Conference on owls in the Netherlands

This video from Texas in the USA is called Great Horned Owl Hooting; Territorial Evening Call At Sunset.

On Saturday 10 October 2015, there will be a conference about owls, in Schouwburg Ogterop, Zuideinde 70 in Meppel town in Drenthe province in the Netherlands.

This conference will start at 9:30.

There will be lectures on about all owl species living in the Netherlands, including barn owls, little owls and eagle owls.

Romke Kleeftstra will speak about short-eared owls and common voles.

Bart Ebbinge will lecture about snowy owls in the Arctic.

Karla Bloem will tell about great horned owls in North America.

The complete program is here.

Sleepy little owl, video

This video shows a sleepy little owl in the Netherlands.

Sacha Bijkerk made this video.

Long-eared owl and blackbird, video

Karen Pelder from the Netherlands made this video in her garden.

A long-eared owl tried to sleep in a tree.

However, a blackbird did not like that and disturbed it.

Dutch birds’ nesting season 2015, video

This video shows highlights of the 2015 nesting season for birds in the Netherlands as recorded by webcams.

Including barn owls, tawny owls, peregrine falcons, kestrels, etc.

Boy watches owls on TV, real owl joins him

Western screech-owl and Marlo Sarmiento, photo credit: Marlo Sarmiento

By Arin Greenwood, Animal Welfare Editor, The Huffington Post in the USA:

Boy Watches Owls On TV, Real Owl Shows Up To Join Him

“What a hoot!”

07/31/2015 04:50 PM EDT

Marlo Sarmiento was a few minutes into watching an animated TV show about owls with his 5-year-old son Ollie the other night when he got distracted by a blur in his peripheral vision, “which then thumped into a large window.”

“I took a look and was surprised to see a tiny owl, stunned and just sitting there on the windowsill,” Sarmiento told The Huffington Post. He immediately named the bird Elfis, inspired by the name of the cartoon owl on the TV.

Sarmiento, who lives in a woodsy part of Northern California that abuts a nature preserve, pieced together that the owl had flown in through an open front door and then banged into the closed window trying to get out again.

Birds have paid the family visits before, Sarmiento says, but usually more common blue jays and robins, and usually they fly right out of the house of their own accord.

Sarmiento speculates that Elfis decided to stick around for a bit, possibly “attracted by the owl screeches coming from the TV.”

“My sister quipped that it was a good thing we weren’t watching an episode about elephants,” he says.

Sarmiento fetched a towel to carry Elfis in and help him back outside, worried the bird was shaken up and unable to find his way out. He paused briefly during the rescue to take a couple of photos so folks would believe him when he told them about his nocturnal visitor.

“Probably 4-5 minutes total visiting time,” Sarmiento says. “Didn’t even finish the show or stay for a drink/snacks!”

This was a lucky encounter in more ways than one.

“Most birds that crash into a window or wall are suffering head trauma and could be in shock. Stress from being handled could kill them,” says Damen Hurd, a wildlife rehabilitator with Wildlife Education & Rehabilitation Center in southwest Florida, who believes that Elfis is a Western screech-owl.

Hurd adds that if someone comes across an owl or other bird of prey that might be hurt, they should put the creature in a towel-lined box or dog carrier, and then get it to a wildlife rehabilitator for a checkup and any necessary treatment.

“Sometimes a bird is only stunned shortly and can be released soon after, but many die after an accident like this,” he says.

Rehabber Paula Goldberg, with City Wildlife in Washington, D.C., says that the Sarmientos are fortunate not to have gotten hurt.

“Although the little guy is as cute as a Steiff stuffed animal, it has talons, and when they latch, they don’t let go,” Goldberg says. “What an incredible moment and it is so nice to see someone else’s kids zoned out while watching TV seated next to an owl.  What a hoot!”

Sarmiento says his son has been demanding that the owl cartoon be played over and over again in the days since Elfis first dropped by.

As yet, Elfis has not flown back into their lives. Given all the risks, it’s probably for the the best that their feathered friend seems to have turned out to be more of a feathered acquaintance. But, still, if the family’s learned anything by now, it’s that you never know whoooo-whoooo might drop by.

“I am leaving the sliding back doors open just in case,” says Sarmiento.

Young long-eared owl in tree, video

This video shows a young long-eared owl in a tree in an allotment complex in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

George VanLente made the video.

Baby owl in Colorado, USA

This video from Colorado in the USA says about itself:

Boulder County Sheriff’s Deputies meet their feathery match!

Our Sheriff’s Office deputies were driving near a campground on July 23 [2015] when they were stopped in their tracks by this young Northern Saw Whet Owl. After some curious head twisting (on both sides) it safely flew away. Watch the deputy have a conversation with the baby owl as it clicks back to her.

See also here.