Donald Trump’s war in Africa, war on Iran?


This video from the USA says about itself:

Decertifying Iran Deal, Trump Escalates His War

13 October 2017

President Trump’s de-certification of the Iran nuclear deal and targeting of the Revolutionary Guard is a dangerous escalation, says Reza Marashi of the National Iranian American Council.

Why is the US at war in West Africa? The October 4 killings of four US Green Berets in Niger has provided a rare glimpse into far-reaching American military operations which have been conducted almost entirely in secret: here.

US President Donald Trump vowed Friday that he will use his presidential powers to blow up the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran unless it is amended to Washington’s satisfaction: here.

Trump’s aggressive course of action against Iran has provoked a strong reaction in Berlin, where German politicians and media figures are openly discussing a break with the US: here.

Trump raises danger of war after move on Iran nuclear deal, Germany warns. ‘My big concern is that what is happening in Iran, or with Iran from the US perspective, will not remain an Iranian issue,’ says German foreign minister: here.

President Donald Trump’s declaration Friday that he stands ready to pull the plug on the Iran nuclear deal if it is not renegotiated to Washington’s liking has aggravated tensions between Washington and its ostensible European allies, and also been met with domestic criticism: here.

Trump, Iran and the US drive for world hegemony: here.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told CNN’s “State of the Union” that US diplomatic efforts to end the dangerous confrontation with North Korea would continue “until the first bomb drops.” Far from offering any reassurance of a peaceful solution, Tillerson’s remarks underscore the advanced state of US preparations for, in Trump’s words, the “total destruction” of North Korea, a country of 25 million people: here.

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Donald Trump about Africa


The world according to Donald Trump

United States President Donald Trump did not just threaten North Korea with nuclear war in his United Nations speech.

He spoke about Africa as well.

From the Huffington Post in the USA today:

HERE’S WHAT TRUMP HAD TO SAY ABOUT AFRICA AT THE UN I have so many friends going to your countries trying to get rich.” He also saluted the nonexistent country of Nambia. Stephen Colbert had a field day with his screw-up. [HuffPost]

Perhaps the president of the USA meant ‘Narnia‘ when talking about ‘Nambia’?

Secretary bird video


This is a secretary bird video.

These birds live in Africa.

African rhinos in love, video


This video says about itself:

First Time Rhino Affection Caught On Film – Africa – BBC Earth

14 August 2017

Whilst filming at night the team witness rhinos showing affection for the first time!

African leopards, new study


This 2015 documentary video is about leopards in Africa.

From the University of California – Santa Cruz in the USA:

African leopards revealed: Study documents minute-to-minute behavior of elusive cats

Results illuminate the energetic ‘cost’ of their drive to kill and pave the way for greater understanding of the ecosystem impacts of predation

June 21, 2017

The elusive behavior of the African leopard has been revealed in great detail for the first time as part of a sophisticated study that links the majestic cat’s caloric demands and its drive to kill.

A team led by Chris Wilmers, associate professor of environmental studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz, produced an unprecedented picture of this carnivore’s predatory and reproductive behaviour by outfitting the cats with high-tech wildlife tracking collars equipped with GPS technology and an accelerometer to measure energy output.

“This is the first time we’ve had really detailed energetic data from a wild terrestrial mammal over an extended period,” said Wilmers, lead author of a new paper, “Energetics-informed Behavioral States Reveal the Drive to Kill in African Leopards,” which appears today (June 21, 2017) in the online edition of the journal Ecosphere.

The team gathered data from five animals over two months: one adult male; one adult female with one cub; one adult female without cubs; one yearling male cub; and a young “dispersal-aged” male ready to establish his own territory. “The sample size is small, but we got lucky with the diversity of age and sex,” noted Wilmers.

Information gleaned from the collars allowed Wilmers’ team to match the leopards‘ behavior with time and place, enabling them to assess the energetic “costs” of reproductive behavior — dispersal and territorial patrol for males; parenting for females.

The study revealed that for male African leopards, territorial patrol activities account for 26 percent of their daily caloric intake; for females, parenting a one-year old offspring consumes 8 percent of their calories.

“Energetics is the ultimate currency for an animal’s survival,” said Wilmers. “To survive, an animal needs to balance the calories it’s expending with the calories it’s taking in. If it wants to reproduce, it has to run an energetic surplus.”

Wilmers, a wildlife ecologist who studies animal behavior and its cascading effects on ecosystems, continued: “Based on what the leopards are doing, they run up different energetic budgets, which in turn influence their drive to kill. They might kill more prey, bigger prey, or go after more desirable prey in more dangerous places — closer to humans, for example.”

One of the most striking behaviors described in the study was a kill by the adult male leopard. The data document him approaching a small village in a meandering fashion. He attacks and kills a goat inside a pen, then spends five minutes dragging the goat across the river to a spot where vegetation gives him the cover he needs to begin feeding.

“It gives us incredible insight into their behavior to see where they are moving and what they’re doing on such a fine time scale,” said Wilmers. “This allows us to see these cryptic animals moving through their environment.”

Another example details the behavior of the adult female with a yearling cub. She kills an aardwolf (a small insect-eating [hyena-like] mammal), feeds a bit, then meanders and rests for a few hours until she kills an impala (a medium-sized antelope that is common prey for African leopards). She feeds briefly, then walks directly back to her cub, guiding it first to the aardwolf and then the impala.

Additionally, Wilmers was able to calculate and then compare the energetics of the mother and her son as they traveled together, concluding that the cub expended 12 percent more energy to travel the same distance.

African leopards are among the most elusive mammals on the planet — more so than African lions or cheetahs. “Their whole strategy is to be elusive,” said Wilmers. “People get glimpses of them, but that’s all. Looking at this data is like going on a safari for the first time and seeing an animal you’ve only seen in captivity before.”

These fine-grained energetics data open the door to understanding the ecological consequences of the leopard’s predatory drive. Knowing the African leopard’s energetic needs allows researchers to evaluate where they hunt, what they hunt, and to estimate the level of risk they might be willing to take in pursuit of attractive prey. In combination, these factors have implications for humans and the livestock that often share habitat with African leopards.

The placement of a fence, for example, could have energetic “costs” for leopards if they have to travel farther — expending more energy — to patrol territory, hunt, and provide for their offspring. Those costs would increase their drive to kill. “They might take bigger risks, they might catch larger prey like impala, and that could effect the impala population and what they feed on,” said Wilmers, outlining the “cascade” of ecosystem effects that could follow human changes to the landscape.

“To be able to link behavior to energetics to ecological effects is an important conceptual advance,” said Wilmers. “Once you understand how that circle works, we can assess how our actions will impact the animals, and how those effects will play out on the ecosystem.”

Lesser grey shrike video


This is a lesser grey shrike video.

These birds live in Europe and Asia, and winter in Africa.