Did Berlusconi murder witness of his underage sex?


Imane Fadil at the courthouse in 2012, AFP photo

From ANSA news agency in Italy:

Ruby witness Imane Fadil dies

Murder probe opened

Milan, March 15 – A Moroccan-origin model who was a key prosecution witness in the ‘Ruby’ underage prostitute trials involving ex-premier Silvio Berlusconi has died after claiming to have been poisoned.

A murder probe has been opened, police said.

They said she had died after a “month of agony”.

She was awake until the end despite progressive organ failure. Imane Fadil, 34, died March 1 at the Humanitas Clinic at Rozzano near Milan where she had been admitted at the end of January.

She told her relatives and lawyer that she was afraid she had been poisoned.

Berlusconi was cleared of paying for sex with an underage prostitute

on appeal, after having been convicted in another court earlier

after judges said he did not know Ruby was a minor.

He has since been embroiled in cases of allegedly bribing witnesses to lie about the real nature of his bunga bunga sex parties.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

Italian media report that a mixture of radioactive substances has been found in Fadil’s blood. …

According to the Italian press, Fadil was working on a book about her experiences at Berlusconi’s controversial parties. The public prosecutor is said to have a copy of the manuscript.

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Protest against Rupert Murdoch’s racism, sexism


This 13 March 2019 video from the USA says about itself:

Protesters STORM Fox News

Rebel HQ’s Emma Vigeland reports from the #DropFox protests outside of Fox News‘ headquarters, where demonstrators demanded that companies pull their advertisements from Tucker Carlson‘s program in the wake of his unearthed sexist, racist and xenophobic comments. Protestors also were angered by Jeanine Pirro‘s Islamophobic comments about Rep. Ilhan Omar.

Samantha Bee delivers a comprehensive takedown of “white supremacist” Tucker Carlson.

These are the types of Islamophobia Fox News is OK with.

Sudanese women flogged for demonstrating for democracy


This 1 February 2019 British Channel 4 TV video says about itself:

The women on the frontline of the protests in Sudan

Yousra Elbagir reports on the women on the frontline of the protests in Sudan, who describe their experience at the hands of government forces. You may find some of the images in her report distressing.

The dictatorship in Sudan is one of the favourite dictatorships of NATO countries’ governments. Because they helped NATO in the war on Libya. Because they help the European Union to stop refugees. Because they help the Donald Trump-Saudi crown princeGerman war profiteersBritish war profiteersFrench war profiteersSpanish war profiteers war on the people of Yemen, by sending Sudanese child soldiers.

That is why the governments of NATO countries like Belgium or the Netherlands deport refugees to Sudan to be tortured.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV, 9 February 2019:

In Sudan, nine women were sentenced to twenty lashes and one month in jail after being arrested at a demonstration. According to the judge, they were guilty of incitement.

The conviction comes a day after Sudanese President Bashir had released all women arrested earlier. He announced this on International Women’s Day

According to them [demonstrator sources], the release was enforced by the female doctor Ghada Samir, who was beaten the day before yesterday at a demonstration and was also sentenced to lashes.

According to the demonstrators, the security services had found out that she had a US American passport, and then wanted to let her go. She is said to have refused that. She would then have threatened to go on hunger strike if not all women would be released. To that threat, Bashir was sensitive, the demonstrators say.

The president declared a state of emergency last month, after which the protests in his country continued to swell.

Yesterday hundreds of people also took to the streets in the cities of Khartoum and Omdurman.

According to a spokesperson for the demonstrators, who are part of a big trade union, more than 800 people have been tried in the emergency courts that Bashir has set up with the introduction of the state of emergency.

Big Women’s March in Amsterdam today


This 9 March 2019 video from the Netherlands says about itself (translated):

Start of the Women’s March Amsterdam 2019 on the Dam square. The march to the Museumplein square is a big demonstration to get better rights for women and minorities like LGBTQ people and immigrants.

Free Saudi women’s rights activists


Jailed Saudi activists for the right of women to drive cars

From the Gulf Institute for Human Rights:

HRW: UN: A Call to Free Saudi Women Activists

March 07,2019

A joint statement by 36 countries on March 7, 2019 calling on Saudi Arabia to improve its human rights record was a landmark step toward justice and accountability, Human Rights Watch said today.

It was the first time ever that governments, members of the United Nations Human Rights Council, have criticized their fellow member, the Saudi government.

At least some of these governments are rather Johnny-come-latelies and may stand accused of hypocrisy. Eg, the governments of the United Kingdom and of Belgium helped the Saudi regime to get into the the United Nations Human Rights Council and into the United Nations Women’s Rights Commission. Both governments still help selling British weapons and Belgian weapons to the Saudi absolute monarchy and their partners in war crimes, the UAE absolute monarchy, to kill Yemeni civilians. Will they stop doing that now? And will the French Macron government, another co-signatory, now at last stop selling French weapons to the dictatorial kingdom?

The statement, delivered by Iceland at the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva, condemns the murder of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, urges an end to Saudi Arabia’s use of counterterrorism regulations to target dissidents and human rights activists, and calls for the release of Saudi women’s rights activists detained beginning in May 2018.

Under the government that is effectively headed by Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman, Saudi authorities have intensified a coordinated crackdown on dissidents, human rights activists, and independent clerics. Countries at the Human Rights Council should support the joint statement, which is a rare and significant opportunity to press Saudi Arabia over its human rights abuses. The statement remains open for further endorsement until at least the end of the session on March 22.

“The joint statement to Saudi Arabia at the UN Human Rights Council sends a strong message to Saudi authorities that it needs to end its abusive treatment of activists and dissidents,” said John Fisher, Geneva director at Human Rights Watch. “Council member states should stand in solidarity with detained Saudi activists, press for their immediate release and maintain scrutiny of Saudi Arabia until there is substantial improvement in its rights record and meaningful reform.”

The joint statement reflected concerns also raised by UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet, who in her report to the council on March 6 noted that the persecution of peaceful activists clearly contradicts the spirit of Saudi Arabia’s proclaimed new reforms, and urged the release of the women’s rights defenders.

On May 15, 2018, just weeks before the Saudi authorities lifted the ban on women driving on June 24, authorities began arrests of prominent women’s rights activists

the activists for the right of women to drive cars, who had made the lifting of the ban possible

and accused several of them of grave crimes like treason that appear to be directly related to their activism.

On March 1, Saudi Arabia’s public prosecution agency announced that the women’s rights activists would face charges and be put on trial. Human rights organizations began reporting in November that Saudi interrogators tortured at least four of the women, including by administering electric shocks, whipping the women on their thighs, and sexually harassing and assaulting them.

Saudi Arabia came under intense criticism in 2018 following the October 2 murder of the prominent Saudi journalist Khashoggi inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul by Saudi agents. After weeks of denials and obfuscations, Saudi Arabia admitted to Khashoggi’s murder and announced the arrest of 18 people

18 scapegoats, to avoid arresting the crown prince

and the firing of senior officials. The Public Prosecution eventually charged 11 people in connection with the murder, including five against whom it is seeking the death penalty.

Saudi Arabia should cooperate fully with Agnes Callamard, the UN special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, on her inquiry into the Khashoggi murder. Callamard will present the report on her inquiry to the council at its next session, in June.

“As a member of the Human Rights Council, Saudi Arabia is required to maintain the ‘highest standards of human rights’, yet there is a massive gap between the country’s dismal rights record and the international standards it is sworn to uphold,” Fisher said. “Council members should be subject to more scrutiny, not less, and we urge the council to keep Saudi Arabia on its agenda until we see an end to the brutal targeting of defenders and dissidents, and genuine reform.”

The following States supported the joint statement:

Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

‘United States Senator raped by military officer’


This August 2016 video from the USA says about itself:

12 Harrowing Stories About Military Sexual Assault

From the BBC today:

Senator Martha McSally: I was raped by Air Force superior officer

A US senator has revealed that she was raped by a superior officer while serving in the Air Force.

Senator Martha McSally, who was the first female US fighter pilot to fly in combat, was speaking at a hearing on sex assaults in the military.

The Arizona Republican said she did not report the rape as she felt ashamed and confused, and distrusted the system.

In 2017 almost 6,800 sexual assaults were reported across the US military, a 10% rise on the previous year.

Ms McSally, 52, was speaking on Wednesday during a hearing of the Senate Armed Services subcommittee featuring victims of sexual assault.

“Like you, I also am a military sexual assault survivor, but unlike so many brave survivors, I didn’t report being sexually assaulted. Like so many women and men, I didn’t trust the system at the time,” she said.

“I blamed myself. I was ashamed and confused,” she added. “The perpetrators abused their position of power in profound ways. In one case I was preyed upon and raped by a superior officer.”

Years later, Ms McSally said, she tried to share her experiences with senior officers but met with “wholly inadequate responses”.

“I almost separated from the Air Force at 18 years of service over my despair. Like many victims, I felt like the system was raping me all over again.” …

It is not the first time Ms McSally has spoken about being a survivor of sexual abuse.

Last year, while running for the Senate, she told the Wall Street Journal her high school athletic coach had pressured her into having sex with him when she was 17.

She has previously said she was sexually harassed while in the military.

SENATOR REVEALS RAPE Sen. Martha McSally (R-Ariz.), the first female Air Force fighter pilot to fly in combat, said she was raped by a superior officer. She made the disclosure during a Senate hearing on sexual assault in the military. [AP]

Police sexual spying on British women


This video from Britain says about itself:

Spycops – The People’s Inquiry, July 2018

On 8 July 2018, people targeted by Britain’s political secret police held a ‘people’s inquiry’ at Conway Hall in London. Exasperated by the state public inquiry’s bias toward secrecy as it drags on for years without even formally starting, the victims of spycops held this theatrical event to envision what an effective inquiry would look like. …

It was part of a weekend of activities celebrating 50 years of progressive political campaigns achievements despite being infiltrated by counter-democtratic police. Full details of the weekend’s activities are here.

Our recommendations following the People’s Public Inquiry:

1. Full disclosure of all names – both cover and real – of officers from the disgraced political police units, accompanied by photographs

2. Release of the names of all groups suspected to have been spied upon

3. Release of all personal files on activists

4. Extension of the inquiry to all countries where the British spycops are known to have operated

5. The appointment of a diverse panel with experience relevatnt ot victims to assist the chair in making decisions and judgements

6. Inclusion of children and young people who had contact with spycops as Core Participants in the Inquiry

7. Urgent and immediate review of convictions where spycops had involvement in the cases & misled courts – 50 wrongful convictions have already been overturned and this is likley to be a fraction of the true total.

8. The Inquiry must extend its scope to understand political policing and its impact on democracy. This must include a thorough investigation into racist, sexist, anti-working class, anti-democratic behaviour on behalf of the spycops and those that instructed them to operate in this manner. Such political policing and political policing units must be abolished.

9. An urgent review into all undercover police activities to investigate whether the bad practice exposed by this inquiry has been extended to other areas of undercover operations

10. Make available the necessary resources of the judge to be able to do their job in the available time

11. Equalising of resources, the police are spending millions on stonewalling the inquiry, victims have almost nothing

12. Increase the severity of penalties for non-compliance with the inquiry

13. Investigation into collusion between police and corporate spies

For more information on Britain’s political undercover police, see our website.

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From daily News Line in Britain:

Tuesday, 5 March 2019

‘Conspiracy to rape’ – Victims of spy cops indict the state

WOMEN who found out their partners were undercover police spies insisted yesterday that they are the ‘victims of a conspiracy to rape’ by the police.

An ongoing public inquiry into undercover policing has seen several women win apologies and compensation. Over a number years dozens of undercover officers, part of the covert Special Demonstration Squad (SDS), were unmasked. They had infiltrated political parties, environmental groups and campaigns.

It also emerged that police had even spied on the family of Stephen Lawrence, the teenager murdered in London in 1993. It was at this point that Theresa May, then Home Secretary, had to order a public inquiry. This concluded that police who had long-term sexual relationships with their targets ‘abused their positions’. The police then issued an ‘unreserved apology.’

However, one of the victims known as ‘Rosa’ (not her real name) said: ‘If you put all these things together, you have a team of officers conspiring to rape.’ She and another woman have spoken of feeling betrayed after falling in love with men who turned out to be spies. In some cases the police spies actually fathered children with them.

‘They know there was no informed consent,’ she said. It’s the whole gang of them, and there’s no other way of terming it for me than a gang. You’ve got mentors, you’ve got handlers a whole backroom team of people monitoring – and directing it would seem – their relationships, their activities.’

For the first time Rosa, and the other woman, both from Wales, have revealed on camera the full story of how they became involved in intimate relationships which seemed genuine, but were in fact charades as police forces infiltrated groups they thought needed monitoring.

In 2000, Rosa spent three months in South Africa looking for Jim Sutton, the man she was in love with. The trouble was that man did not really exist. Rosa met him in a London pub while she was a political activist in a group called Reclaim the Streets.

A group waging non-violent actions against the power of big corporations.

Then Sutton stunned her by saying he wanted to go travelling, on his own – to ‘sort his head out’ and promptly disappeared. He said he planned to go to Turkey, Syria and then South Africa. Rosa started her own detective work but could find no trace of the family he said he had. So she headed to South Africa, to find him. I was walking round South Africa just saying “excuse me have you seen this person?” I was in torture, I needed answers.’

She found no trace of him, and returned to the UK. Her search continued though, and clues led her to south London, and the offices of the secret police unit Sutton worked for. Just two days later she found him. The encounter forced Sutton to confess he had been living a lie. He was not Jim Sutton, he was police officer Jim Boyling.