Worst ever British monarch, poll

This video says about itself:

The Most Evil Men and Women in History – Episode Fourteen – Bloody Mary Tudor

16 September 2014

Mary I was the fourth crowned monarch of the Tudor dynasty, she is remembered for restoring England to Roman Catholicism after succeeding her half-brother, Edward VI, to the English throne. In the process, she had almost 300 religious dissenters burned at the stake in the Marian Persecutions, earning her the sobriquet of “Bloody Mary”.

From daily The Independent in Britain today:

Who is our worst monarch of all time? The people have spoken

A poll of 1,579 British adults by YouGov has shown that the public considers Henry VIII to be our worst ever monarch.

Which would you consider to be our worst-ever monarch?

Survey of 1,579 British adults between 3-4 September 2015. Figures as a per cent, not including answers of “Don’t know”.

19 Henry VIII
7 Other
6 King Canute
3 William the Conqueror
1 Alfred the Great
1 Elizabeth I
1 Victoria

Henry VIII is perhaps best known for his six wives and his separation of the Church of England from the Roman Catholic Church, leading to the dissolution of the monasteries.

King Canute ranks second in our public opinion, with 6 per cent of the vote, whereas James I ranked third worst, with 5 per cent.

Among Labour supporters, Elizabeth II ranks as fourth worst on the given list of monarchs with four per cent naming her as the worst to sit upon the throne, whereas 0 per cent of Conservative supporters nominated her as the worst.

On Wednesday at around 5.30pm, Queen Elizabeth II becomes the longest-ever reigning monarch of the United Kingdom.

She will have reigned for 63 years and seven months, surpassing Queen Victoria’s record.

I am a bit surprised that Bloody Mary, Charles I, Charles II, James II, George III and George IV are not options in the multiple choice question.

King of Bahrain sends his torturing sons to Yemen war

This video from England says about itself:

Solicitor Sue Willman on case against Bahrain prince accused of torture

Sue Willman from Deighton Pierce Glynn Solicitors speaking at “Forced Disappearance and Torture in the UAE” on 5 November 2014 in London.

I rarely quote from Al Arabiya TV, which is full of propaganda for the absolute monarchy of Saudi Arabia.

However, today is an exception. So, from Al Arabiya:

Bahrain’s King: My sons will be sent to help coalition forces in Yemen

Monday, 7 September 2015

Bahrain’s King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa announced late on Sunday that his sons, Sheikh Nasser bin Hamad and Sheikh Khalid bin Hamad, will soon be joining Saudi-led coalition operations in Yemen, according to a report carried by pan-Arab newspaper Asharq Al-Awsat.

Sheikh Nasser bin Hamad is widely known as ‘the torture prince‘ for his cruelty against Bahraini sports people and other civilian prisoners, as part of the regime’s efforts to drown pro-democracy aspirations of the Bahraini people in blood.

Among several other torturing Bahraini royals is the other torture prince now reportedly going to the Yemen war, Sheikh Khalid bin Hamad.

“My sons will be joining their brothers in the Arab coalition forces in Yemen as part of their national military duties,” Bahrain’s King reportedly said.

The announcement of Bahraini royalty joining forces in Yemen came after five Bahraini, ten Saudi and 45 UAE troops were killed by Houthi militias during operations in Yemen last week.

If the two Bahraini princes really will go off to the bloody war in Yemen, if the report is not just propaganda, then that will mean, for the moment, two torturers less in Bahrain.

However, chances of Yemeni prisoners of war and civilian prisoners being tortured will go up.

Very probably, the Bahraini princes will not go to the dangerous areas of the military front lines. Their chances of dying will be considerably less than those of the United Arab Emirates conscripts, sent to Yemen by the UAE regime as cannon fodder against their and their families wishes.

Bahraini security forces have arrested 10 children under 18 over the past two weeks and they are now in custody instead of their classrooms, the Bahrain Center for Human Rights (BCHR) was quoted by the Arabic-language Al-Ahed news website as saying on Monday. The new school year in Bahrain started on Sunday as more than 240 schoolchildren are deprived of education because of their detention by the ruling Al Khalifa regime, the human rights body said: here.

As longtime legislators who believe in the promotion of human rights and dignity, we are deeply disappointed by the U.S. State Department’s recent decision to resume arms sales to Bahrain. U.S. arms sales should never aid and abet the repression of peaceful protesters, and we are introducing legislation to roll back this misguided decision: here.

U.S.-made cluster munitions causing civilian deaths in Yemen: here.

21 September 2015. On Sunday, a Saudi-led coalition air strike ripped through a market in Sanaa, Yemen, killing 69 civilians and injuring dozens of others. People had been out shopping for Eid al-Adha, the annual Muslim Feast of Sacrifice, when the bombs fell. Photos posted on social media show corpses strewn amidst the rubble in the aftermath of the assault: here.

Thirty years jail for insulting king of Thailand

This June 2014 video is called Thailand dictator watch.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

30 years in jail for insulting Thai king

Today, 12:36

In Thailand, a man has been convicted to thirty years in prison for lèse majesté. He insulted on Facebook among others King Bhumibol.

There are stiff penalties in Thailand for insulting the king, queen, heirs or regents. For each offense a person can receive a maximum sentence of fifteen years.


The court in Bangkok ruled that the 48-year-old Pongsak Sriboonpeng in six cases was guilty of insulting the monarchy. For each charge, he was sentenced to ten years, but because he pleaded guilty, his sentence was halved.

“This breaks a record,” said his lawyer. Because in Thailand there is a state of siege Sriboonpeng can not appeal against the verdict of the military court.


Since the military coup in May 2014 in the country, the number of convictions for lèse majesté has increased considerably. Before the coup took place there were two court cases, now there are at least 56, according to a local human rights organization.

In April, was a businessman was convicteed to 25 years in prison for insulting the monarchy. This week a man with mental problems was sentenced to five years in prison, because he had damaged a portrait of the king and the queen.

Critics think the draconic punishments are for silencing opponents of the monarchy and the military regime.

Swaziland absolute monarchy


By Geraldine Donnelly from Scotland:

Swaziland: Home of the forgotten despot

Monday 05 December 2011

If you were asked what you knew about Swaziland, what would be your response? What do you know about this small country of less than a million people located between Mozambique and South Africa?

As the Scottish Trades Union Congress delegate on a recent ACTSA visit to southern Africa, I had little knowledge of Swaziland.

What I saw in this beautiful country shocked and saddened me. Seventeen years after the overthrow of apartheid, another people in southern Africa are suffering under a brutal tyranny, relatively unnoticed by the world.

Swaziland is an absolute monarchy that has been ruled by King Mswati since 1986.

The Forbes Rich List named him in the top 15 of the world’s richest royals, with a personal fortune that is in excess of $100 million, enabling him to provide palaces and new BMWs for his 14 wives.

Three-quarters of the country’s land is effectively owned by the king and administered by the local chiefs. With the government handpicked, the parliament has increased the king’s budget by 60 per cent in the last two years.

According to the US government about “40 per cent of the government’s workforce is allocated to security.”

In stark contrast two-thirds of the people survive on less than $1.25 a day.

Swaziland has the world’s highest HIV rate and half the population dies before 40.

Perhaps the saddest statistic is that one in 12 of all Swazi are orphaned children.

This is compounded by the growing economic crisis. The government is threatening to cut 7,000 jobs, pushing thousands deeper into poverty, while spending increases on the king and his friends.

The bedfellow of this poverty is political tyranny. Swaziland has the unenviable achievement of having a worse record on political rights than Zimbabwe.

Political parties are banned and it has endured a state of emergency since 1973.

Opponents of the regime are often arrested, tortured or even murdered as the main opposition is declared “terrorist” under the repressive Suppression of Terrorism Act.

Swazi NUS president Maxwell Dlamini and Musa Ngebuni of the Swaziland Youth Congress (SWAYOCO) are still behind bars awaiting trial following their arrest before protests held in April.

Women are subjected to horrendous levels of gender-based violence.

A 2009 survey revealed that almost a third of women and girls aged 13 to 24 had experienced sexual violence before their 18th birthday.

The law provides no protection for women from domestic violence or rape by their husbands.

The laws governing marriage ensure that women are treated as second-class citizens. Married women are denied the right to own property and widows are unable to inherit property if they are forced from their homes by their husband’s relatives.

However, the people of Swaziland have continued to struggle for democracy.

The trade unions, despite their leaders being regularly arrested and harassed, have held regular strikes and protests.

Women and students have formed groups to campaign for democracy and rights and an underground pro-democracy party Pudemo was formed in 1983.

Despite constant harassment, including the arrest of one leader, Sipho Jele, who died in custody in May 2010 imprisoned for wearing a protest T-shirt, they have grown in strength.

In 2008 King Mswati held lavish celebrations costing millions of dollars to mark his 40th birthday and 40 years of independence, but the people of Swaziland responded by organising the country’s biggest pro-democracy protests with 10,000 crowding the streets of the Manzini and reassembling in the capital Mbabane the next day.

The pro-democracy movement in Swaziland has called for smart sanctions, including the denial of international travel for the royal family and their lackeys, a ban on investment in companies controlled by the regime and an embargo on military sales to Swaziland.

Until now the devastating situation in Swaziland has largely gone unnoticed by the international community, but gradually more and more voices across the world are beginning to speak out.

Swaziland needs our solidarity now. The voices of the Swazi people’s struggle must be heard as Swaziland is still the land of the forgotten despot.

While there we listened, humbled, as student leaders told us of the daily danger of death or imprisonment, but they left us in no doubt that they will continue to fight until Swaziland is free.

The international labour movement must support them in their continuing struggle for political and economic freedom.

In solidarity we must advance to strengthen the trade union and pro-democracy movements building upon partnerships and projects that have raised the profile and capacity-building of trade unions and civil society in Swaziland to bring about change.

Action for Southern Africa, the successor organisation to the British Anti-Apartheid Movement, is one of the few organisations campaigning for democracy and rights in solidarity with the people of Swaziland. If you want to get involved in supporting the fight for democracy in Swaziland contact ACTSA www.actsa.org.

Dutch royal family anti-Semitism?

This video says about itself:

Amsterdam “The City That Remembers”

22 May 2013

This DVD is digitally converted from the original broadcast tape master of a 30 minute documentary which I produced in Holland in 1997. This is a very personal project with one simple objective: to pass along to future generations awareness of the horrors of Nazi Germany’s systematic genocide in WWII … knowledge so easily lost and forgotten unless we keep it alive. After you have viewed this DVD, I hope you will place it in a school, library, church, synagogue, or other permanent place where it will be shown and viewed again and again for decades to come.

The idea for producing this documentary grew from my many trips to Amsterdam and the urging from a close friend there, Harry Moinat, that I interview Jewish survivors of the Dutch Holocaust before they all died. The more I learned the more I had to tell inspiring Amsterdam’s story of resistance and determination.

Harry introduced me to a contemporary of Anne Frank, Jaap van Velzen, who was just 12 years old when he escaped from his Nazi captors by brazenly slipping away from a kindergarten where he and other children were being held awaiting shipment to the death camps. After his escape he hid in the south of the Netherlands till war’s end. He was the only member of his family to survive. Jaap later became a successful businessman and noted scholar regarding the Dutch Holocaust.

His childhood recollections are woven into this portrait of the systematic roundup of Jews, gypsies, homosexuals and the mentally impaired and their shipment out of Amsterdam using the city’s own streetcars to deliver them at night to waiting Nazi freight cars at Amsterdam’s central train station. From there they were shipped to Westerbork concentration camp before being sent on to their deaths at Auschwitz and other German death camps.

I wrote, shot, edited and narrated this documentary to share with you an understanding of why Amsterdam is truly “The City That Remembers.”

Larry M. Ray

Translated from the Nieuw Israelitisch Weekblad (NIW) in the Netherlands:

June 26, 2015

Press Release: Jewish students removed in 1951 from the princesses’ school classes

With knowledge of Queen Juliana in 1951, Jewish students were preventively removed from classes at the Nieuwe Baarnsche School where the princesses Margriet and Irene were placed. This emerges from an article by historian Bart Wallet in the Nieuw Israelitisch Weekblad published today.

The initiative to remove Jewish students came from “a certain circle of [elite] Baarn town residents’, with the knowledge of Queen Juliana. The parents of the removed Jewish students approached the royal court. After that, Juliana in response stated that “the royal dynasty of Orange are not anti-Semitic.” Ultimately, the issue disappeared under the carpet.

The article was written by prominent historian Bart Wallet. He is research leader in religious history at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. He got exclusive access to archives, including the Royal Archives, the archives of the Dutch Jewish Congregation and various private archives.

NIW editor Maurice Swirc declares: “This is a potentially explosive history, especially since it took place six years after the Shoah. Further research will have to establish the exact chain of events. But for Jewish people in the Netherlands the attitude of Juliana – at least – causes questioning.”

The Jewish community has always been very pro-royal dynasty. Until today in the synagogue services there are standard prayers for the royal family.

Questions by the NIW to the Nieuwe Baarnsche School – to which the article had been made available beforehand – did not get any answers.