Turkish women demonstrate against rape, murder


This video from Turkey says about itself:

14 February 2015

Women in Turkey have raised reactions to the savage murder of Özgecan Aslan.

On Feb 11th, Ozgecan Aslan (20) university student, caught a bus from Adana to Mersin as was her routine from school to home. As the last passenger gets off the bus, she’s left alone with the driver, his father and his friend. Two days later, three suspects were captured and Özgecan’s body was found. Initial autopsy report shows young woman was stabbed to death after she was raped, and then her body was burnt.

Aktivist Kamera 14.02.2015 Kadıköy / İstanbul

Twenty-year-old Özgecan Aslan was a psychology student at Çağ University in Mersin. DHA Photo

From Doğan News Agency in Turkey:

20-year-old Turkish woman brutally murdered, body burned

The burned body of a 20-year-old female student who had been missing for two days was discovered Feb. 13 in a riverbed in the Tarsus district of the southern province of Mersin.

Three suspects have been detained for stabbing Özgecan Aslan to death and later burning her remains.

The family of Aslan, who was a psychology student at Çağ University, had filed a missing report with the police on Feb. 11 after failing to contact her. As the search for the missing girl continued, gendarmerie forces stopped a suspicious minibus on Feb. 12, discovering blood stains and a hat in the minibus.

The driver of the vehicle, 26-year-old S.A., his 50-year-old father, N.A., and 20-year-old F.G. were detained when the victim’s father recognized the hat and said it belonged to his daughter.

During the interrogation, N.A. and F.G. admitted to the crime. According to the suspects’ testimonies, after all other passengers disembarked from the minibus, S.A. exited the scheduled route in spite of Aslan’s protestations and drove to a secluded spot.

When he attempted to rape the woman, she fought back and used pepper spray against her attacker. S.A. then stabbed Aslan several times and hit her with an iron pipe, killing her.

He also allegedly cut off Aslan’s fingers in an effort to ensure that no DNA match would be made with the scratches the woman made on his face during the struggle.

After the murder, S.A. went back home with the body and asked for his father and friend’s help in disposing of the remains. The three then tried to burn Aslan’s body to eliminate any evidence.

The remains of a woman were found Feb. 13 at a location indicated by the suspects. One of Aslan’s close friends, who was with her on the day she went missing, failed to identify the severely damaged body, but she said the clothes on the body matched what Aslan wore the day she disappeared.

“We were together at the school until noon, then we went shopping, ate something and got on a minibus to go home,” the witness said. “I got off near my home and she stayed on the minibus to go home. I later learned that she did not go home and was missing.”

The gendarmerie and the police have launched an investigation to find out the details and the reasons for the murder.

February/14/2015

Women carry the coffin of Özgecan Aslan, who was killed during a rape attempt

From Doğan News Agency in Turkey:

Women defy imam in murdered woman’s funeral, carry the coffin

Thousands bid farewell on Feb. 14 to Özgecan Aslan, a 20-year-old woman who was murdered during a rape attempt, in a funeral ceremony held in her hometown Mersin.

Although the imam requested women to step back during the ceremony, hundreds of women attended the funeral prayer on the front lines, while they also carried he coffin of Aslan before and after the prayer. …

Songül Aslan, mother of Özgecan, was devastated. …

“Özgecan had a wonderful heart, she would work hard, help everyone. I cannot accept that she was massacred when she took a minibus to come home. Is my daughter’s only mistake is to get on a minibus to come home?” she added. …

Protests have been held across the country to protest the brutal murder, with the demonstrators carrying photographs of Aslan and other female victims of violence.

February/14/2015

See also here.

From Revolution News:

Turkey: Outrage over Horrific Rape and Murder of Student Ozgecan Aslan

02/14/2015

On Feb 11th, Ozgecan Aslan, a 20-year-old university student, caught a bus from Adana to Mersin as was her routine from school to home. As the last passenger gets off the bus, she’s left alone with the driver, his father and his friend. Two days later, three suspects were captured and Özgecan’s body was found. Initial autopsy report shows young woman was stabbed to death after she was raped, and then her body was burnt.

Women all over Turkey are organizing protests today, claiming this is not “just another criminal incident”, but a result of a systematic misogynist state policy. Recent declarations by government officials against women’s employment, abortion, and similar statements to restrict women’s rights including even “when to go out and what to wear” have been responded to with public outrage. Also, perpetrators of rape and murder of women get the minimum sentence due to “incitement” or “consent” by the victim or “no psychological damage observed” on the victim. The extent of femicide in Turkey has once again been revealed by the murder of Ozgecan Aslan, while according to official figures murders of women have increased 1,400% during the period of AKP rule.

Turkish women demonstrate against the murder of Ozgecan Aslan

FIVE Turkish MPs were injured yesterday in a brawl that broke out in parliament. The fight started after opposition parties submitted motions to hamper the passage of a draconian new Bill restricting the right to protest: here.

Turkish government party praises Charlie Hebdo murderers


Politicians in Paris, separate from Charlie Hebdo marchers

By Bill Van Auken:

A Potemkin gathering of world leaders in Paris

14 January 2015

A photograph posted on social media has revealed that the “world leaders” who had supposedly led the march in Paris on January 11, in the aftermath of the attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo, were in reality assembled for a massive staged photo-op.

While in the media, photos and video of the leaders were almost invariably angled to give the appearance of massive crowds in their wake, one shot taken from above shows them standing bunched tightly together in barely a dozen rows in an empty street, cordoned off from the marchers by a heavy ring of security.

Nothing could more accurately symbolize the reactionary character of this assemblage of state officials and the fraud of their attempt to posture as defenders of human liberties.

One of these self-styled ‘defenders of press freedom’ was the prime minister of Turkey. Turkey, a faithful ally in the NATO military alliance.

About Davutoglu:

Prime Minister … Davutoglu of Turkey, which imprisons more journalists than any other country in the world

Mr Davutoglu’s repression of Turkish journalists is not the only reason why it is hypocritical for him to pose as a defender of free speech and “JeSuisCharlie” in France.

At the same time while Mr Davutoglu says “JeSuisCharlie” in Paris, fellow members of his AKP governing party say “Je suis the murderers at Charlie Hebdo“.

From ANF/OKTAY CANDEMİR – BİTLİS, Turkey, 11-01-2015:

AKP municipality declares Kouachi brothers to be ‘martyrs’

Posters have been put up on municipal billboards in the Tatvan district of Bitlis province declaring that the Kouachi brothers who carried out the attack on the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris on 7 January are martyrs.

The posters, put up in the AKP-run municipality, declared that: “Greetings to the Kouachi brothers who took revenge for the prophet of Allah. May Allah accept your sacrifice. …”

While it is not clear who put the posters up yesterday afternoon, the AKP municipality has neither made any comment, nor removed the posters, despite public reaction.

By Noam Chomsky:

The world reacted with horror to the murderous attack on the French satirical journal Charlie Hebdo. In the New York Times, veteran Europe correspondent Steven Erlanger graphically described the immediate aftermath, what many call France’s 9/11, as “a day of sirens, helicopters in the air, frantic news bulletins; of police cordons and anxious crowds; of young children led away from schools to safety. It was a day, like the previous two, of blood and horror in and around Paris.” The enormous outcry worldwide was accompanied by reflection about the deeper roots of the atrocity. “Many Perceive a Clash of Civilizations,” a New York Times headline read.

The reaction of horror and revulsion about the crime is justified, as is the search for deeper roots, as long as we keep some principles firmly in mind. The reaction should be completely independent of what thinks about this journal and what it produces. The passionate and ubiquitous chants “I am Charlie,” and the like, should not be meant to indicate, even hint at, any association with the journal, at least in the context of defense of freedom of speech. Rather, they should express defense of the right of free expression whatever one thinks of the contents, even if they are regarded as hateful and depraved.

The Kouachi brothers did not speak for Muslims any more than self-professed Christian Anders Breivik spoke for Christians, says John Haylett: here.

Police from several UK forces seek details of Charlie Hebdo readers. Newsagents in three counties questioned about sales of the French magazine’s special issue: here.

Turkish football supporters’ life imprisonment for criticizing government corruption?


This video says about itself:

Ground Zero: Turkey – The Protesters of Gezi Park

2 July 2013

Journalist Tim Pool recently joined the VICE editorial staff to cover breaking news, and his first assignment was to fly down to Istanbul and do a live stream of the protests against the construction of a mall in Gezi Park and Prime Minister Erdogan’s Islamist policies. Tim also produced this documentary about the uprising, which includes interviews with protesters on the ground as well info about the failure of the Turkish media to properly give a shit about the situation.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands today:

In Istanbul the trial started of 35 supporters of the hard core of the football club Besiktas. They are accused that they have tried to overthrow the Turkish government last year during the Gezi protests. They risk life imprisonment.

Last summer Gezi Park and Taksim Square in Istanbul were the scene of mass protests against the government. …

The lawsuit against the 35 Carsi members encounters much criticism both in Turkey and abroad. At the court in Istanbul this morning, there were expressions of support from hundreds of football supporters, also from rival clubs. They waved flags and sang songs.

Human rights organization Human Rights Watch (HRW) calls the trial ridiculous. There was no evidence for a coup. According to HRW, the indictment proves that Erdogan puts pressure on courts to suppress resistance him in the bud.

Turkish government mounts police state crackdown on opposition media: here.