‘Stop British government recruiting child soldiers’


This October 2013 video is called Child soldiers in the British Army: one recruit’s story | Guardian Docs.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Army puts kids at risk, says rights charity

Monday 23rd May 2016

CHILDREN enlisting in the British Armed Forces are facing “significant risk and disadvantage,” a human rights campaign warned yesterday.

According to Child Soldiers International, recruits under the age of 18 were “actively sought” for more dangerous infantry roles.

In a letter to Defence Minister Penny Mordaunt, the charity urged the government to raise the minimum enlistment age to 18. At present, kids can take to the colours at 16 and apply to from 15.

The letter was co-signed by the National Union of Teachers general secretary Christine Blower and the children’s commissioners for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

LEGOS HAVE GOTTEN A LOT MORE VIOLENT “The number of Lego weapons overall has increased greatly since then. Researchers found that nearly 30 percent of all Lego sets sold today now include at least one weapon. In 1978, that figure was under 5 percent.” [HuffPost]

British cluster bombs killing Yemeni children?


This video says about itself:

Yemen: Cluster Munitions Kill and Wound Civilians

(Beirut, August 27, 2015) – Saudi Arabia-led coalition forces appear to have used cluster munition rockets in at least seven attacks in Yemen’s northwestern Hajja governorate, killing and wounding dozens of civilians, Human Rights Watch said today. The attacks were carried out between late April and mid-July 2015.

By Joana Ramiro in Britain:

Are British-made cluster bombs killing kids?

Monday 23rd May 2016

Amnesty demands full probe after bombs found in Yemen

HUMAN rights campaigners are demanding an urgent investigation into evidence that banned British-made cluster bombs may have been used to slaughter children in Yemen.

Amnesty International demanded “full government disclosure” over whether any British personnel were involved in dropping the BL-755 bombs from British-supplied Tornado jets.

The campaign called on Prime Minister David Cameron to review Britain’s alliance with Saudi Arabia, which is leading attacks on Yemen and still receives British arms licences despite an EU embargo.

Amnesty UK arms control director Oliver Sprague said: “Cluster bombs are one of the nastiest weapons in the history of warfare, rightly banned by more than 100 countries, so it’s truly shocking that British cluster munition has been dropped on a civilian area in Yemen.

“Given that this type of cluster bomb is very likely to have been used in combination with Tornado war planes which the UK has also sold to Saudi Arabia, there’s even a possibility that British support personnel might have been involved in the cluster bombing of Yemen.”

Amnesty inspectors found a partially exploded BL-755 near a farm in the Hajjah governorate. The bomb was originally manufactured in the 1970s by Bedfordshire’s Hunting Engineering Ltd.

BL-755s are banned under international law and can contain up to 147 bomblets designed to burn through tank armour, which scatter on impact but often don’t detonate until picked up.

Cluster bombs and their bomblets often take the lives of civilians unaware of their dangerous nature.

In one recent incident on March 1, an eight-year-old was killed after unwittingly playing with some discarded bomblets while herding goats with his older brother.

In the explosion, the 11-year-old brother lost three fingers and suffered severe shrapnel injuries.

He said: “We go down every day to the valley to herd goats, where there are many small bombs.

“We found four of them in the morning, they were cylindrical with a red ribbon.

“We carried them with us while herding. At around 1pm, I started to take the red string with my right hand and pull and [my brother] pulled on the other end of it and then it went off and I fell back.

“[My brother] was hurt in his stomach and he had fallen down too. We didn’t know it would hurt us.”

According to Campaign Against Arms Trade, the British government has made £2.8 billion in arms sales to the Saudi monarchy since March 2015 — when its attacks on Yemen began.

Stop the War’s Lindsey German said: “This is the latest example of Saudi Arabia’s dirty British-backed war in Yemen.

“British military advisers, British planes and British bombs are killing civilians including children there.

“We should break all links with Saudi now and stop supporting this ultra-reactionary regime.”

Ringed plover identification video


This video from Britain says about itself:

BTO Bird ID – Ringed Plovers

11 May 2016

A handsome little wader, with dapper plumage, runs along in front of you, pausing to daintily pick up morsels of food as it goes. Is this a Ringed Plover, or its less common summer-visiting cousin the Little Ringed Plover? This video workshop will guide you towards the most important differences between these two similar species to enable you to confidently tell them apart.

British government spying on citizens, documentary


This April 2016 video from Britain says about itself:

Brought to you by Scenes of Reason, The Haystack documentary is a real life investigation into 21st century surveillance in the UK and the Investigatory Powers (IP) Bill currently before Parliament.

In light of Snowden’s revelations in 2013, both privacy groups and our government agree that the laws surrounding surveillance need to be updated, but public debate and examination of the Bill have been shockingly limited on an issue that impacts us all. The Haystack explores whether the powers set out in this Bill will stop the next terrorist attack, and asks, are we willing to accept an unimaginable level of intrusion before it’s too late?

Background:

In late 2015 Scenes of Reason decided to take action and do what they do best; decode complicated topics for young millennials in order to stimulate debate. A team of four young female journalists wanted answers to both the simple and complex questions surrounding surveillance. Producer and director, Olivia Cappuccini states;

“At a time when the U.S are rolling back their surveillance powers, we need to be asking why the UK isn’t following suit, and instead pushing forward with an unprecedented Bill that is more intrusive and could seriously challenge our fundamental civil liberties in the name of national security.”

Scenes of Reason set out to present a balanced debate on the effectiveness, necessity and intent behind mass surveillance powers but found that it will never be a simple accept or deny conclusion. We interviewed a host of the biggest players in the surveillance space; ex director of GCHQ David Omand and National Security Agency whistleblower Bill Binney to name a few, and put the main arguments both for and against mass surveillance to them.

For more information, additional content, visit: thehaystackdocumentary.squarespace.com.