Children’s story about bats


This video is called Fun Facts About Bats.

From the site of NASA in the USA, where the story continues:

THE STORY OF Echo the Bat

In the upper elevations of Arizona, there was a forest of tall Ponderosa pine trees. The forest was covered with snow and the evenings were quiet as animals slept through the cold winter nights. When spring arrived, the snow melted and a colony of female bats made their home in a hollow pine tree to raise their young.

Echo and his mom hang upside down safe in their tree. Echo is under his mom’s wings. There is a crescent moon outside.

Unlike birds who hatch from eggs, bats are mammals. The mother bats will give birth to their young and feed them mother’s milk. Because their pups are too young to fly and catch their food, Mother bats care for their pups during the first month.

As the warm days of spring led to summer, a baby bat was born. He had a tiny, furry body with awkward wings. His mother held him close to her and wrapped him in her wings. All day long, she could hear his chirping cry echo through the hollow tree. From that day on, his mother called him “Echo.”

Kayakers rescue trapped young dolphin, video


This video from Scotland says about itself:

30 June 2015

Three juvenile dolphins in Northbay on the Isle of Barra. One of the dolphins was completely trapped in seaweed and shallow water. After a successful rescue the dolphin joined the other two for a fine display of thanks! Rescue was performed by a group from Clearwater Paddling.

See also here.

Little tern chicks on Vlieland island, video


Adult little terns are fairly small. However, as this 4 July 2015 video from the Vliehors, the western part of Vlieland island in the Netherlands shows, their chicks are still a lot smaller.

Rare flowers back on Dutch fields


Corn-cockle

Translated from the Dutch Natuurmonumenten conservation organisation:

Saturday, July 4th, 2015

An extraordinary discovery in Salland [region in Overijssel province]. On cornfields the rare corn-cockle and corn marigold have been found. “Confirmation that the management by Natuurmonumenten is paying off,” says the Salland forester Marion Plagge.

Field management

Natural fields have almost disappeared. To turn the tide, Natuurmonumenten manages cornfields in nature reserve Eerde and National Park The Salland Ridge. The nature organization is working here together successfully with organic farmers. On these cornfields no poison or fertilizer is used, but only solid manure of organic origin.

Corn marigold

Give beach-nesting birds a chance


This video says about itself:

Beach-nesting birds nowadays have a difficult time finding quiet breeding grounds. This animation shows why quietness is so important and how we can help beach-nesting birds.

BirdLife International

Rare Amur leopards, from zoos to the wild


This is a Amur leopard video.

From Wildlife Extra:

Captive Amur Leopards to be released into the Russian Far East

A plan to reintroduce captive Amur Leopards into the Russian Far East has been formally approved by Russia’s Ministry of Natural Resources, the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) has announced

The site for the reintroduction has been agreed as Lazovsky Zapovednik (State Nature Reserve) in the South-Eastern-most tip of Russia.

The Critically Endangered Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) is probably the only large cat for which a reintroduction programme using zoo stock is considered a necessary conservation action.

There are currently estimated to be between 50-70 left in the wild, in a small pocket of Russia between Vladivostok and the Sino-Russian border. Around 220 Amur leopards are currently in zoos throughout Europe, Russia, North America and Japan, as part of a global conservation breeding programme jointly coordinated by ZSL and Moscow Zoo.

Established pairs of breeding leopards from the breeding programme will be transported to Russia where they will live in specially constructed enclosures. Here they will be allowed to breed and rear cubs, which will learn to live in that environment from the very start of their lives. Once they are suitably mature, the cubs will be released.

There is no fixed timeframe in place as yet but it has been suggested that construction of the facilities may start in spring 2016, and leopards could be released in 2017.

ZSL will soon start analysis of which leopards will be initially used.

More information about the reintroduction programme, including the approved plan, can be found on the Amur Leopard and Tiger Alliance website.