Dutch colonial mass murder in Sulawesi, Indonesia


This video says about itself:

Apocalypse now! Captain Westerling

8 December 2016

Raymond Pierre Paul Westerling (31 August 1919 – 26 November 1987), nicknamed the Turk, was a Dutch military officer of the KNIL (Royal Netherlands East Indies Army). He waged a massacre in Sulawesi during the Indonesian National Revolution after World War II. He was also responsible for a coup attempt against the Indonesian government in January 1950, a month after the official transfer of sovereignty. Both actions were denounced as war crimes by the Indonesian authorities.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

‘More victims of mass executions in Sulawesi in 1947′

Today, 08:52

During mass executions by Dutch soldiers in Sulawesi, more Indonesians died in 1947 than was known so far. This is the conclusion of journalist Manon van den Brekel after months of investigation in the Indonesian island. According to her, not 1,200 but 1550 Indonesians were executed by troops led by the officers Jan Vermeulen, Jan Stufkens and Berthold Rijborz.

Van den Brekel, who works for De Correspondent site and others, concludes this in a new book about Dutch actions in Indonesia in the late 1940’s. On evidence of witnesses, she found five places of mass executions about which nothing could be found in Dutch official archives. She also found a place about which “summary information” was available in the Dutch National Archives.

The executions took place between mid-January and mid-February 1947. During that same period, also the infamous [self-styled war criminal] Captain Raymond Westerling participated in “purifications” in Sulawesi, which also executed people summarily, with the agreement of the Dutch government.

These actions are also estimated to have cost hundreds of Indonesians their lives, although the executions under Westerling’s leadership have never been investigated thoroughly, as has now been done with the actions of Vermeulen, Stufkens and Rijborz.

‘Many more witnesses’

Van den Brekel says to the NOS that she was amazed at the number of villagers on Sulawesi that could recall the events. She spoke for her research with over 90 witnesses, the youngest of whom was 75 years old. “But there were more.”

NOS correspondent Michel Maas sees the new execution figure as a footnote. “The Dutch army was guilty for a lot more executions than has been admitted,” he says. Indonesia says that there were 40,000 victims just in Sulawesi.

Dutch colonial murders in Palembang, Sumatra, Indonesia: here.

90-year-old Indonesian accuses Dutch colonial army of torture


This 2008 video is called Torture prison, from Dutch colonialism in Indonesia.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Indonesian claims compensation from the Netherlands for torture

Today, 09:49

In the court in The Hague a 90-year-old Indonesian says he was tortured by Dutch soldiers in the former Dutch East Indies in 1947. He claims 50,000 euros compensation from the Dutch government.

The man named Yasman himself is not present in The Hague. The trial goes through a Skype link with a court on Java. The case was instituted by the Dutch Ereschulden Foundation.

It is the first time that an Indonesian charges the Dutch state for torture in former Dutch East Indies. The state has already paid damages for executions and rapes during the Dutch military actions there, but so far not (yet) for torture. That makes the case important, says lawyer Liesbeth Zegveld who defends Yasman.

Electrocuted

The torture is said to have occurred in 1947, in the first military campaign of the Netherlands to stop Indonesian independence.

Zegveld: “The man was in training at the Indonesian army at that time, was detained and imprisoned in a sugar factory in east Java near Kebon Agung, was tortured there, beaten with sticks on his head, cigarettes burned on his skin and he has been electrocuted. That way he has been imprisoned for thirteen months.”

Whether Yasman’s story is correct is difficult to determine because there is no evidence, Zegveld acknowledges. “That’s why it is so important for the court to hear the man. It depends very much on his statement, but his story is quite detailed, and his sister says he was gone for a long time. When he returned, he was greatly famished. May be that all is enough.”

“There is not much more available, but his story is useful in the context of the [so-called as euphemism] police actions when violence was used.” The term ‘police actions’ describes the Dutch military actions in Indonesia.

Injuries

The Dutch state acknowledged that the places where Yasman said he had been imprisoned were indeed prisons. The Red Cross has also written reports stating that in those places things happened “incorrectly”.

The purpose of today’s hearing is to hear Yasman’s story. If the court continues with the case, then, according to Zegveld, an expert will go to Indonesia to look at the man’s injuries.

He must then judge whether the dents on his skull and the burns on his skin are indeed the result of the abuse in the 1940’s.

Blonde rescued orangutan named Alba


This video from Borneo in Indonesia says about itself:

Meet Alba, the Albino Orangutan

15 May 2017

Following a global campaign to help us find a special name for the 5-year old albino orangutan, BOS Foundation is delighted to announce that this little girl is named Alba, which means ‘white’ in Latin and ‘dawn’ in Spanish. Hopefully a new dawn will come for these precious animals. The name Alba was selected from thousands of suggestions sent from around the world at name@orangutan.or.id or on social media quoting the hashtag #albinoorangutan.

A veterinarian says that in the ten days since Alba was saved from her captors, being very thin then, has already added 4.5 kilos to her weight.

Dusky scrubfowl searches for food


This video says about itself:

13 July 2016

Dusky Scrubfowl are a member of a family of birds called megapodes, meaning “large feet.” This individual is using its feet to search through the leaf litter for food such as insects and other invertebrates.

This species lives in eastern Indonesia.

‘Structural Dutch crimes in anti-Indonesian independence war’


Indonesians about to be executed by Dutch army, ANP photo

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Extreme violence in the Dutch East Indies was structural”

Today, 16:03

In the former Dutch East Indies structural mass violence was used and Dutch soldiers committed war crimes, with the political and military leadership in The Hague and Batavia [now: Jakarta] knowing that.

This is the conclusion of the new historical study The burning villages of General Spoor [De brandende kampongs van Generaal Spoor] by historian Remy Limpach, which was presented today.

Limpach consulted official archives for his research, as well as diaries, letters and memoirs. “I encountered in them thousands of cases of extreme violence. All forms of violence that you can imagine. Torture, rape, the killing of prisoners and the burning of villages.”

The governments in Batavia and The Hague, the main culprits, did not intervene. “They had started the war and approved the policy. They also had made available little resources and manpower, and that stimulated the occurrence of extreme violence.”

According to Limpach the government demanded the impossible from soldiers. “There was not enough material. Soldiers had to monitor huge areas with too few troops. That meant that the soldiers were exhausted and weary. Through grueling long patrols they got a short fuse.”

Excesses report

More than 200,000 Dutch soldiers fought between 1945 and 1950 against Indonesian independence. In 1969 Parliament had asked for a so-called Excesses Memorandum. Historian Cees Fasseur was commissioned by the government to investigate the violence in Indonesia. In the report were listed 110 cases of exceptional violence. Fasseur spoke then of “excesses” and not of war crimes.

How many soldiers were involved in extreme violence, Limpach can not say. …

The government does not rule out a new investigation into the war which the Netherlands waged in the Dutch East Indies, said Ministers Koenders (Foreign Affairs) and Hennis (Defense) after the publication of the book by Limpach.

See also here. And here. And here. And here.

Also from Dutch NOS TV today (translated):

“It’s been a lot dirtier war than we had assumed for a long time or wanted to face,” said Peter Romijn at the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies. He talks about a new publication by historian Remy Limpach.