Australian occupiers’ nazi flag in Afghanistan


A source of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation within the Australian Defence Department for this news claimed the flag was up for a “prolonged period”.

This Australian army in Afghanistan incident is not the only nazi incident in the occupation of Afghanistan.

In 2011, it turned out that Australian neonazi Kenneth Stewart was an Afghan occupation mercenary.

British soldiers' nazi salutes in Afghanistan

As if nazi infiltration in the United States armed forcesGolden Dawn Greek nazis present in the Greek armed forces … African-hating racist officers in the German armyCzech nazi officers in the NATO occupation forces in Afghanistan are not already more than enough; in 2013, this photo of British armed forces in Afghanistan doing the nazi salute.

So, not just in the United States armed forces, nazis (and other criminals) are welcome to help occupy Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Australian lizards scare predators with ultra-violet light


This February 2018 video from Australia says about itself:

On this episode of Breaking Trail, Coyote catches a Blue Tongue Skink! While exploring the Australian outback just outside the town of Meandarra the team stumbles upon this large snake-like lizard!

Infamous for their large blue tongue defensive display, this species is well known in pet trades around the world. Get ready to meet Australia’s favorite skink!

From ScienceDaily:

Australian lizard scares away predators with ultra-violet tongue

Researchers investigate how the blue-tongued skink uses a full-tongue display to deter attacking predators

June 7, 2018

When attacked, bluetongue skinks open their mouth suddenly and as wide as possible to reveal their conspicuously coloured tongues. This surprise action serves as their last line of defence to save themselves from becoming prey says Martin Whiting, of Macquarie University in Australia, who conceived the study just published in Springer’s journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. The research revealed that the back of the northern bluetongue skink‘s tongue is much more UV-intense and luminous than the front, and that this section is only revealed in the final stages of an imminent attack.

Bluetongued skinks of the genus Tiliqua are medium-large sized lizards widely found throughout Australia, eastern Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. They are well camouflaged but their strikingly blue tongues are distinct and are UV-reflective in species in which this has been measured. When attacked, they open their mouths wide to reveal their tongues.

The research team set out to investigate the tactics that bluetongue skinks use to ward off attackers, and focused on the largest of the bluetongue skinks, the northern bluetongue skink (Tiliqua scincoides intermedia). This omnivorous, ground-dwelling lizard of northern Australia is well camouflaged thanks to the broad brown bands across its back. However, birds, snakes, monitor lizards — all animals thought to have UV vision — are among its main predators.

First the researchers gathered information about the colour and intensity of different parts of the lizard’s tongue using a portable spectrophotometer to measure the tongues of thirteen skinks. The first exciting finding was that the blue tongue is actually a UV-blue tongue. The researchers then established that the rear of the skinks’ tongues was almost twice as bright as the tips. When a predator approached, the skinks would remain camouflaged until the very last moment, before opening their mouths widely and revealing their highly conspicuous UV-blue tongues.

The next part of the study involved simulating ‘attacks’ on these lizards using model (fake) predators. The team used a snake, a bird, a goanna (monitor lizard), a fox and a piece of wood as a control. The model predator attacks were simulated within a controlled environment.

“The lizards restrict the use of full-tongue displays to the final stages of a predation sequence when they are most at risk, and do so in concert with aggressive defensive behaviours that amplify the display, such as hissing or inflating their bodies,” explains lead author Arnaud Badiane. “This type of display might be particularly effective against aerial predators, for which an interrupted attack would not be easily resumed due to loss of inertia.”

The more intense the attack and the risk they were experiencing, the more full-tongue displays the animals were seen to use, and the greater section of their tongues they would reveal. Such displays were also most often triggered by attacking birds and foxes, rather than by snakes or monitor lizards.

“The timing of their tongue display is crucial,” adds Badiane. “If performed too early, a display may break the lizard’s camouflage and attract unwanted attention by predators and increase predation risk. If performed too late, it may not deter predators.”

Australian birds from different species help each other


This video says about itself:

Amazing footage of Western Australia’s Splendid Fairy-wren

15 October 2012

This amazing footage of singing and dancing Splendid Fairy-wrens was taken by Birds in Backyards ambassador Angus Stewart during a spring 2012 visit to Western Australia. Be an Aussie Bird friend by registering for free membership at http://birdsinbackyards.net.

From the University of Chicago Medical Center in the USA:

Birds from different species recognize each other and cooperate

Researchers show for the first time how birds from two different species recognize individuals and cooperate for mutual benefit

May 21, 2018

Summary: Scientists show how two different species of Australian fairy-wrens not only recognize individual birds from other species, but also form long-term partnerships that help them forage and defend their shared space as a group.

Cooperation among different species of birds is common. Some birds build their nests near those of larger, more aggressive species to deter predators, and flocks of mixed species forage for food and defend territories together in alliances that can last for years. In most cases, though, these partnerships are not between specific individuals of the other species — any bird from the other species will do.

But in a new study published in the journal Behavioral Ecology, scientists from the University of Chicago and University of Nebraska show how two different species of Australian fairy-wrens not only recognize individual birds from other species, but also form long-term partnerships that help them forage and defend their shared space as a group.

“Finding that these two species associate was not surprising, as mixed species flocks of birds are observed all over the world”, said Allison Johnson, PhD, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Nebraska who conducted the study as part of her dissertation research at UChicago. “But when we realized they were sharing territories with specific individuals and responding aggressively only to unknown individuals, we knew this was really unique. It completely changed our research and we knew we had to investigate it.”

Variegated fairy-wrens and splendid fairy-wrens are two small songbirds that live in Australia. The males of each species have striking, bright blue feathers that make them popular with bird watchers. Their behavior also makes them an appealing subject for biologists. Both species feed on insects, live in large family groups, and breed during the same time of year. They are also non-migratory, meaning they live in one area for their entire lives, occupying the same eucalyptus scrublands that provide plenty of bushes and trees for cover.

When these territories overlap, the two species interact with each other. They forage together, travel together, and seem to be aware of what the other species is doing. They also help each other defend their territory from rivals. Variegated fairy-wrens will defend their shared territory from both variegated and splendid outsiders; splendid fairy-wrens will do the same, while fending off unfamiliar birds from both species.

“Splendid and variegated fairy-wrens are so similar in their habitat preferences and behavior, we would expect them to act as competitors. Instead, we’ve found stable, positive relationships between individuals of the two species,” said Christina Masco, PhD, a graduate student at UChicago and a co-author on the new paper.

Many songbirds can recognize familiar members of their own species on the basis of the unique songs each bird sings. However, in this research the investigators believed this recognition occurred across species. How could they be so certain?

From 2012-2015, Johnson, Masco, and their former advisor, Stephen Pruett-Jones, PhD, associate professor of ecology and evolution at UChicago, studied these species at Brookfield Conservation Park in South Australia. The first unusual observation Johnson made was that when playing a recorded vocalization of one species, the other species would respond and fly in to investigate what was going on.

To follow up on this observation, the researchers monitored both fairy-wren species in the darkness before dawn and captured clear recordings of their signature songs. After sunrise, they broadcast the recorded songs from a speaker to simulate an intrusion by a particular bird into a group’s territory. The objective was to see how territory owners reacted to the songs of familiar and unfamiliar members of the other species.

The researchers placed a speaker about 30 meters away from a subject fairy-wren and played the songs of four different individuals: a fairy-wren that occupied the same territory (a co-resident or “friendly” bird), a fairy-wren from an adjacent territory (a neighbor), a fairy-wren from an area five or more territories away (an unknown bird), and a red-capped robin, a common species in the park that doesn’t pose a threat to the fairy-wrens (as a control group).

Both splendid and variegated fairy-wrens demonstrated the ability to recognize their co-residents’ songs despite the species difference. Socially dominant males of both species responded more aggressively to songs of neighbors and unknown birds of the other fairy-wren species than they did to friendly birds sharing their territory, or to the red-capped robin. When they heard songs from friendly birds, they didn’t respond, suggesting they didn’t see them as a threat.

By forming and keeping these associations with another species, fairy-wrens can better defend their nests from predators and their territories from rivals. There is also evidence that interacting with the other species has additional benefits besides territorial defense. While the splendid fairy-wrens didn’t change their behavior when associating with the other species, the variegated fairy-wrens spent more time foraging, were less vigilant, and had more success raising their young.

Johnson, Masco, and Pruett-Jones believe the fairy-wrens associate with the other species as a form of cooperation. By interacting with other species that share the same territory instead of working against them, these already social species create a larger group to help defend their territory and ward off intruders. In other words, if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em.

“Although our discovery that individuals of different species recognize each other was unexpected, it is likely that something similar occurs whenever species of non-migratory birds live on overlapping territories,” Pruett-Jones said. “Recognition facilitates sociality within species, and it follows that it could also facilitate associations between species.”

Australian archbishop convicted in child abuse scandal


This video about Australia says about itself:

Archbishop of Adelaide Philip Wilson found guilty of covering up child sexual abuse

21 May 2018

The most senior Catholic to be charged with concealing child sexual abuse — Adelaide’s Archbishop Philip Wilson — is found guilty by a New South Wales court, in a landmark ruling

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Australian archbishop found guilty of covering up sexual abuse

Today, 05:08

An Australian archbishop was found guilty of covering up abuse in the Catholic Church in the 1970s. Philip Wilson can be sentenced to two years in prison. He is the highest placed clergyman in the Catholic Church worldwide who has been found guilty of covering up abuse.

Wilson (67), Archbishop of Adelaide, was suspected of covering up the abuse of four boys by the priest James Fletcher in the 1970s. Wilson himself says he is innocent and has not known about the crimes.

He denied under oath last month that he learned in 1976 from two altar boys that they had been abused sexually. At that time, Wilson … was a priest-assistant. “I do not think I would forget that”, Wilson said in court. One of the victims stated that Wilson told him he was telling lies, because Fletcher was “a good guy”.

Fletcher was found guilty of nine cases of sexual abuse in 2004 and sentenced to eight years in prison. He died of a stroke in 2006 in prison.

Australian Cardinal Pell, Vatican #3, on trial for sexual assault


This video from Australia says about itself:

Cardinal George Pell ‘Exposed’ Full Story

28 July 2016

Les Tyack says he saw a naked George Pell expose himself to three young boys in the Torquay surf club changerooms in the late 1980s. Police are investigating multiple child abuse allegations levelled directly against Australia’s most senior Catholic cleric Cardinal George Pell, the ABC’s 7.30 program has revealed.

After a winged northern cardinal singing beautifully, a non-winged Australian cardinal in not so beautiful news.

From daily The Age in Australia today:

Cardinal George Pell to stand trial on historical sex assault charges

By Adam Cooper & Tom Cowie

1 May 2018 — 10:19am

George Pell will be the most senior Catholic leader to face a jury after being committed to stand trial on multiple historic sexual assault charges.

In a decision that will ring loud through the Vatican and around the religious world, Australia’s most senior Catholic and the man who a year ago oversaw management of the Vatican’s finances was on Tuesday committed to stand trial on half the charges he faced, involving multiple accusers.

However, magistrate Belinda Wallington struck out a series of serious charges at the start of her ruling, finding there was insufficient evidence for him to be convicted by a jury.

Ms Wallington committed the 76-year-old on charges against multiple complainants, involving alleged sexual offending at a swimming pool in the 1970s in Ballarat, where the accused man was then working as a priest; and at St Patrick’s Cathedral in Melbourne in 1990s, when he was the then Archbishop of Melbourne. …

But the magistrate ruled the evidence of the other accusers was credible enough to be believed by a jury, that there was no evidence they had colluded in what they told police, and that their allegations were not contaminated by media reports, most notably a television interview on the ABC’s 7.30 program. …

Cardinal Pell had his bail extended and is due to appear in the County Court on Wednesday, when a judge will set a date for his trial. …

Flanked by up to 40 police officers, Cardinal Pell had arrived at the court in a white sedan just after 9am. He wore a dark coloured suit and white shirt and clerical collar.

The police separated the cardinal’s path from the public as protesters arrived with laminated signs reading “every child deserves a safe and happy childhood”.