German government sends Afghan refugees back to their deaths


This video is about Germany. Hundreds demand justice for Kunduz massacre victims in Afghanistan.

Recently, the German government Interior Minister Thomas de Maizière said that the Afghan government should stop refugees from fleeing the country.

And how, Herr de Maizière, is the Kabul government supposed to stop Afghan refugees from fleeing?

By bringing peace to the country? Apparently, in Herr de Maizière’s theory, whenever German or other NATO soldiers shoot people or drop bombs in some country, that country then is automatically at peace (in practice, however, often the peace of the grave). The Kabul government and their big NATO paymasters have proved to be extremely unable to do that for the past fifteen years and longer.

By improving the situation of Afghan women? They and their big NATO paymasters have proved to be extremely unable to do that for the past fifteen years and longer.

By stopping sexual abuse of children? United States occupation generals have said it is OK for Afghan warlords to carry on with that.

By stopping the poverty and hunger? They and their big NATO paymasters have proved to be extremely unable to do that for the past fifteen years and longer. As all the trillions of money go to warfare, to corrupt Western merchants of death and to corrupt Afghan warlords.

Then, in what other way should the Afghan government stop refugees?

Recently, in Germany extreme right racist politicians advocated violently stopping Afghan and other refugees crossing the German border. Asked if they really believed that German border guards should stop refugee women and children from crossing the border through open fields with firearms they answered ‘Yes’.

Is Herr de Maizière now advising the Afghan government that their border guards should stop refugee women and children from crossing the border out of Afghanistan through open fields by killing these refugee women and children?

By the way, only a small minority of refugees from the bloody war in Afghanistan go to Germany.

Why have millions of refugees fled Afghanistan? Partly because of war crimes there by Herr de Maiziere’s German armed forces. Like the Kunduz massacre of civilians. A massacre covered up by you, Herr de Maiziere. When you were not yet Minister of the Interior like now, but Minister of War … oops, I should have used the euphemism ‘Defence’. You, Herr de Maiziere, demonstratively promoted Colonel Klein, responsible for that bloody massacre, early in 2013 to the rank of brigadier general.

Of course, refugees from Afghanistan flee not only German war crimes. If we limit ourselves to Kunduz, where the German Bundeswehr had committed their massacre: recently, the United States Air Force, your NATO allies, Herr de Maiziere, lethally attacked the MSF hospital, the only hospital in Kunduz.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Germany sends back over 12,000 Afghans

Today, 12:16

Germany has told 12,500 Afghans in the country that they must return to their country. …

According to the Interior Ministry, the security situation in Afghanistan is such that it is safe to send people back. …

It is expected that many people will object to being returned forcibly. …

The return of asylum seekers to Afghanistan is a sensitive issue in Germany because of the constant attacks by the Taliban. This week the German consulate in Mazar-i-Sharif was targeted by an attack by the Taliban.

The party Die Linke calls on the government not to send Afghans back to their country, because there are great risks involved.

LAST MONTH WAS THE 15TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE WAR IN AFGHANISTAN David Wood examines how the Trump administration will address America’s longest war in the failing country. [David Wood, HuffPost]

At least 340 refugees drowned in four accidents involving boats travelling from Libya to Italy in the course of two days, according to official sources: here.

US Americans suspected of torture in Afghanistan


This video says about itself:

US: Ex-Detainee Describes Unreported CIA Torture

3 October 2016

A Tunisian man formerly held in secret United States Central Intelligence Agency custody have described previously unreported methods of torture that shed new light on the earliest days of the CIA program. Lotfi al-Arabi El Gherissi, 52, recounted being severely beaten with batons, threatened with an electric chair, subjected to various forms of water torture, and being chained by his arms to the ceiling of his cell for a long period.

The United States repatriated El Gherissi to Tunisia on June 15, 2015, after 13 years in custody without charges or trial. He was not provided compensation or support for his wrongful detention or the torture he endured, nor was he provided help to cope with the physical and mental harm incurred. Today he is destitute, unable to work, and experiencing the consequences of serious physical and emotional trauma he believes is a direct result of his treatment in US custody.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

International Criminal Court suspects Americans of torture of Afghan prisoners

Today, 02:53

The International Criminal Court in The Hague says the US has possibly tortured prisoners in Afghanistan. Prosecutors say that the suspicions were raised on the basis of a preliminary examination. The US military and the CIA would thus have committed war crimes.

A report states that there are indications that the military has tortured at least 61 detainees, especially in 2003 and 2004. In the same period CIA employees are said to have tortured at least 27 people in secret prisons in Afghanistan and elsewhere.

Interrogation technique

The alleged crimes, according to the report, were not the work of a few individuals. It seems that the torture was part of an approved interrogation technique with which the US hoped to get “useful information“.

Prosecutors say they will soon decide whether they are going to ask for permission to do an extensive study in Afghanistan about war crimes.

The US itself is not a member of the ICC, but US citizens can be prosecuted if they have committed crimes in a country which is a member, such as Afghanistan. The question is whether it ever will come to that. Even if sufficient evidence will be provided, the very question remains whether Washington will cooperate in prosecution of its nationals by the ICC. In the past, the US has made clear that it will not accept that American soldiers may stand trial in The Hague.

U.S. President George Bush signed into law the American Servicemembers Protection Act of 2002, intended to intimidate countries that ratify the treaty for the International Criminal Court. The law authorizes the use of military force to liberate any American or citizen of a U.S.-allied country being held by the court, which is located in The Hague. This provision, dubbed the “Hague invasion clause,” has caused a strong reaction from U.S. allies around the world, particularly in the Netherlands: here.

Some African countries which had originally recognized the ICC are now threatening to withdraw. Because in practice the ICC prosecutes only Africans; while rich suspects from rich countries, like Tony Blair from Britain, go scot-free.

Also, there are African suspects and quite other African suspects. Bashir, dictator of Sudan, was indicted by the ICC when he had a bad relationship with NATO governments. However, in 2011 Bashir became an ally in the NATO war of regime change against Libya. And now the European Union considers him an ally in stopping African refugees from dictatorship, war and famine. So, probably Bashir will never be on trial in The Hague; unless governments of rich countries will consider he is no longer useful as an ally.

One may wonder which U.S. individuals the ICC may indict now. Only privates? Or will they be a little more courageous, and indict even corporals? Or will they be really courageous, and indict people like Bush’s Secretary of War ‘Defence’ Donald Rumsfeld or Bush’s Vice President Dick Cheney?

The first American troops left for Afghanistan in 2001 …. At the height of the mission, there were 100,000 American soldiers.

President Obama has long said all US Americans would be home at the end of his term, but he said last summer that still 8,400 soldiers will remain in the country, because of the precarious security situation.

See also here.

The International Criminal Court is investigating US war crimes. But there’s a huge catch: here.

Bush’s ‘new’ Afghanistan, more and more opium


This video from the USA says about itself:

Karzai Brother on CIA Payroll

28 October 2009

The New York Times reports that the brother of Afghanistan’s President Karzai, an alleged opium smuggler and war profiteer, has been taking money from the CIA.

According to United Nations research, over 2,000 square kilometer in Afghanistan is now used for growing opium poppies.

The harvest for 2016 is estimated to be 4800 tonnes, nearly 50% more than last year.

Even though the George W Bush-imposed president of Afghanistan, Hamid Karzai, is no longer president. And though Hamid Karzai’s brother, drug kingpin Ahmed Wali Karzai, has been killed by a rival.

US air strikes kill scores of civilians in Afghanistan: here.

Bloody Afghan warlord gets United States taxpayers’ money


This video says about itself:

Hands Dripping with the Blood of the Afghan People‘: US Agrees to Pardon and Reward Warlord

24 September 2016

The peace deal amounts to a bribe for warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar to not commit crimes and terrorism, says Sonali Kolhatkar, host of “Rising Up With Sonali” on KPFA

Margaret Thatcher praised jihadists in Afghanistan


This video from the USA says about itself:

WATCH: British PM Heaps Praise On Jihadists In Afghanistan (1981)

10 September 2016

Newly published papers show that one of the country [Britain]’s top civil servants held a private summit with senior American, French and German politicians at which they decided to provide “discreet support for Afghan guerrilla resistance”.

More about this in the British (Conservative) Daily Telegraph.

So, Margaret Thatcher not only helped to sell British weapons to Saudi Arabia which are now used for killing Yemeni civilians. Ms Thatcher also helped finance violence by the self-styled mujaheddin in Afghanistan; including Osama bin Laden and what eventually became al-Qaeda and the Taliban.

Texas, USA cop-killing war veteran had PTSD


Micah Xavier Johnson

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Veteran who shot dead five policemen in Dallas had PTSD

Today, 08:24

The former soldier who last month shot dead five policemen in Dallas had symptoms suggestive of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but was not helped. This is evident from documents that the Veterans Administration has released.

After Micah Johnson in 2014 had returned from Afghanistan, he sought help for panic attacks, depression and hallucinations. Doctors then concluded that he was no danger to himself or others.

Johnson in the army was a specialist in the field of carpentry and masonry. He told doctors that he saw during the war how his fellow soldiers were torn apart by bombs. Since then, he had nightmares. He heard voices and explosions in his head.

“I was trying to block the images in my head, but it’s hard to forget something like that,” Johnson is quoted in the documents of the health care service for veterans. Doctors sent the former soldier back home and told him to have medication, but he got no further help.

On July 7, Micah Johnson shot five police officers dead during a demonstration in Dallas against racist police brutality. Police killed Johnson with a bomb robot.

Murders in Germany, wars in the Middle East


This Associated Press video says about itself:

First anniversary of deadly NATO airstrike

SHOTLIST

Char Dara district, Kunduz province – 29 August 2010

1. Mid of site where airstrike on tankers happened
FILE: Char Dara district, Kunduz province – 05 September 2009

2. Former NATO commander in Afghanistan General Stanley McChrystal visiting the site a day after strike, burnt tanker in background

3. Mid of McChrystal and other NATO officials

4. Various of destroyed tanker
Char Dara district, Kunduz province – 29 August 2010

5. Zoom out of site

6. Mid of children playing at site
Char Dara district, Kunduz province – 27 August 2010

7. Wide of locals in Char Dara district

8. House of Haji Abdul Basir, who lost three of his sons and one of his grandsons in the strike

9. Various of Basir’s family

10. SOUNDBITE (Dari) Haji Abdul Basir, father and grand father of strike victims:

“Germany is our biggest enemy; they bombed us because of the two fuel tankers. If they hadn’t done what they did we would have been ready to sell our lands and pay them the cost of the tankers.”

11. Mid of Basir’s grandchild
Kunduz city, Kunduz province – 29 August 2010

12. SOUNDBITE (Dari) Hayatullah Khan, provincial director for Afghan Human Rights Commission in Kunduz:

“From the day after the incident, the commission started its investigation on the incident. After ongoing meetings with German PRT (Provincial Reconstruction Team) in Kunduz and meeting officials from German Defence ministry, we asked them if they could help the families of the victims in a way to repent for what happened and we also asked them to make sure there will not be anymore civilian casualties in future military operations.”

Kunduz city, Kunduz province – 31 August 2010

13. Wide shot of NATO military base in Kunduz province

14. SOUNDBITE (German) Major Stephen Wessel, German military spokesman in Kunduz:

“The one who did that from a military point of view at the time, who was responsible, had his reasons to act as he had decided. I can’t say anything more than this at this point.”

15. Close of hands

16. SOUNDBITE (German) Major Stephen Wessel, German military spokesman in Kunduz:

“The German army supported financially the victims’ relatives we could research and concerning this, the compensation to the victims’ relatives is now over. There are no further intention of support from the German army’s side. Beyond that, there are some further projects to support, but the security situation here in the region doesn’t allow for it at the moment.”
Kunduz city, Kunduz province – 29 August 2010

17. Wide of police checking cars and people in Kunduz city, rifle in foreground

18. Various shots of police checking car

19. Wide of checkpoint

STORYLINE

A year after a German-ordered airstrike on two tankers in Afghanistan that is believed to have killed scores of civilians, families in Char Dara are remembering their relatives.

On 4th September 2009, German Colonel Georg Klein ordered the NATO airstrike against two tanker trucks that had been seized by Taliban insurgents near Kunduz, fearing they could be used to attack troops.

The attack in the northern Afghan province killed up to 142 people, many of them civilians.

German officials have said the Taliban may have been planning a suicide attack on the military’s base using the hijacked tankers.

A year on, 65-year old Haji Abdul Basir was embittered by the incident which took the lives of his three sons and one of his grandsons.
“Germany is our biggest enemy they bombed us because of the two fuel tankers. If they hadn’t done what they did we would have been ready to sell our lands and pay them the cost of tankers,” said Basir.

Hayatullah Khan, the provincial director of the commission added that the issue of the civilian casualties in the military operations still remains a concern for them.

By VICTOR GROSSMAN in Germany:

These tragedies are born close to home

Wednesday 27th July 2016

VICTOR GROSSMAN reports from Berlin on causes of the spate of violence striking Germany and across Europe

ONE, two, three, four — so many killing scenes in Bavaria in little over a week. And that against a backdrop of terrible, even worse killings in so many towns and cities elsewhere.

My main reaction is sorrow. Sorrow for the innocent people who only took the train, went shopping or went to a concert and then never came home. And even more sorrow for the families and friends for whom they were irreplaceable.

Among the many, many flowers, candles and toys placed at the sites of the killings one word is often repeated: “Warum?” — “Why?”

In the hunt for answers we must look first at the perpetrators of these killings. Almost all were young men whose feelings had been twisted into hatred. Some had been diagnosed as mentally ill but the others must surely have suffered too to do such terrible things.

We need not look all too far to find possible causes of such hatred or, frequently, of distorted despair. I think of what hundreds of thousands of people have gone through. War-torn home towns, shootings, explosions and bombings in their native Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, a terrifying flight to get away, to find some haven, some place where they can escape and perhaps even realise their hopes and wishes but a hellish journey to get there.

For those who reached the Promised Land, Germany, some were lucky and found some of the many warm-hearted people who welcomed and helped them.

But all too many were met with callousness, rejection, neglect and greed, even violence, and the constant threat of being sent back to ruins and poverty.

In even the best cases there were the problems of finding oneself in a strange land, with a strange language and very different customs.

This is enough to twist the minds of many people, but not least of all those of young males barred from work and dignity, from family, from women.

Yes, my sorrow extends to all of them too — and to the tragedy of young lives distorted by such experience, lacking guidance or a chance to fight back properly, often so very much alone.

I cannot absolve them of guilt. But I can find guilt elsewhere as well. How many of the good, peaceful people in Bavarian towns and cities — or in other peaceful places — know or care about the killing in the homelands of these people and who has been responsible for them?

What was the punishment for the German colonel who in 2009 ordered the bombing in Kunduz which killed up to 100 civilians? Or was it 150? Who cares, really — except their families? And they, after all, received a full $5,000 for each death. Colonel Klein, who ordered the raid, was promoted to general a few years later.

Who still cares that in 2015, also in Kunduz, 30 or 40 medical personnel or patients, some of them children, were killed by a US war plane in repeated “mistaken” bombing attacks despite immediate pleas to desist? This time relatives were paid $6,000 for each family member killed. After all, one must not disregard inflation!

How many hundreds of thousands were killed in Iraq after a war based on conscious lies? The counting has not been so accurate as in the sad Bavarian massacre. How long have US weapons and German weapons been used to kill civilians in Yemen, in Syria, in Somalia? How long have US weapons and military assistance been used in the destruction of Gaza and repression in Palestine?

Most Arab people certainly know of all these things — and do not easily forget them. How many in Bavaria are aware of them? Or in Germany? Or the US?

The “unfortunate mistakes” at wedding parties and the like are not easily forgotten by sons or brothers. Is it surprising that some seek retribution, even blind retribution? Sadly, very tragically, the ones to suffer and die from such retribution are sometimes peaceful citizens of Arnsbach, Munich or other cities, who are just as innocent of any wrongdoing as those in Kunduz or Kirkuk. And, until the shots or blasts can be heard and felt, just as uninvolved.

This means that everything must be done, wherever we are, to get as many involved as possible. Not only must we oppose the bloody attacks from the sea, ground or air, but also the shipment of the utensils of death to those areas, indeed, to any areas.

We must let the people of other countries solve their own problems — without our pressures, our interference, above all without our weapons.

My sorrow extends even further, to much of what I see in the world which leads to death thoughts, large and small scale.

I firmly believe that we must oppose the cult of killing which pervades our entire culture, the war films, the video games and the media heroics which idolise Western snipers, torturers and killers of all kinds while detailing over and over the misdeeds of a tiny number of immigrants.

But the arms industry brings in billions. Its crooked influence is related, in no small measure, to killings of all kinds, whether by a mentally ill youngster on a peaceful street in Bavaria — inspired or not inspired by Isis leaders — or committed by a handsomely uniformed and decorated general and his men, praised by their embedded journalists as heroic saviours of our civilisation.

Indeed, they and the men behind them in their skyscraper boardrooms are, directly or indirectly, the truly guilty ones, for the wars, the waves of refugees, the misery and countless personal tragedies.

Can they be removed before we all kill each other off in some final hungry desert — or in a sudden final atomic blast?