Australian eagle takes down drone, video


This video says about itself:

2m Wedge-Tailed Eagle takes down Drone. Watch it Punch it out of the sky – Australia (Eagle is Fine)

8 August 2015

**Eagle was fine – she was massive, and used talons to ‘punch’ the drone out of the sky. Hung around overhead so I got a really good look. Eagle’s health was my main concern also**

This is the last thing a small bird sees when a Wedge-Tailed Eagle decides that you are dinner…

Do not fly drones near birds of prey, they clearly attack seeing you as a threat or the right sized dinner. This will cost you money and potentially harm to the bird. This one was fine.. the drone needed some attention before it could fly again.

If you see a bird of prey while flying. Land. I have added this to my operating procedure.

See also here.

One should hope more eagles in countries like Yemen or Pakistan may prevent some of the deaths of children and other civilians there by CIA or Pentagon drones.

White humpback whale off Queensland, Australia


This 10 August 2015 video is called Awesome footage of rare white whale off the coast of Australia | Mashable.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Rare albino humpback whale spotted off the coast of Queensland in Australia

It was spotted on Monday

Hardeep Matharu

Tuesday 11 August 2015

A rare albino humpback whale has been spotted off the coast of Australia.

The mammal, migrating from the Antarctic to warmer waters in the north, was spotted by tourists who had paid charter boats in Queensland, in Australia’s Gold Coast, on Monday.

Aerial footage taken by news cameras captured the moment the huge, unusual animal emerged from under the surface.

The sighting caused speculation as to whether the whale was in fact Migaloo, a world-famous albino humpback which was first seen in 1991 and is known to be one of the three white whales which live in the waters of Queensland.

But Trevor Long, Sea World marine services director, told ABC Radio that this was another albino whale, nicknamed the “Son of Migaloo”.

Mr Long said this animal was smaller and younger than Migaloo and was the other white whale which has been regularly sighted off the east coast of Australia since 2011, according to the Daily Telegraph.

Read more:

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A study in 2011 found that Migaloo lacked a gene for making an enzyme involved in making melanin, one of the primary dark pigments found in mammalian skin, explaining its light tone.

This particular variation type is reportedly hereditary, meaning it is possible that Migaloo could pass it on to an offspring.

Night parrot discovery in Australia


This video from Australia says about itself:

Help us Save the Night Parrot

9 August 2015

With the recent discovery of the only known population left in the world, we have a second chance to ensure the survival of this unique and remarkable species.

While little is known about the mysterious Night Parrot, no more than 100 individuals are thought to remain. That is why we must move quickly to save it.

The most immediate threat facing this highly vulnerable bird is uncontrolled feral cats prowling their habitat – being both nocturnal and ground-dwelling, the Night Parrot is vulnerable to predation.

If we are to haul it back from the brink of extinction, a recovery team must be on the ground now, implementing feral animal control as a matter of urgency. We will also need to develop a fire management plan before summer, and tackle the issue of human disturbance – the other main risk to the bird’s future.

Together, we can save the Night Parrot. Please donate urgently today.

This 9 August 2015 video from Australia is called Elusive night parrot captured for the first time in 100 years in Queensland.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

Night parrot capture and tagging hailed as ‘holy grail’ moment for bird lovers

The area of south-west Queensland where the elusive nocturnal parrot, presumed extinct, was caught is now to be protected

Oliver Milman

Monday 10 August 2015 03.26 BST

The elusive night parrot, a species thought to be extinct for about 100 years, has finally been captured and tagged by scientists as part of a pioneering project to safeguard the remaining ground-dwelling birds.

Aside from two dead parrots found over the past 25 years, the night parrot had not been captured since the 1890s and was presumed extinct by many bird experts.

But in 2013, ornithologist John Young announced that he had taken a few blurry images of the night parrot after a decade spent scouring the spinifex vegetation and caves of the Queensland outback for the bird.

Following an 18-month search for a night parrot, fellow ornithologist Steve Murphy netted one of the birds on 4 April. Feather samples were taken from the bird, and a small tracker, with a battery that lasted for 21 days, was placed on its leg to gain greater insight into the habits of the mysterious creature.

“It’s fantastic to have this bird, which is such an enigmatic creature,” said Rob Murphy, executive manager of conservation group Bush Heritage Australia. “When you talk to bird lovers, this is the holy grail. It’s like finding a thylacine.

“Before this research, we didn’t know what they ate, where they got their water from or anything. We’re really starting from ground zero with the night parrot.”

The area of south-west Queensland where the nocturnal parrot was caught is now to be protected, with the property bought and managed by Bush Heritage Australia.

The tagged bird roamed up to 8km for food each night, but remained in the same nesting site. It is unclear how many of the animals remain, and Bush Heritage is keeping the exact location of its habitat, the only known site for night parrots in Australia, a secret.

“This is such a rare bird that giving the location would attract some well meaning people but also poachers,” Murphy said. “The confidentially of the site has been the best friend to the bird.”

About 30 remote cameras have been set up to gain a better understanding of how many night parrots are in the area. However, these have so far proved less effective than sound recordings that have picked up the sounds of several birds within the prickly spinifex shrubs.

While the drought that has gripped western Queensland has reduced the number of feral cats in the area, the feline predators remain a mortal threat to the night parrot.

Bush Heritage will trial a feral cat “grooming trap” at the site to kill any cats in the area. The trap, developed by South Australian firm Ecological Horizons, contains a range of sensors that determine whether an animal passing within four metres is a cat.

If it identifies the target as a cat, the trap will spray it with a toxic gel that the cat will ingest when grooming.

See also here.

Kangaroo pouch inside video


This video says about itself:

Inside a Kangaroo Pouch – Smarter Every Day 139

31 July 2015

Do you know what the inside of a kangaroo pouch looks like? Here’s a video about exactly how I discovered the truth.

See also here.

And because you need a Friday pick-me-up, here’s a baby kangaroo cuddling a teddy bear.

Jellyfish eats fish, video


This video from Australia says about itself:

4 June 2015

A deadly Irukandji box jellyfish captures and devours a fish off Cairns despite having no defined brain.

Read more here.