World’s oldest fishhooks discovered

World's oldest fishhooks, photo National Academy of Sciences

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Fishhooks, oldest in the world, found in Japan

18 September 2016

Archaeologists have found the oldest fishhooks in the world in Japan. They were in a cave on Okinawa island and are estimated to be 23,000 years old.

The hooks are made from a sea snail‘s shell. From this discovery archeologists conclude that fishing techniques have existed already much longer than expected, and were used in more places in the world.

Eels and frogs

Okinawa was first inhabited around 35,000 years ago. Scientists wondered how people there survived all the time. The fishhooks have answered that question.

In Sakitari cave researchers found also remains of eels, frogs, birds and small terrestrial animals. They conclude from that these were also on the menu of the first inhabitants of Okinawa.

East Timor

Until now, scientists assumed that the fishhook was invented about 16,000 years ago.

They based themselves on a find in East Timor in 2011. In the northern part along the coast hooks were found which were made of shellfish.

Venomous fish video

This video says about itself:

16 September 2016

While most fish are completely harmless to people, there are some species that are mildly to extremely venomous and can actually kill humans. Jonathan travels the world to meet some of the most venomous fish in the sea.

Seahorses mating in Zeeland video

This June 2016 video is about two seahorses mating in the Oosterschelde estuary in Zeeland province in the Netherlands.

Californian tidewater gobies two species, not one

This video says about itself:

California Wildlife — Tidewater Goby

3 November 2013

Classified as a Protected (Vulnerable) species by the IUCN.

Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve & Wetlands, Huntington Beach, California, USA

From Science News in the USA:

California’s goby is actually two different fish

Southern version gets its own name

By Amy McDermott

6:00am, September 6, 2016

It’s official: The southern tidewater goby is a thing. And it’s chubbier and nubbier than its northern cousin.

Endangered tidewater gobies live in California’s seaside lagoons. Ranging roughly the entire length of the state, the fish used to be considered one species. But a new study confirms that gobies living in Northern and Southern California are physically different, and now the southern swimmer has its own name: Eucyclogobius kristinae.

The northern goby, E. newberryi, is sleeker and longer than its southern counterpart. The southern fish has more girth and more nubby sensory organs exposed atop its head, researchers report July 27 in PLOS ONE.

Differences in DNA, found in earlier studies, suggest that the fish separated over a million years ago, probably because of geology. Tidewater gobies can dart from pool to pool in the rainy season but can become isolated by outcrops of rock or kelp. Today, the southern goby is found only in three coastal pools in San Diego’s Camp Pendleton. The fish used to range north from San Diego County about 200 kilometers, says geobiologist David Jacobs of UCLA, who codiscovered the new species. As coastal cities grew, the goby lost habitat. Now that the southern species has its own name, Jacobs says, California is more likely to give it extra protection.

Small-spotted catshark swimming off Ireland

This video says about itself:

[Small-spotted] Catshark swimming in Howth Harbour in Dublin, Ireland

29 August 2016

[Small-spotted] catshark is a species of shark that can be seen in the sea and ocean that surrounds Ireland and the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. The catshark is a predatory shark and it likes to hunt and eat a variety of aquatic creatures. This catshark found its way out off the Irish Sea and into Howth Harbour in Dublin, Ireland. It found a great place to hunt and catch fish when it gets hungry, a predatory shark like this will have no problem catching fish in Howth Harbour.