Bahraini prince accused of murdering journalist


This video says about itself:

Female journalist Eman Salehi shot dead in front of son by a member of Bahrain’s royal family

29 December 2016

Eman Salehi worked as a sports journalist for Bahrain‘s state-run TV broadcaster. She, a young mother, has been gunned down in the street as her six-year-old son watched from inside their car in Bahrain.

Eman Salehi was a 28-year-old Shiite woman.

She was known for her piercing blue eyes and friendly demeanor.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Bahrain: Royal family implicated in death of journalist

Saturday 31st December 2016

BAHRAIN’S royal family has been implicated in the killing of a journalist in front of her young son.

Reports suggest that Eman Salehi was murdered by a Bahraini royal serving in the military. Ms Salehi was a sports journalist for Bahrain’s state television.

She was shot dead in the street on December 23 as her six-year-old son watched from her car.

Ms Salehi’s vehicle was stopped in Riffa, an area popular with the royal family and military chiefs. A 34-year-old man is said to have shot her once in the head and then turned himself in.

“If you say it involves the military, it involves the king,” said Said Yousif Almuhafdah of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights. “No-one wants to mention that.”

The Gulf monarchy is heavily backed by Britain with arms and political support. It is currently carrying out a widespread crackdown on civil rights activists. In one case, campaigner Nabeel Rajab faces 15 years in jail for a few tweets.

More than three months ago, on 29 September 2016, a large number of men in masks raided Fadhel Abbas’s home at Hamad Town in Bahrain at 3am and took him away in Ministry of the Interior (MOI) vehicles. Family members who were there say no arrest warrant was shown and that Abbas called around seven hours later saying he was being held at the feared Criminal Investigations Directorate (CID): here.

War in Yemen and Saudi royals


This video says about itself:

War in Yemen Tests Influence of Saudi Royal Family

14 December 2016

Zenab Ahmed of Souciant.com says while Obama’s decision to limit shipment of armaments may affect the standing of the royal family, the prolonged nature of the war and dissatisfaction of its junior partners that’s weakening the family’s influence in the state.

Saudi death penalty, even for a prince


This video says about itself:

Saudi beheading – Myanmar woman screams innocence before execution

1-17-2015 – A Myanmar woman beheaded in a Saudi street this week for killing her husband’s young daughter is seen screaming her innocence in a video posted on the Internet Saturday.

Saudi authorities have arrested someone for filming the incident, said local newspaper websites, including Okaz and Al-Riyadh, in reports accompanied by still shots from the recording.

“I did not kill. There is no God but God. I did not kill,” cries the woman, covered in black, apparently kneeling on the pavement circled by police officers in the video on LiveLeak.

“Haram. Haram. Haram. Haram. I did not kill … I do not forgive you … This is an injustice,” she screams in Arabic, using the Islamic term for something that is forbidden.

The executioner, dressed in a white robe, forces her to lie down on the ground, near a pedestrian crossing. Mountains are seen in the distance.

“I did not,” she continues before a final scream as the executioner’s curved sword severs her head, in a traditional execution for the kingdom, which carries out death sentences in public.

Several other videos purportedly showing beheadings in Saudi Arabia have circulated online over the past three years.

Saudi Arabia executed 87 people last year, up from 78 in 2013, according to an AFP tally.

A United Nations special rapporteur has said trials leading to the death penalty in Saudi Arabia are “grossly unfair”.

Rape, murder, apostasy, armed robbery and drug trafficking are punishable by death in the oil-rich Gulf state that is a close ally of Washington.

Saudi authorities identified Bassim as holding “Burmese nationality”, using the former name for Myanmar, but did not specify if she was from its Rohingya Muslim community.

In Saudi Arabia, some princesses of the royal family can get away with crimes for which non-royal women might get harsh punishment, including the death penalty. However, some other princesses may get tortured for not confirming to establishment anti-women rules.

In Saudi Arabia, some princes of the royal family can get away with things like drinking alcohol, wholesale smuggling of illegal drugs, rape etc. for which non-royal men might get harsh punishment, including the death penalty. Like with royal family women, there are a few exceptions to that rule.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Saudi Arabia executes prince

Today, 05:46

In Saudi Arabia a prince has been executed. This was done according to the Saudi Interior Ministry because he had killed a man in a quarrel three years ago.

It’s about Prince Turki bin Saud al-Kabir, one of the thousands of members of the Saudi royal family. He is not known to have had an important job.

The death penalty in Saudi Arabia happens with great regularity, but there are hardly any cases of members of the royal family who have been executed. One of the most famous was Prince Faisal bin Musaid al Saud, who was executed in 1975 because he had murdered his uncle, King Faisal.

From the International Business Times today:

A Saudi state news service report said Prince Turki bin Saud al-Kabir was put to death in the capital Riyadh but the report did not mention the method of execution used. Generally, most death penalties in the Islamic kingdom are carried out by beheading in a public square.

In one respect, Saudi Arabia today differs from sixteenth or seventeenth century England. There, beheading was a ‘privilege’, only for nobility people condemned to death. Commoners were hanged.

Thailand dictatorship humiliates woman for free speech


This video from Thailand says about itself:

17 October 2016

Thai woman made to kneel before king’s portrait over royal insult

In this image made from video taken on Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016, Umaporn Sarasat, 43, kneels before King Bhumibol Adulyadej‘s portrait after she is accused of insulting the royal institution. Pic: AP.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Thai woman made to kneel down as punishment for insulting Bhumibol

Today, 14:14

After the death of King Bhumibol last Thursday Thailand is in deep mourning. … but that is not true for everyone. As for Umaporn Sarasat who posted critical comments on social media about the royals.

She was arrested immediately and afterwards a mob of angry [monarchists] went to the police station on the island Koh Samui. The woman had to prostrate herself in public before a photo of the king, while the crowd screamed abuse at her. She will be prosecuted for lèse majesté.

A conviction for lèse majesté may mean fifteen years in jail in Thailand.

An award-winning Thai film director has told the BBC he does not want his latest film shown in Thailand as he would be required to self-censor: here.

A cleaning lady in Thailand is being charged by the government for posting the words “I see” on Facebook. She is accused of insulting the monarchy – a charge that can lead to jail sentences of up to 15 years. However, she says she is being punished because her son is an activist, as the BBC’s Jonathan Head reports: here.

After the announcement of the King’s death Thursday evening, all television channels including foreign networks such as the BBC were replaced with government-produced footage eulogizing the king. BBC correspondent Jonathan Head confirmed their coverage about Thailand had been blocked in the country several times ever since. “Whenever reporting on Thailand comes up our transmissions are blocked. Just now when I was reporting live,” Head told Khaosod English Sunday: here.

The autocratic record of Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej: here.

King of Thailand dies


This video from the USA says about itself:

Don’t Mess with Thailand King’s Dog

16 December 2015

James Corden looks at a few stories about animals, including a man facing a harsh sentence for insulting the first dog of Thailand and a painting seal.

On the same day that Italian Nobel Prize winning playwright Dario Fo has died, another man has died: King Bhumibol of Thailand.

These two men were both well-known persons. They died at nearly the same age: Dario Fo was 90; King Bhumibol was 88.

However, for the rest there were big differences. Dario Fo mocked oppressive authority. King Bhumibol allowed himself to be used as a symbol for oppressive authority, often wielded by cruel military dictators.

The dictatorship in Thailand meted out draconian penalties for supposed lèse majesté against the king; though the criticisms for which people were punished harshly were often not against the king, but, eg, against the king’s dog or against the military dictators.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

Thai King Bhumibol is dead. This was announced by the Thai court. King Bhumibol (88), also known as Rama IX, struggled for years with poor health. …

His son, Crown Prince Vajiralongkorn (63), is the intended successor. Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha said Bhumibol appointed him in 2002. …

Prayuth further said that the government will observe a mourning period of one year and for thirty days flags will hang at half-mast. …

The Thai king was the longest reigning monarch in the world. He ascended the Thai throne in 1946 after his brother had died from a gunshot wound. Who fired the bullet was never cleared up completely. Two members of the royal household got the death penalty for it. Bhumibol was crowned king in 1950.

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth (90) is now the longest reigning monarch. She has today been on the throne for 64 years and 250 days.

The death of the Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej yesterday afternoon at the age of 88 has provoked fears in ruling circles in Thailand and internationally that the country’s protracted political crisis will worsen. The king had close ties to the armed forces and was the linchpin of the state apparatus, currently presided over by a military junta: here.

Monarchist mob threatens Thai who, long before the king’s death, had written that ‘everyone will die at some time’.

KENNY COYLE writes on the strangeness and waning support of Thailand’s King Rama X, a monarch with very few friends: here.