenth century England. There, beheading was a ‘privilege’, only for nobility people condemned to death. Commoners were hanged.