Indonesian Muslim girls play heavy metal rock


This video says about itself:

Heavy Metal Hijabis

25 July 2018

The town of Garut in Western Java, Indonesia is a quiet place—that is, until Voice of Baceprot takes the stage. While most people in the town live tranquil, pastoral lives, teenagers Firdda, Widia and Euis thrash out and rock hard. The band has shot to fame for playing heavy metal in the religiously conservative country. After gaining popularity, VoB began to face criticism for performing while wearing hijabs. Still, they continue to shred—an inspiration for everyone with a little bit of music and a little bit of hardcore rebellion in their souls.

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Guatemalan rock band against racism


This video says about itself:

A Rock Band Fights Back Against Racism and Xenophobia

23 July 2018

The Guatemalan rock band Alux Nahual is fighting against recent attacks against Latinos simply for speaking Spanish in the United States with the song “I speak Spanish, y qué?!”. They hope they will raise awareness on racism and xenophobia.

96-year-old Holocaust survivor sings heavy metal rock


This music video says about itself:

93-year-old Metal Grandma Holocaust Survivor Spy! “Totenköpfchen” (Laugh at Death) -Swiss Eurovision 2015

31 October 2014

Inge & the TritoneKings “Totenköpfchen”

Inge Ginsberg survived the Holocaust and became a spy for the Americans during WWII, smuggling arms to fight the Nazis. She married a composer and they wrote songs together in the 1940’s and 50’s that were sung by Nat King Cole, Dean Martin, Doris Day, and Rosemary Clooney, among others. 60 years later, she got back into music and fell in love with Heavy Metal, which she now performs with world-renowned classical musicians Lucia Caruso and Pedro da Silva – a.k.a. the TritoneKings.

By Haley Cohen in the USA:

WATCH: Holocaust Survivor Known As ‘Death Metal Grandma’ Rocks The Stage

18 July 2018

Many decades after fleeing the Holocaust, a 96-year-old grandmother found her passion in fronting a death metal band, The New York Times reported.

Inge Ginsberg, originally from Austria, and her husband Otto Kollman ended up in Hollywood after spending some time in a Swiss refugee camp. Their new life included composing for some of the most well-known singers of their generation, including Nat King Cole and Doris Day.

As she continued to write song lyrics over the years, Ginsberg felt she had to make a change to stand out in a society where older women are silenced — which brought her to death metal, a genre in which you can shout your lyrics instead of sing them.

At age 93, Ginsberg formed the band TritoneKings, and continues to sing — or scream— about her own struggles and experiences.

Ms Ginsberg reminds me of another Holocaust survivor: Ms Esther Béjarano. She is one of two surviving members of the women’s’ orchestra at Auschwitz death camp; playing accordion and recorder. Now 93 years old, with both German and Israeli nationality, she is an active anti-fascist, chair of the International Auschwitz Committee, honorary chair of the German association of people persecuted by the nazis and member of the German communist party. She sings Jewish and anti-fascist songs; and she also sings rap.

This 2013 music video is Esther Béjarano and Turkish German rappers Microphone Mafia singing the Italian anti-fascist song Bella Ciao.

Pistol shrimp named after Pink Floyd band


This video says about itself:

12 April 2017

A new species of shrimp has been named after Pink Floyd thanks to a pact between prog rock-loving scientists.

The Synalpheus pinkfloydi uses its large pink claw to create a noise so loud it can kill small fish.

The team behind the discovery vowed years ago if it ever found a new pink shrimp it would “honour” the rockers.

Sammy De Grave, head of research at Oxford University Museum of National History, said he has been a fan of the band since he was a teenager.

He said: “I have been listening to Floyd since The Wall was released in 1979, when I was 14 years old.

“The description of this new species of pistol shrimp was the perfect opportunity to finally give a nod to my favourite band.

“We are all Pink Floyd fans, and we always said if we would find a pink one, a new species of pink shrimp, we would name it after Pink Floyd.”

The pistol, or snapping shrimp, has an ability to generate sonic energy by closing their enlarged claw at rapid speed.

It can reach 210 decibels – louder than your average rock concert – and results in one of the loudest sounds in the ocean.

The description of the species, found off the Pacific coast of Panama, has been published in the Zootaxa journal and was co-authored with the Universidade Federal de Goiás in Brazil, and Seattle University in the US.

Source: here.

From the University of Oxford in England:

Rock giants Pink Floyd honoured in naming of newly discovered, bright pink pistol shrimp

April 12, 2017

Summary: A fuchsia pink-clawed species of pistol shrimp, discovered on the Pacific coast of Panama, has been given the ultimate rock and roll name in recognition of the discoverers’ favorite rock band Pink Floyd.

A strikingly bright pink-clawed species of pistol shrimp, discovered on the Pacific coast of Panama, has been given the ultimate rock and roll name in recognition of the discoverers’ favourite rock band — Pink Floyd.

The conspicuously coloured pistol shrimp has been named as Synalpheus pinkfloydi in the scientific description of the species, published in Zootaxa journal.

Just like all good rock bands, pistol shrimps, or snapping shrimps, have an ability to generate substantial amounts of sonic energy. By closing its enlarged claw at rapid speed the shrimp creates a high-pressure cavitation bubble, the implosion of which results in one of the loudest sounds in the ocean — strong enough to stun or even kill a small fish.

Combined with its distinct, almost glowing-pink snapping claw, Synalpheus pinkfloydi is aptly named by the report’s authors, Arthur Anker of the Universidade Federal de Goiás in Brazil, Kristin Hultgren of Seattle University in the USA, and Sammy De Grave, of Oxford University Museum of Natural History.

De Grave has been a life-long Pink Floyd fan and has been waiting for the opportunity to name the right new species after the band.

“I have been listening to Floyd since The Wall was released in 1979, when I was 14 years old. I’ve seen them play live several times since, including the Hyde Park reunion gig for Live8 in 2005. The description of this new species of pistol shrimp was the perfect opportunity to finally give a nod to my favourite band,” he says.

Arthur Anker, the report’s lead author, says: “I often play Pink Floyd as background music while I’m working, but now the band and my work have been happily combined in the scientific literature.”

Synalpheus pinkfloydi is not the only pistol shrimp with such a lurid claw. It’s closely-related and similar-looking sister species, Synalpheus antillensis, scientifically described in 1909, is found in the western Atlantic, including the Caribbean side of Panama. But the authors of the new paper found that the two species show considerable genetic divergence, granting S. pinkfloydi a new species status and its very own rock and roll name.

Animals feature frequently in the Floyd back-catalogue. Indeed, the 1977 album Animals includes tracks titled Dogs, Sheep, and a suite of music dedicated to pigs. Then there’s Several Species of Small Furry Animals Gathered Together in a Cave and Grooving with a Pict from 1969’s Ummagumma. In fact, other biologists have already named a damselfly after that album: Umma gumma, in the family Calopterygidae. However, until today there have been no crustacean names known to honour the band.

Rock ‘n roll pioneer Chuck Berry, RIP


This 2010 live music video is called Tina Turner & Chuck Berry – Rock ‘n roll music.

By Sara Boboltz in the USA today:

Rock ‘N’ Roll Legend Chuck Berry Dead At 90

The guitarist was known for a string of 1950s and ’60s hits.

Rock ’n’ roll pioneer Chuck Berry has died, police said Saturday. He was 90.

“The St. Charles County Police Department sadly confirms the death of Charles Edward Anderson Berry Sr., better known as legendary musician Chuck Berry,” police said in a statement posted to Facebook.

First responders were called out to a home on Buckner Road around 12:40 p.m. and found a man later identified as Berry unresponsive “and immediately administered lifesaving techniques,” the statement reads. They were unable to revive him and he was pronounced dead at 1:26 p.m.

Berry penned a great number of hits in the 1950s and ’60s like “Sweet Little Sixteen,” “Roll Over Beethoven” and “Rock and Roll Music” that influenced generations of rock groups, including The Beatles. Merging a captivating stage presence with his own blend of blues, country and jazz, Berry helped define the fledgling rock’n’ roll genre, later becoming one of the first musicians inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, Ohio.

Born into a middle-class family in St. Louis, Missouri, Berry picked up the basics of guitar from a neighbor and started performing music as a teenager. In 1952, he formed a trio with Johnnie Johnson on piano and Ebby Harding on drums that rose to fame in the local nightclub scene. To pay the bills, Berry worked as a hairdresser. But soon enough he wouldn’t have time for that ― a trip to Chicago netted a recording session with Chess Records, during which Berry performed an old hillbilly tune called “Ida Red.” Changing the name to “Maybellene,” Chess sent the track to an influential New York DJ, and it became a hit among the teenage set.

According to an oft-cited line by John Lennon, “If you tried to give rock ‘n’ roll another name, you might call it ‘Chuck Berry.’” Berry’s music became so well-known, he toured the country with only a guitar, trusting he’d be able to find musicians in each city he played who could serve as his back-up. Many of his lyrics focused on teen culture, although he was significantly past that age by the time he started traveling around singing about cars and dates.

But in the nascent era of the Civil Rights Movement, Berry’s status as a black man with a following of young white people ― a lot of them girls ― caused certain conflict. He’d been known to take refuge in police stations to dodge protesters after his shows, which sometimes featured police presence themselves, according to an Esquire profile. After a teenage coat-check girl who worked briefly at a club he owned alleged Berry had an affair with her, the guitarist served two years in prison. A tax evasion charge sent him to prison again, briefly, in 1979. …

Notoriously interview-shy, Berry had been living out his later years in Ladue, Missouri ― near his hometown. He never stopped writing music, and performed regular gigs at a local restaurant and club called Blueberry Hill.

British Rock Against Racism history


This 1978 music video from Britain is called Steel Pulse: Live at Rock Against Racism. Nazis Are No Fun.

By Felicity Collier in Britain:

Memories of movement that rocked racism to its core

Wednesday 21st December 2016

Reminiscences of RAR: Rocking Against Racism

1976 to 1982

Edited by Roger Huddle and Red Saunders
(Redwords, £15)

FOUR decades on from the birth of Rock Against Racism (RAR) more than 60 organisers, activists and musicians involved in the movement are reunited in this book to share their experiences of a pivotal moment in history.

The late 1970s Britain saw the racist National Front gaining support in elections. Despite their extremist intent, aided by Enoch Powell and Margaret Thatcher’s inciteful comments in the media, their numerous marches were regularly given police protection.

There was an increase in racist attacks on the streets, some of which claimed people’s lives, and rioting. Police harassment and brutality were rife and massive cuts to the NHS, housing provision and wages added up to a bleak picture.

To counteract the prevailing pessimism, the book’s editor and RAR founder Roger Huddle felt that: “if given a purpose, both black and white would unite against the overriding threat of the nazis.”

A united front — not just of young music fans but teachers, firefighters, miners, bus and rail workers — was born.

Memorably, RAR mobilised 80,000 people in London’s Victoria Park in 1978. “The media say the crowd came for the music. No, they came to march and chant and to rock against the NF and racism,” Huddle recalls.

Gigs across Britain, from punk to reggae to ska to soul, “mashed up the NF in a rub-a-dub style,” and fanzines like Temporary Hoarding came on the scene.

“We had to educate ourselves about the history of racism,” says its co-editor Lucy Toothpaste, who also seized opportunities to open up a dialogue with bands to challenge sexism.

Bend It Like Beckham director Gurinder Chadha, a teenager in the 1970s, says that RAR gave her the confidence to find a voice and “made me feel part of something bigger.”

The exuberance of the RAR gigs paved the way for the 200,000 who turned up for the Artists Against Apartheid concert on Clapham Common in 1986 and it was a movement that Steel Pulse’s Selwyn Brown sees as seminal.

“Even with the struggles that exist today, we can still proudly say we live in a multicultural society. Rock Against Racism played a major part in achieving that ideal,” he says. This book is invaluable in documenting the experiences of those who helped make that happen.

Rock Against Racism are looking for memorabilia of any kind from 1976-82 for their archival website. If you’ve got anything to donate, please contact Ruth Gregory by email: gregory.ruth@gmail.com

US musician Leon Russell, RIP


This music video from the USA is called Ballad For A Soldier. That Leon Russell song is about the Vietnam war, especially the massacre in My Lai village by United States Lieutenant William Calley.

The lyrics are:

When I was just a young boy, I played with swords and guns, and I dreamed of the day I’d become a soldier.
And kill all of the enemy, my country ’tis of thee.
I sing this anthem sadly, won’t you hear me.
I watched the cannons blazing, on the giant silver screen.
The swastikas were burning and the hero was me.
The general gave the order, gladly I obeyed.
But the movie faded quickly all at once today.
And now I stand alone with the charges made, nowhere to run, not a place to hide.
We’re sad little children playing grown-up games.
Guess the time has come, the damage has been done.
Stray dogs that live on the highway, walk on three legs.
Cause they learn too slow to get the message.
Just like the Indians in the early days.
Battles lost and won, yet it still goes on.
It’s just another ballad for a soldier.

I had no understanding ’till I saw my mother cry, when they told how many babies I had killed that night.
A dozen color photographs inside of a magazine, told the morbid story like a movie screen.
But I was not the hero I thought myself to be, movies are much different from reality.
The general was convicted to get off of the hook, but the President might free me for the chance I took.
And we all stand alone when the charge is made, sad way to live, what a way to die.
We’re all little children playing grown-up games, can we burn the gun before the next time comes.
Stray dogs that live on the highway walk on three legs, they move too slow to get the message.
Give up and win, that’s all I have to say, we haven’t really won till all the fightin’ done, and there are no more ballads for the soldiers.

From Leon Russell’s site:

Nov. 13, 2016

Leon Russell died on Nov. 13, 2016 in Nashville at the age of 74. His wife said that he passed away in his sleep
.
The Master Of Space And Time was a legendary musician and songwriter originally from Tulsa, Oklahoma who performed his gospel-infused southern boogie piano rock, blues, and country music for over 50 years.

Leon was inducted into both the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame and the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame in 2011.

Leon led the famous Joe Cocker’s ‘Mad Dogs & Englishmen’ tour and performed with George Harrison and Friends at the Concert For Bangladesh. Leon has also toured with Delaney & Bonnie and Friends, Edgar Winter, The New Grass Revival, Willie Nelson, and Sir Elton John.

Leon’s songwriting credits include ‘A Song For You’, ‘Delta Lady’, ‘Hummingbird’, ‘Lady Blue’, ‘Back To The Island’, ‘Tight Rope’, and ‘This Masquerade’.