Sandra Bland, other African American women, and police


This video from the USA says about itself:

Reader Request: #SayHerName

1 June 2015

The following is an excerpt from the article, ‘Say Her Name’ Turns Spotlight on Black Women and Girls Killed by Police.’

‘“Black lives matter.” For the past nine months, this rallying cry has permeated street corners, protests, tweets, news conferences, and even the cover of Time magazine.

Last August, the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown by a Ferguson, Missouri, police officer kick-started the efforts of activists protesting against police brutality and violence. By now, the names Eric Garner, Mike Brown, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray have become synonymous with the Black Lives Matter movement. But solely focusing on their stories has come at the expense of another group affected by police violence: black women.

[It was co-founded by three black activists: Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi.]

Rachel Gilmer, associate director of the African American Policy Forum, says the reason black women’s stories are excluded from the discussion is simple.

“Across the board, all the way up from the White House’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative down to the grassroots movements that we’ve seen rise in this country in response to state violence, men and boys are seen as the primary target of racial injustice,” she says. “This has led to the idea that women and girls of color are not doing as bad, or that we’re not at risk at all.”

African American women are three times more likely to be incarcerated than their white counterparts, and young black girls are suspended from school at six times the rate of their white female peers.

Indeed, in light of the challenges black women and girls face, the AAPF recently coauthored a policy brief and launched a social media campaign titled “Say Her Name.” The effort aims to amplify the stories of African American women and girls who have been victims of police violence.

“We wanted to launch ‘Say Her Name’ to really uplift the lives and experiences of those who have been killed by police and the many other forms of police violence black women experience,” Gilmer explains, noting that officer-involved sexual assault often garners little response.

On Thursday, thousands of protesters took to the streets across the nation to amplify the names of black female victims of state violence. In San Francisco, a group of topless black women took the streets to demand justice for slain black women. In New York City, thousands flooded the streets to uplift women such as Rekia Boyd, Shelly Frey, Yvette Smith, Mya Hall, Kendra James, Natasha McKenna, and Aiyana Stanley-Jones, who was just seven when she was killed by police.

The AAPF report noted that the controversial stop-and-frisk policing tactic, which is used by law enforcement officers across the nation, tends to be associated with males of color. However, in New York City, where the policy has been deemed unconstitutional because it unfairly profiles blacks and Latinos, 53.4 percent of all of women stopped by NYPD officers were black, and 27.5 percent were Latino. The numbers of black women accosted by law enforcement is on par with their black male counterparts, yet women are often absent from the discussion about police overreach.

These demonstrations are meant to address the violence against Black women and reinforce an often forgotten truth: Black women’s bodies are NOT for consumption or commodification.’

Thanks for watching.

By Terrell Jermaine Starr, AlterNet in the USA:

These 8 stats reveal just how badly the police state hurts black women

31 July 2015 at 23:34 ET

The outrageous shooting death of Sam Dubose by a Cincinnati cop is grabbing the headlines, but nearly two weeks after Sandra Bland died in a Texas jail after being stopped and brutally arrested for a minor traffic violation, her questionable detainment makes it clear that the criminal justice system is often as brutal to black women as it is to black men. As AlterNet recently reported, Texas State Trooper Brian Encinia overstepped his authority when he asked Bland to put out her cigarette, prolonging and escalating the stop.

Social media reactions to Bland’s stop, however, have been divided, in part along racial lines. Many white people have argued that Bland would have left the stop untouched had she simply not given Texas state trooper Brian Encinia an “attitude.” Black people, overwhelmingly, have pointed out that white women regularly engage police officers just as Bland did, yet don’t have to fear being abused for doing so.

Critics point to a New York Daily News photo of a white woman breast-to-chest with an NYPD officer and a video of a white woman defiantly challenging an officer during a traffic stop as offering sharp contrasts with Bland’s treatment, and anecdotal examples of how law enforcement treats white and black women differently.

Julia Jordan-Zachery, a professor of political science at Providence College whose research focuses on the treatment of black women in the criminal justice system, says Bland’s story and ultimate death is another example of the myth of the strong black woman, who somehow is impervious to pain.

“It wasn’t possible for anyone to understand that she could have been in pain,” Jordan-Zachery told AlterNet. “What we know from literature is that black women are somehow so strong that we can’t even experience physical pain or that our tolerance level for pain is so high that no one ever listens to black women when we say we are experiencing pain.”

Breea C. Willingham, assistant professor of criminal justice at State University of New York in Plattsburg, echoed Jordan-Zachery’s analysis, saying that the disregard for black women’s bodies by American law enforcement dates back to America’s inception.

“From slavery days, during the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of black women in America, black women’s bodies were never really their own,” Willingham, who is currently working on a book that addresses the treatment of black women in prison, told AlterNet. “We’re always under surveillance. If you take the case of 15-year-old Dejerria Becton, in McKinney, Tex., where the cop slammed her on the ground in her bikini, knee in the back of her head, that’s just one example of the fact that there is no regard for our bodies.”

A major barrier in understanding the ways in which the criminal justice system treats black women is the dearth of research on the subject. While statistics on how law enforcement engage black men are plentiful, similar data on black women is limited. But Bland’s death has sparked a rare national conversation that’s forcing the country to take a closer look at how law enforcement and the criminal justice system treat black women.

AlterNet was able to find eight statistically-backed ways in which law enforcement disproportionately abuses black women, despite limited scholarly research devoted to the issue.

Below are some of the most glaring findings, along with some commentary from Willingham and Jordan-Zachery.

1. Black women make up 6 percent of San Francisco’s population, yet made up 45.5 percent of all women arrested there in 2013.

San Francisco is known as perhaps the most liberal and inclusive city in all of America, but that reputation means little for the black women its police department places in handcuffs. According to the Center for Juvenile and Criminal Justice, black women have been arrested at higher rates than other races of women in the city for the last 23 years at least. In every major arrest category, including possession, prostitution, weapons, drug felonies and marijuana, black women far outpace other races of women. Perhaps the most notable arrest disparity cited in the report is that arrest rates of black women in San Francisco are four times higher than the rest of California.

2. In New York City and Boston schools districts, black girls are suspended and expelled at much higher rates than white girls.

During the 2011-2012 school year, 90 percent of all girls suspended were black, according to a recent report titled, “Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected.”  Not one white girl was suspended that year. Boston was no better. Sixty-three percent of the girls subjected to expulsion were black during the same time frame, but no white girls were suspended.

“As public concern mounts for the needs of men and boys of color through initiatives like the White House’s My Brother’s Keeper, we must challenge the assumption that the lives of girls and women—who are often left out of the national conversation—are not also at risk,” Kimberlé Crenshaw, the study’s lead author, said.

3. Black women were locked up in state and federal prisons at more than twice the rate of white women.

Overall, black women make up 30 percent of the prison population, despite being 14 percent of the U.S. population, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. There are a wide range of reasons why these disparities exists. A Huffington Post article cites a lack of economic resources, familial support, and systematic oppression as driving actors.

It is difficult to unpack that 30 percent figure because not much research is devoted to understanding black women and incarceration, and policymakers feel no pressure to allocate resources to understanding the issue. Jordan-Zachery says this is due to the either-or politics policymakers engage in. Under this model, they can only address the issues of black men or black women, with women normally being left out.

“We can either talk about black men under the umbrella of black politics, or we can talk about black women,” she said. “We can’t talk about both simultaneously. What I suggest is that it is not a politics of either or. It’s a politics of both and. We have to expand our understanding of politics in a way that sometimes go against the American understanding of politicians that leads us to make false choices. When we include black women, what we’re actually doing is expanding our politics.”

4. Black mothers in New Jersey are more likely than their white counterparts to be deemed “unfit parents.”

New Jersey Public Radio learned through its own investigation that the children of black mothers are four times more likely to be placed in foster care than the children of white mothers. Black children make up just 14 percent of the state population but account for 41 percent of those entering foster care. The report found that even if the mothers are at similar economic levels, the black mothers were still viewed as more unfit that white moms, so this is not a class issue.

Oronde Miller, of the Alliance for Racial Equity in Child Welfare, cited a Texas analysis of unfit parents that reveals poverty was not at play when that state found more black moms unfit than white moms. Instead, he argued that authorities were racially biased in determining who was deemed a good or bad parent.

Nationally, pregnant black women are ten times more likely to be reported to child welfare services for drug use than white women, according to the Drug Policy Alliance.

Jordan-Zachery says this data should inform us on how society views black motherhood.

“Even when we’re seen, we’re seen in a very negative way to justify punishment,” she said. “So, no matter what black women do, we become criminal elements.”

Laura Browder, a Texas mom who had to take her children with her to a child interview at a mall, was arrested for child endangerment a few weeks ago. This despite the fact that her children were a mere 30 feet away from her. We can only wonder if she would have been taken into custody for the same thing if she was white.

“Here’s a woman following the so-called rules, to use policymakers’ language,” Jordan-Zachery said. “But in that case, she is still seen as a criminal. What makes her criminal? What makes her criminal in this case is poverty and a lack of child care. This is another element of invisibility. What are you supposed to do? If you leave your children at home, you become a criminal. If you take your children with you, you become a criminal. So, what are black women suppose to do? Not work? If we don’t work, then we become the stereotype.”

5. Dark-skinned black women receive stiffer prison sentences in North Carolina than light-skinned black women for comparable crimes.

In a study titled “The Impact of Light Skin on Prison Time for Black Female Offenders,” researchers found that black women who were perceived to be lighter skinned received sentences that were 12 percent lower than darker skinned women.

The authors of the study researched the criminal records of black women imprisoned in the state of North Carolina between 1995 and 2009 and controlled factors such as misconduct in prison, prior records and conviction dates. What the findings reveal, the authors wrote, is that associations with whiteness play a crucial role in how black women are treated in the criminal justice system.

6. States that drug test pregnant women disproportionately jail black women.

At least 17 states consider drug use during pregnancy to be child abuse, according to Guttmacher Institute. Pregnant black women are no more likely to use drugs than white women during pregnancy, but they are reported to child welfare services for drug use at rates higher than white pregnant moms, according to a 2015 report by the Drug Policy Alliance.

The ACLU reports that the incarceration rate for black women for drug-related offenses since 1986 has increased by 800 percent, compared to 400 percent for other races of women. It is crucial to note that black and white women uses drugs at the same rate.

7. More than half of all of women stopped by the NYPD are black.

In 2013, the most recent year from which arrest data is available, black women made up 53.4 percent of all arrests in New York City. Latina women were second at 27.5 percent and white women made up only 13.4 percent.

8. Black girls make up 14 percent of the U.S. population but make up more than 33 percent of girls detained or committed at juvenile justice system.

Willingham, whose research focuses on the incarceration of black women, says we see a higher rate of black girls behind bars than white girls because they aren’t getting the same support at the juvenile level. A recent report that analyzed how the sexual abuse girls experience can lead to incarceration points out that black girls make up a third of female juveniles detained or committed. Most girls in the juvenile justice system have experienced some form of sexual assault at some point during their lives. However, Willingham says black girls are less likely than white girls to get the rehabilitative support needed to decrease their chances of recidivism.

“Even at a young age, they’re considered ‘bad,’” she said. “For white girls, it’s, ‘Oh, they just have problems, they’ll be OK. We can help them. But black girls, no. They’re just bad.’ And we don’t even get the benefit of the doubt.”

Hopefully, attention to how black women are treated by police and the criminal justice system will change that.

The only reason Americans are beginning to hear about the abuses black women experience at the hand of law enforcement is because of social media, Willingham says. In order to gather a more complete  understanding of how police brutality and incarceration impacts black women, more research has to be done. But the recent deaths of Sandra Bland, Kendra and, as of Sunday, Ralkina Jones, all symbolize that black women face many of the same kinds of law enforcement abuse as black men.

“Whether they’re slamming us to the ground or manhandling us, throwing us in jail and finding our dead bodies in them, there is no regard for us,” Willingham said. “It’s just like throwing the trash out. That is how I see the criminal justice system treats black women. It’s just taking the trash out.”

Bland Case, Other Jail Deaths Show Black Women Also Fear Police Violence: here.

Sandra Bland Driving While Black tells the UGLY story of how Black People Are Targeted: here.

Sandra Bland Protests In Minneapolis: ‘Black Lives Matter’ Demonstrators Take To The Streets: here.

The University of Cincinnati put police officers Phillip Kidd and David Lindenschmidt on paid administrative leave Thursday for the course of an internal investigation into their reports of the July 19 killing of Samuel DuBose by officer Ray Tensing. The family of DuBose has demanded that Kidd be charged for making false statements on a police incident report, claiming that he saw DuBose’s car dragging Tensing. This came after the release of the two officers’ body camera footage, in which they can be heard corroborating Tensing’s false claim that he only shot DuBose after being dragged by his car: here.

‘Feminist’ London museum revealed as Jack the Ripper sensationalism


This video from England is called East London Women Singing in Xhosa.

By Joana Ramiro in Britain:

Women’s Museum actually the Ripper

Thursday 30th July 2015

Celebration of East End women replaced with murderer

THE hoardings were removed from a museum meant to honour the women of London’s East End yesterday to reveal a gimmicky exhibition about Jack the Ripper and his misogynistic murders.

Women’s rights campaigners and local residents were up in arms as they found out about the “crass and ill thought-out” project about to open on historic Cable Street.

The founder of the Jack the Ripper Museum, Global Diversity List chief executive Mark Palmer-Edgecumbe, said the venue was a “serious examination” of the serial killer.

The museum will “tell the story from the perspective of the women who were his victims for the first time,” his statement claimed.

The owners originally applied to Tower Hamlets Council to convert the disused shop into a “Museum of Women’s History [that] will retell the history of the East End through the eyes, voices and experiences of the women that shaped [it].”

The application even criticised most history of the area being “told from the perspective of poverty, crime and social unrest.”

The original Women's Museum application

It was backed by sample exhibits with pictures of Suffragettes, anti-racism campaigns and female trade unionists.

Campaigner Jemima Broadbridge told the Star she raised the alarm after one of her friends living on Cable Street told her about his shock as the site’s scaffolding came down.

She said Mr Palmer-Edgecombe had “cynically” suggested a popular theme for the site in order to dodge opposition.

“It doesn’t look good, it’s unfeeling and crass and ill thought-out,” Ms Broadbridge said.

The English Collective of Prostitutes complained that the museum would trivialise violence against sex workers.

Collective member Alia said: “The murder of women shouldn’t be fetishised into an intriguing murder mystery.”

The museum tried to placate complaints by arguing it would donate “a proportion of our profits” to women’s charity Eaves.

Eaves said it had not known about the museum or heard of its plans to make the charity a beneficiary.

Tower Hamlets Council said it had granted planing permission in October 2014 on the basis that the premises would be used as a women’s museum but “ultimately has no control in planning terms of the nature of the museum.”

A spokesman said the council was investigating whether any unauthorised works had been carried out.

Protesters plan to target the museum on August 5.

Announcement of protest against Jack the Ripper Museum

See also here. And here.

More photos included in the Women's Museum application

From daily The Independent in Britain about this:

Community campaigner Jemima Broadbridge told the East London Advertiser that she felt “offended by this museum of the macabre”.

“Cable Street had nothing to do with Jack the Ripper—that was in Whitechapel, not here. It’s misleading to tourists,” she said.

She told the newspaper that the street had “a glorious history about resisting Mosley’s fascists in 1936” which the community did not want “muddled up by Ripper mythology”.

Bloody glass, sold at Jack the Ripper Museum

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

Jemima Broadbridge, an east London campaigner and community organiser, said that local residents were not told about the change. “We haven’t had anything through our doors,” she said. “Fair enough he’s a businessman, but we object to him not being honest with the council and residents. Don’t pretend to build a museum about women – and this is a prime area for that, we have a lot of philanthropists around here – and then choose to do this.”

She added that Cable Street was “known for Oscar Wilde and Charles Dickens, not Jack the Ripper”.

East End women

British secret police’s sexual spying on women activists


This video from Britain says about itself:

UK ‘Special Demonstrations Squad’ Undercover Police Used Identities of Dead Children For 30 Years

4 February 2013

The ‘Special Demonstrations Squad‘ are reported to have been undercover police officers who infiltrated protest groups from the late 1960’s to the mid 1990’s- and it is claimed by Scotland Yard that the Squad had now ‘disbanded’.

By Conrad Landin in Britain:

Deceived partner speaks of secret officer’s treachery

Wednesday 29th July 2015

IT WAS 10 years after Alison’s long-term partner disappeared that she was able to convince more than a few friends that he was an undercover police officer.

She believed he was Mark Cassidy, a joiner from Birkenhead who headed out at 6.30am each morning to work on building sites during the five years they lived together, from 1995 to 2000.

He was active in construction union Ucatt and an ally in the left-wing causes she committed her spare time to.

In 2013, he was revealed as Special Demonstration Squad agent Mark Jenner — but when Alison asked police to see her file, she received the all too familiar “neither confirm nor deny” (NCND) response.

As she left the Royal Courts of Justice yesterday, I asked Alison whether she had any hope that the inquiry would force the police to reveal more information.

“I just don’t know,” she said. “Some public inquiries have made significant progress, and some have just been a whitewash.

“But, throughout all of our legal battles, there’s been overwhelming evidence that these people are who we say they are.”

Mr Jenner is in scores of Alison’s family photos and attended relationship counselling with her to discuss his reluctance to have children. It turned out that he already had three — with his wife.

Now with children of her own, Alison is more keen than ever to break the Met’s continued stonewalling.

She welcomed Lord Justice Pitchford’s specific references to activists being targeted for their political allegiances and the effect on their personal lives.

“But when you’ve had the experience I’ve had, you become very cynical about the state’s functions,” she added.

Donald Trump’s lawyer defends marital rape


This CNN video from the USA says about itself:

Trump adviser Michael Cohen: ‘You cannot rape your spouse‘.

28 July 2015

Michael Cohen, an adviser to Donald Trump, is under fire for comments he made while speaking with a reporter from the Daily Beast.

From daily The Guardian in Britain:

Donald Trump‘s lawyer threatens reporter over ex-wife’s allegations: ‘You cannot rape your spouse’

Campaign spokesman and attorney responds to resurfaced assertions of Ivana Trump ‘rape’ with vulgar tirade that political watcher says could undermine lead

Ben Jacobs in Washington

Tuesday 28 July 2015 07.32 BST

A lawyer and spokesman for current Republican presidential frontrunner Donald Trump issued a series of vulgar threats to a reporter on Monday, while falsely claiming that it was legal for a husband to rape his wife in New York.

Michael Cohen, special counsel for the Trump Organization, threatened Canadian-American reporter Tim Mak of the Daily Beast with untold legal consequences in response to an article that resurfaced allegations that Trump had raped his then-wife Ivana.

The statements from the real-estate tycoon’s long-time attorney may, campaign watchers said, prove to undermine a campaign that officially began with Trump’s incendiary remarks about migrants from Mexico whom he called “rapists” and has survived a series of increasingly controversial remarks over the following six weeks.

The Daily Beast story repeated details of a deposition relayed by a Trump biographer, who described the mogul as forcing himself on his then-wife as revenge for her encouraging him to undergo a painful and unsuccessful scalp reduction surgery in the late 1980s.

The 1993 book, by author Harry Hurt III, includes a statement from Ivana Trump stating that she referred to the sexual encounter in question “as a ‘rape’, but I do not want my words to be interpreted in a literal or criminal sense”. Donald Trump has long insisted that the assertion of assault was “false”.

But Cohen, Trump’s lawyer and a spokesman who has helped control his candidate’s message in maintaining the Republican poll lead over more experienced politicians, went much further than that. According to the Daily Beast, he issued a series of vulgar quotes when questioned by its reporter.

“I will make sure that you and I meet one day while we’re in the courthouse. And I will take you for every penny you still don’t have. And I will come after your Daily Beast and everybody else that you possibly know,” Cohen told the website. “So I’m warning you, tread very fucking lightly, because what I’m going to do to you is going to be fucking disgusting. You understand me?”

The attorney then went on to issue direct threats regarding the resurfaced assertions: “You write a story that has Mr. Trump’s name in it, with the word ‘rape’, and I’m going to mess your life up … for as long as you’re on this frickin’ planet.”

“[Y]ou’re going to have judgments against you, so much money, you’ll never know how to get out from underneath it,” Cohen told the Daily Beast.

But the lawyer’s most specious claim in the vociferous interview arrived in a false assertion about the law: “You’re talking about the front-runner for the GOP, presidential candidate, as well as private individual who never raped anybody. And, of course, understand that by the very definition, you can’t rape your spouse,” he said.

“It is true,” Cohen told the Daily Beast. “You cannot rape your spouse. And there’s very clear case law.”

Marital rape was made illegal in all US states in 1993. It was made illegal in New York state in 1984, five years before the alleged incident. Donald and Ivana Trump settled their divorce in 1992.

Despite Trump’s penchant for controversial comments – including disparaging the heroism of Arizona senator John McCain during the Vietnam war, which led to widespread condemnation within his party – Trump has maintained a substantial lead in national polls for the Republican presidential nomination.

Rick Wilson, a prominent Republican consultant, said the lawyer’s comments – just the latest party line from a man described as “Trump’s pit bull” – represented a campaign that was parroting his hyperbole.

“The Trump circus is largely comprised of hangers-on with a key skill set: kissing Donald Trump’s ass,” Wilson told the Guardian. “Oddly, the same skill set doesn’t extend into other domains like politics, common sense or judgment.”

Cohen, Ivana Trump and the Trump campaign did not respond to request for comment from the Guardian.

In an interview on Fox News that aired after the Daily Beast report surfaced, Trump continued to talk about undocumented migrants and how current president Barack Obama was “the worst”.

“Congratulations on your good poll numbers,” Fox personality Sean Hannity said.

NATO kills Afghan women, 2011


This June 2012 video is called Women, children killed in NATO wedding strike – Afghans say.

November 2011: BNAS news agency from Afghanistan reports that ISAF soldiers of NATO have fired a mortar shell at a residential house in Nalgham village. The shell killed three women in the house and killed two.

The BBC reports that during one of the infamous NATO night raids in Afghanistan, foreign troops killed two Afghan policemen and wounded two Kabul government army soldiers.

Tunisian airline stops flights to Tripoli, Libya, in November 2011


This video says about itself:

Inside Story – The dangers facing female migrants in Libya

11 May 2015

In a report titled Libya Is Full of Cruelty, the rights group Amnesty International details the conditions for women in the war-torn North African country. Amnesty says they are constantly subjected to the added danger of sexual violence. Traffickers sexually abuse female migrants as they make their desperate and treacherous journey towards Europe.

Presenter: Richelle Carey Guests: Magda Mughrabi, Libya researcher for Amnesty International and author of the report. Soraya Chemaly, writer and media critic whose work is focused on sexualised violence. Anna Zobnina, chair of the European Network of Migrant Women.

November 2011: According to Tunisia Live, Tunisian airline Tunisair has stopped flying to Tripoli, Libya; as at that airport, 300 armed men had attacked one of its aircraft.

Libyan Amazigh demonstrate in Tripoli for second time in three days against exclusion from the new government: here.

Libyan women rally for rape victim support: here.

Tunisian ex-dictator Ben Ali’s Western friends: here.