Sexually abusive Catholic priest relocated, not fired


This video from the USA says about itself:

Church Relocates Convicted Predator Priest To New Church

27 April 2016

A priest convicted of inappropriately touching a 19-year-old woman, has been reassigned to a new church. The priest has gone from San Diego to a new parish in Oklahoma. Ana Kasparian and Brett Erlich, hosts of The Young Turks, break it down. Tell us what you think in the comment section below.

“Fr. Jose Alexis Davila was convicted of inappropriately touching a 19-year-old woman in San Diego in 2011. Like most priests who have been caught or convicted of sex acts, Davila went to another church. The problem, however, is no one at the church was told about his crimes.

When the church of the Blessed Sacrament in Lawton, Oklahoma was introduced to Davila they were told only that “he has pastoral experience in the United States” but nothing about his criminal past or even the name of his previous church. None of the members had any idea he was convicted for groping a teenager, according to KFOR News.”

Read more here.

Saudi cleric defends women driving ban


This video says about itself:

Top Saudi Cleric: Women Are Banned From Driving To Prevent Sexual Asssault

15 April 2016

Saudi Arabia‘s most senior cleric has defended a ban on female drivers, saying it is “a dangerous matter that exposes women to evil”.

Read more here.

Donald Trump, women and the Republican party


This video from the USA says about itself:

1 April 2016

Even with Donald Trump‘s most vitriolic and dangerous attacks on women, the GOP leadership supports him.

UltraViolet Action in the USA writes about this:

Donald Trump reached shocking new lows this week, even for him.

Possibly more shocking: the number of Republican Party leaders who say they’ll endorse him if he’s the nominee (which is highly likely).

Trump’s racist and sexist rhetoric is defining this election, and every woman voter needs to know what the 2016 GOP is all about. Check out this short video and then please share it with everyone you know.

Trump, other US Republicans, break ‘loyalty pledge’


This video from the USA says about itself:

Trump Reneged On Supporting The GOP Candidate No Matter What

30 March 2016

If someone tells you the same thing five times, you probably should believe he means it.

Back in August, Donald Trump and all the other Republican candidates were given the chance to say they would pledge support to whomever the Republican nominee would be — and not wage an independent bid for the presidency if he or she didn’t win…

Read more here.

Republican Party crisis deepens as candidates renege on “loyalty” pledge. All three remaining candidates for the Republican presidential nomination declined to renew their pledges to support the party’s eventual standard-bearer, in back-to-back appearances Tuesday night at a town hall in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, televised over CNN: here.

Top Black Staffers Leave The Republican National Committee. The RNC, which has made broadening its base a priority, just lost its head of black outreach: here.

This video says about itself:

Teen Girl Pepper Sprayed At Trump Rally (VIDEO)

30 March 2016

A 15 year-old political activist claims she was sexually assaulted by a Trump supporter. While she was arguing with the Trump supporter, she was pepper sprayed by a different man wearing a “Make America Great Again” hat. John Iadarola (ThinkTank) and Jimmy Dore (The Jimmy Dore Show) hosts of The Young Turks discuss.

Do you think the man who pepper sprayed her will be arrested? Let us know in the comments below.

Read more here.

This video says about itself:

Trump: Punish Women For Abortions

30 March 2016

MSNBC pre-taped the Donald Trump portion of tonight’s town hall. In it, Chris Matthews pressed Trump on his stance on abortion. Trump said the laws should be changed and then we’ll have to look at how we’d punish women for having abortions. Ana Kasparian, Sam Schacher (Pop Trigger), and Kenny Hamilton, hosts of The Young Turks, break it down. Tell us what you think in the comment section below.

Donald Trump sparked a firestorm on Wednesday when he said women should be punished for getting illegal abortions.

“There has to be some form of punishment,” the GOP presidential front-runner told MSNBC’s Chris Matthews during a combative interview.

Matthews had asked Trump whether he would seek to ban abortion and how he would enforce such a policy.

“The answer is that there has to be some form of punishment,” Trump said in the interview taped for a town hall forum airing later Wednesday.

Asked what a ban on abortion would entail, Trump said: “Well you know you’ll go back to a position like they had, where people will perhaps go to illegal places, but you have to ban it.”

Read more here.

Ancient Greek poetess Sappho, new book


This video says about itself:

Sappho: Love and Life on Lesbos (2015) | Maya Vision International

Papyrology expert Margaret Mountford goes in search of the truth behind the legend of Sappho – the most controversial writer of the ancient world and the first authentic woman’s voice in western history. The mysterious discovery of a lost papyrus containing the words to songs unheard for seventeen hundred years sends Margaret on a journey to explore the truth about Sappho.

Was she indeed the first lesbian, a priestess, prostitute, a stern schoolmistress or an aristocratic lady of leisure as readers over the centuries have variously alleged? We ask how each generation’s view of the archetypal liberated woman of letters tells us as much about us and our fears and concerns as it does about her.

By Lucasta Miller in Britain today:

Searching for Sappho by Philip Freeman, book review: A valiant attempt to uncover the identity of the poet

Freeman uses Sappho’s poetry as a way in to exploring her culture, especially the experience of its women

“Burning Sappho” as Byron called her, remains an enigma. The first – or rather the earliest known – female poet, she came from the Greek island of Lesbos and was active during the late 7th and early 6th-century B.C. One century younger than Homer (whoever he was), she created a voice very different from his epic sweep. Achingly intimate in their first-person love confessions, her lyrics beg the question “who was she”?

In Searching for Sappho, Philip Freeman, an American academic, admits that it is impossible to write the real Sappho’s biography. Even the reconstruction of her oeuvre is trammelled by the fact that it exists in fragments mostly deriving from quotations in the works of much later Classical literary critics. Some of his most intriguing stories relate to the discovery by modern-age archaeologists of scraps of papyrus containing new examples of her work.

Apart from the texts themselves, everything we know about her is a myth. She was said in a Byzantine encyclopaedia to have been married to a wealthy merchant named Cercylas. But this turns out, more likely, to have been a dirty joke, as the name in Greek signifies “Mr Penis from Man Island”. Ovid disseminated the legend that she committed suicide out of lovesickness for a mysterious ferryman, Phaon, who had rejected her advances. Yet Sappho’s extant work includes recently discovered lines that suggest that she outlived the intensity of youth to reach old age (or what passed for old age in an era of low life expectancy).

Sappho is, of course, associated with above all with erotic passion. From her we get the words Sapphic and Lesbian. Her intense portrayal of same-sex eroticism is like nothing else in literature, especially her extended metaphors for physical arousal (Freeman points out that in the phrase usually translated “I am greener than grass”, the word “green” in fact means wet and dewy). And yet she clearly also had a husband as her poetry refers to her beloved daughter Cleis. Sexuality was more fluid in the days of the ancient Greeks. We learn here that their verb “to lesbianize” refers not to woman-on-woman activity but to blow-jobs.

Some have suggested that Sappho’s first-person lyricism was a sophisticated theatrical projection. Freeman asserts on the contrary that her work must have been based on authentic personal experience, although he can offer nothing more than his gut feel to support this argument. What he can do more objectively is to use her poetry as a way in to exploring her culture, especially the experience of its women. Sappho must have belonged to an economically privileged strata, given her education and that she alludes to a sea-faring merchant brother in poem. But in all walks of life, Greek women’s existence was founded on the family and marriage. Her work bears testimony to the wedding rituals of the era and also pays tribute to the intense emotions mothers felt for their children in a time and place when childbirth was as dangerous as the battlefield.

This short book provides an admirably clear and compact introduction to Sappho, while offering as a bonus a complete new translation of her frustratingly incomplete known oeuvre (one fragment reads simply “and I to you … of a white goat”, leaving the mind to boggle). It will whet your appetite, but leave you in a state of unsatisfied desire.