Coral reefs, parrotfish poop and sand


This video says about itself:

Parrotfish Poop! | JONATHAN BIRD’S BLUE WORLD Extra

23 September 2016

In this short Jonathan Bird’s Blue World Extra, Jonathan discusses where sand comes from and you may be surprised to learn that a lot of sand is actually fish poop!

Jonathan Bird’s Blue World is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure program that airs on public television in the United States.

Osprey catches flatfish, video


This 21 September 2016 video shows an osprey catching a flatfish, near Oostvoorne in the Netherlands.

Diego Jansen made this video.

Dutch North Sea reef underwater wildlife, video


This 16 September 2016 is about the Dutch North Sea reef Borkumse Stenen, its fish, tube worms, soft coral, sea anemones and other underwater wildlife.

World’s oldest fishhooks discovered


World's oldest fishhooks, photo National Academy of Sciences

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Fishhooks, oldest in the world, found in Japan

18 September 2016

Archaeologists have found the oldest fishhooks in the world in Japan. They were in a cave on Okinawa island and are estimated to be 23,000 years old.

The hooks are made from a sea snail‘s shell. From this discovery archeologists conclude that fishing techniques have existed already much longer than expected, and were used in more places in the world.

Eels and frogs

Okinawa was first inhabited around 35,000 years ago. Scientists wondered how people there survived all the time. The fishhooks have answered that question.

In Sakitari cave researchers found also remains of eels, frogs, birds and small terrestrial animals. They conclude from that these were also on the menu of the first inhabitants of Okinawa.

East Timor

Until now, scientists assumed that the fishhook was invented about 16,000 years ago.

They based themselves on a find in East Timor in 2011. In the northern part along the coast hooks were found which were made of shellfish.

Venomous fish video


This video says about itself:

16 September 2016

While most fish are completely harmless to people, there are some species that are mildly to extremely venomous and can actually kill humans. Jonathan travels the world to meet some of the most venomous fish in the sea.

Seahorses mating in Zeeland video


This June 2016 video is about two seahorses mating in the Oosterschelde estuary in Zeeland province in the Netherlands.