Indonesian fish and coral research


Whale shark

November 2011. Read here about marine research in Indonesia: tagging whale sharks, maybe new fish species discovered, and coral.

Tiger sharks studied


This July 2015 video from the USA says about itself:

Tiger Shark Sinks its Teeth Into Scientific Study

In this video, a tiger shark investigates and eventually bites an underwater hydrophone set up by scientists at the University of Miami to study tiger shark movements.

This is part of a larger collaborative research project on the behavior and ecology of tiger sharks in the subtropical Atlantic Ocean.

To learn more visit: SharkTagging.com.

Read more in National Geographic.

Caribbean lionfish toxic


Lionfish

November 2011: Research on invasive lionfish in the Caribbean sea around St Maarten island has revealed many of these fish are toxic, so they should not be eaten: here.

Grey heron tries to catch fish, video


In this video, a grey heron tries to catch a fish. But will it succeed?

Michael de Vries from the Netherlands made the video.

Western Australian fish threatened by climate change


This video is called Wildlife of Western Australia.

From the Australian Broadcasting Corporation:

Tropical fish in WA Kimberley facing extinction from climate change, researchers say

By Erin Parke

12 July 2015

Entire species of tropical fish could be wiped out by climate change, according to a research team that has spent months carrying out a study in Western Australia’s north.

The team from the University of Melbourne is looking at how sensitive freshwater species are to small increases in water temperatures.

PhD student Matthew Le Feuvre said the results were cause for concern.

“We’re finding a lot of species are living potentially very close to their maximum thermal limit, so these species will be very sensitive should the climate change in the Kimberley,” Mr Le Feuvre said.

“If water temperatures and air temperatures increase by just a degree or two, you could potentially see a lot of species fail to adapt and go extinct as a result, or at least become far more vulnerable.”

The team focussed on 18 species that are found only in the river systems of the Kimberley.

Until now, little research has been done on the river systems, partly because they are located in remote areas accessible only by helicopter or boat.

The University of Melbourne study involved eight months of trekking and camping in some of the most rugged terrain in Australia, to allow researchers to collect specimens.

“We’ll arrive at a beautiful spot in the Kimberley with a ute and a trailer fully loaded with sampling gear and a tinny, and then we basically throw the whole kitchen sink at it,” Le Feuvre said.

“We use a variety of nets, a baited underwater video camera, and we use an electro-fisher, which basically stuns the fish in the water and then you can scoop them out, which is a really useful tool for sampling fish.

“We also use traditional hook and line fishing techniques and also snorkelling, so we use a whole lot of methods at each site for a couple of days.”

The fish were packed into customised eskies for the 4,000 kilometre flight to laboratories at the University of Melbourne.

Testing Begins

In Melbourne, they were put into a flow-rest barometer, to measure the amount of oxygen they consumed as the water temperature was increased in tiny increments.

That is when the sensitivity of the fish was discovered, Mr Le Feuvre said.

“We’ve found that these species basically fail to function above 34 degrees, which is roughly the temp of the water you find in the Drysdale river in the wet season,” he said.

The Kimberley species were also considered to be highly vulnerable because of their unusually limited range.

“The Mitchell Falls Gudgeon [for example] is only found around the Mitchell Falls, so it’s only known for a couple of kilometres upstream from the falls, and a couple of kilometres downstream from the falls,” Mr Le Feuvre said.

“There’s one species from the Drysdale River that’s only been caught once… so it’s a really rare species and we failed to find it in more than eight months of fieldwork.”

It is hoped the work results in some of the species being added to a national register of threatened species.

While 20 per cent of Australian freshwater fish species are currently included on the register, none of the endemic Kimberley species are listed.

Conservation group Environs Kimberley said the research work was groundbreaking.

“So little research has been done in the remote areas of the Kimberley, and there’s so much more work to be done up there,” said Marine Projects Officer Jason Fowler.

“It’s certainly going to help build a case to protect these river systems.”

Sharks like death metal music


This video says about itself:

Sharks Love Death Metal

9 July 2015

The team trades chum for music, hoping to strike a chord with nearby great whites. Luckily (or not), great whites have an ear for death metal.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Death metal music attracts sharks, documentary crew finds out

The low, rumbling frequencies of death metal mimic the sounds of struggling fish

Doug Bolton

Friday 10 July 2015

A documentary film crew hit upon a novel technique to attract great white sharks – blasting death metal through an underwater speaker.

The Discovery Channel crew, filming for the Shark Week show Bride of Jaws, were on the hunt for a large great white, wonderfully nicknamed ‘Joan of Shark’.

Desperate to feature the 16-foot, 1.6 tonne shark in their documentary, they submerged a speaker to see if the shark would react. Unfortunately they didn’t manage to attract Joan, but did catch the attention of two others, one of which was 12 feet long.

Sharks ‘hear’ by picking up vibrations from receptors on their bodies, meaning they can be attracted to the low-frequency vibrations of heavy music, which apparently sounds like struggling fish.

It’s an odd tactic, but one that’s apparently well-known by shark hunters. Matt Walller, a shark tour operator in Australia, found out that AC/DC records caused sharks to change their behaviour.

When he played the tunes from underwater speakers, the sharks swam straight up to his boat, brushing their heads against the submerged diving cage.

Other than being a boon for metal fans on shark tours, using music, instead of bait, could be more environmentally friendly.

Read more: A close call with a Great White

Surfer films his near miss with a huge shark

Great white sharks – the misunderstood giants

Filmmakers and shark-spotters usually use chum, a mix of fish parts, bones and blood, to attract sharks. By reducing the amount of chum they give to the sharks, humans will be able to reduce their impact on the shark’s natural behaviour.

And concerns that luring sharks with bait can draw them closer to human occupied shores means Pine Knoll Shores, a town on the coast of North Carolina, is currently debating whether to ban the practice, due to eight people already being bitten by sharks in the area this summer.

If the practice of attracting sharks with death metal spreads, record labels could find a lucrative new niche market.

This video says about itself:

Turning Tides: Towards a Bluer Tomorrow | WCS Gala 2015

11 June 2015

While oceans cover 70 percent of the world’s surface, only one percent is truly protected. We depend on the oceans for our food, our livelihoods, our lives. WCS has been a leader in marine scientific discovery and conservation for more than 100 years. In this short video, we lay out our vision to protect 10% of the worlds oceans by 2020. Join us as we turn the tides towards a bluer tomorrow.

Young plaice tries to hide, video


This video shows a young European plaice, four centimeter in size, trying to hide in the sand near Schiermonnikoog island in the Netherlands during ebb.

Jan Veen made this video.

North Sea plaice: here.