Barn owl defends her young against snake


This video from the USA says about itself:

Barn Owl Attacks Snake Entering Nest Box. May 6, 2015

Watch this incredible footage of Dottie the female Texas Barn Owl defending her young against a Texas Rat Snake that attempted to enter the nest box.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA about this:

Earlier this month, we witnessed a reminder that the Texas Barn Owls aren’t the only ones hunting for food during the night. Despite extensive predator guards installed around the owls’ box, a Texas rat snake gained access to the rafters. Our cameras captured the ensuing showdown as the snake approached the nest box entrance. Despite the midnight darkness, Dottie (the female owl) evicted the snake from the box, then, moments later, gathered her nestlings back to safety beneath her. Watch video [above].

It’s not just other predators that make raising a family of Barn Owls tough. The breeding ecology of Barn Owls can be boom-or-bust. They can be prolific breeders, often laying six or more eggs during a single breeding attempt, but if there’s not enough prey to support all of the nestlings, many can perish. One 16-year study in Utah found that, on average, only 63 percent of eggs hatched and 87 percent of hatchlings survived to fledging. This year, only 5 of 6 eggs hatched in the Texas Barn Owl nest and the youngest owlet (hatched nearly 11 days after the oldest) did not survive. The four remaining owlets appear healthy and well, and we are hopeful that they will survive to fledge. Watch cam.

Young barred owls leaving nest in the USA


This is a video series about the Wild Birds Unlimited Barred Owl nest cam in the USA.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

May 22, 2015

It’s almost time!

The young Barred Owls are nearing the moment when they will begin to explore the world outside their nest box. Rather than fledging right away, most owls go through a process called “branching,” where they spend days or even weeks clambering around the branches near the nest, making short flights, and completing their development.

The largest owlet featured on the Wild Birds Unlimited Barred Owl cam has already been perching at the entrance to the box (watch highlight). We’re also excited that a new camera positioned outside the box enables you to see the transition from within the box to the green forest beyond (click on “View 2nd Camera Angle” below the video screen). Be sure to tune in! Watch cam.

Great horned owls, red-tailed hawks, new study


This video from the USA says about itself:

Great Horned Owl Hooting Territorial Evening Call At Sunset

31 December 2012

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) calling for it’s mate on Dixon Branch of White Rock Creek in Dallas, Texas. This particular owl was hooting a territorial call for another owl that can be faintly heard some distance away beginning after the call around the 1:50 mark. The owls call to each other in a duet before finding each other for night hunting and nest building.

Found from the Arctic to the tropical rainforest, from the desert to suburban backyards, the Great Horned Owl is one of the most widespread and common owls in North America. Capable of killing prey larger than themselves, the Great Horned Owl is one of the larger winged predators in the United States.

Often heard but rarely seen the birds are very difficult to photograph since they are nocturnal. This video was shot using Canon Magic Lantern software which allows for extreme low light photography. It was also filmed at a considerable distance giving the owl plenty of space to act naturally. The bird was a couple hundred feet from the camera. It’s important to keep a code of ethics when around large predators such as this. They need a wide berth to not be stressed.

From Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science in the USA:

Landscape Differences around Nests of Great Horned Owls and Red-Tailed Hawks

William Langley

Butler Community College, El Dorado, Kansas

Nesting territories of great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) frequently overlap, with the owls using nests of other raptors. Records of use over a 22-year period in one locality were used to distinguish nesting sites used exclusively by great horned owls, exclusively by red-tailed hawks, and those used by both.

To determine the occurrence of various landscape characteristics within the proximity of a nest structure, I measured the total area of various land use types, total perimeter length, and the size of patches across six different land use types i.e., agriculture, pasture, residential, tree, pond, and roadside within circular plots around nests used by breeding pairs.

The landscape features surrounding nests of great horned owls differed from those surrounding red-tailed hawk nests in total perimeter length and size of patch. These differences are consistent with the fact that great horned owls hunt from perches primarily at night using sensory modalities different than diurnal hunting red-tailed hawks.

Eagle owl inspires song, tattoos


This February 2015 music video is by B3/Henk & de Halve Liters from Purmerend town, in the Netherlands.

The subject of the song is an Eurasian eagle owl. Originally a captive bird, it escaped to Purmerend. As it used to think of humans as beings feeding it, it often flew towards them. This scared many people.

The eagle owl became a subject in national and international media.

After Eurasian eagle owl-inspired cookies and cakes at a bakery in Purmerend, BirdLife in the Netherlands made eagle owl umbrellas for sale.

Henry Blekemolen, singer of B3/Henk & de Halve Liters promised that if his eagle owl song would be listened to over 10,000 times at SoundCloud and YouTube, then he would have an eagle owl tattoo on his leg.

Many people listened to the song, so now Henry Blekemolen has this tattoo.

Eagle owl tattoo, photo by Henry Blekemolen

Meanwhile, another Purmerend man has another eagle owl tattoo.

Wood ducks visit Texas barn owls


This video from the USA says about itself:

Early in the morning of April 20, 2015, a pair of Wood Ducks investigated the Texas Barn Owls‘ box. The female owl responded with a series of aggressive reactions that resulted in the ducks departing.

Little owls video


This video shows a little owl in the Netherlands, calling to its partner.

Erik Veldkamp made the video.

Barn owls on Texel island


In this 2013 video, a male barn owl brings a shrew to his partner in a nest box on Texel island.

Translated from Ecomare museum on Texel in the Netherlands today:

In 2009, 1820 barn owl couples were counted in the Netherlands, of which two on Texel. Barn owls like to eat common voles. This vole species is not present on the island. But since 2006 there are greater white-toothed shrews and barn owls think they are tasty as well. In 2014 there were 16 breeding pairs on the island, and 53 young owls hatched. Now 70 nesting boxes hang scattered across the island.