Conservatives admit British wars stimulate terrorism


This 10 October 2016 video says about itself:

How a British Public Relations Firm Helped Shape the War on Terror

Fake News and False Flags (2016): In May 2006 Martin Wells was employed by a top London PR firm,
Bell Pottinger. In the first interview of its kind, we hear how he was sent to Baghdad to work on the US military’s covert terrorism propaganda war.

Stationed in the US military’s Camp Victory in Baghdad, PR firm Bell Pottinger created and disseminated Arabic-style news to the local region in a £120 million/year deal with the US government. “We were to make it look like it was created by Arabic TV”, says Wells of the everyday Iraqi news covering local atrocities, along with TV commercials “saying Al-Qaeda was bad”. But Wells was also tasked with creating 10-minute video CDs made exclusively from Al-Qaeda footage, approved by US general Petraeus and the Pentagon. These fake propaganda CDs were encoded with tracking software, then spread by US marines while out on raids. Wells then monitored the CD location and spread of the viewership by Google Analytics, “looking for a trail to someone who could possibly be a threat”.

By Milan Rai in Britain:

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Boris Johnson believes Britain’s wars fuel terrorism

THAT’S right. The Prime Minister believes that the Iraq war increased the risk of terrorism in Britain.

He is one of several leading Conservatives who have expressed that view — based on the judgement of British intelligence, the police force and the Civil Service.

In July 2005, just days after the July 7 terror attacks that killed 52 people in London, Johnson, then just a backbench Conservative MP, wrote in the Spectator: “It is difficult to deny that they have a point, the Told-You-So brigade.”

Johnson referred to the Joint Intelligence Committee assessment, five weeks before the 2003 Iraq war, that the threat of al-Qaida terrorism “would be heightened by military action against Iraq.” (The JIC oversees all the intelligence agencies — MI6, MI5, GCHQ and Defence Intelligence — and is the top-level intelligence body advising the prime minister.)

Johnson accepted that the situation in Iraq since the US-led invasion was “very far from ideal” — “and if any anti-Western mullah wanted a text with which to berate Britain and America for their callousness, it is amply provided by Fallujah” — the Iraqi city that had shortly before been demolished by US-led forces — “or the mere fact that Tony Blair cannot even tell you how many Iraqis have been killed since their liberation — only that the number is somewhere between ten and twenty thousand.”

An extremely conservative estimate.

Johnson also accepted that, although terror attacks by “murderous Islamic fundamentalists” had started long before the 2003 Iraq war, “the war has unquestionably sharpened the resentments felt by such people in this country, and given them a new pretext.”

The Prime Minister wrote: “The Iraq war did not introduce the poison into our bloodstream but, yes, the war did help to potentiate that poison.”

According to the Oxford dictionary, “potentiate” is a technical term meaning: “Increase the power, effect, or likelihood of (something, especially a drug or physiological reaction).”

So, according to Johnson, Britain’s participation in the US-led invasion and occupation of Iraq increased the “likelihood” of al-Qaida terror attacks in Britain and/or the damaging “power” and “effect” of al-Qaida terror attacks in Britain.

The Prime Minister is not the only Conservative to have been realistic about the effect of Britain’s aggressive foreign policy.

Ken Clarke launched his campaign to be leader of the Conservative party in September 2005 with a speech about the connection between British foreign policy and domestic terrorism.

Clarke admitted that “the decision by the UK government to become the leading ally of president Bush in the Iraq debacle has made Britain one of the foremost targets for Islamic extremists.”

Also in 2005, we had some foreign-policy realism from former Conservative foreign secretary Douglas Hurd; from former Tory health secretary Stephen Dorrell, and from former Tory chancellor Norman Lamont.

Hurd said: “The likelihood of young Muslims, whether in Britain or elsewhere, being attracted to terrorism was increased by our action in Iraq.

“We attacked a Muslim country on grounds which turned out to be empty. We broke international law. We faced no serious threat from Saddam Hussein and received no authority from the security council. We brought about the deaths of thousands of innocent Iraqis.”

Dorrell accepted that the Iraq war had made Britain more vulnerable to terrorist attack: “Of course that is true. Who do they think they are kidding?”

Lamont also endorsed Ken Clarke’s argument and argued: “Iraq has been this country’s biggest foreign policy disaster since Suez, has made Britain and the world a more dangerous place, and yet has hardly been criticised at all by the Conservative Party.”

These men were not thrown out of the party for their outrageous remarks.

Douglas Hurd, a Conservative peer in 2005, is still a Conservative.

Norman Lamont, also a Conservative peer in 2005, is still a Conservative peer.

Stephen Dorrell remained a Tory MP until 2015.

Ken Clarke, a Tory MP since 1970, was thrown out of the party, but not for saying that the Iraq war had “made Britain one of the foremost targets for Islamic extremists.”

He was thrown out in September for voting against a no-deal Brexit.

Johnson has not suffered any political damage for saying in 2005 that the Iraq war “potentiated” the risk of terrorism in Britain.

One reason for this Conservative outbreak of realism was the solid consensus of opinion in security and intelligence circles that “the issue of British foreign policy and the perception of its negative effect on Muslims globally plays a significant role in creating feelings of anger and impotence amongst especially the younger generation of British Muslims” and “seems to be a key driver behind recruitment by extremist organisations.”

That was how Michael Jay, the top civil servant at the foreign office, summed things up in a letter to another top civil servant in May 2004.

In 2004, Jay and others compiled a secret report on “Young Muslims and Extremism”, a joint Foreign Office-Home Office report which was later leaked to the Sunday Times.

This identified British foreign policy — “a perceived ‘double standard’ in the foreign policy of Western governments, in particular Britain and the US” — as a key motive for involvement in terrorism.

After the July 7 attacks, British counter-terror police carried out a similar investigation, which had a headline over one section: “Foreign policy and Iraq; Iraq HAS had a huge impact.”

All of this is important information in its own right. It’s especially important if there is any criticism of Jeremy Corbyn for his speech after the London Bridge attack.

He rightly said: “The threat of terrorism cannot and should not be reduced to questions of foreign policy alone. But too often the actions of successive governments have fuelled, not reduced that threat.”

Milan Rai is the editor of Peace News and the author of 7/7: The London Bombings, Islam and the Iraq War.

Father Of London Attack Victim Calls Out Boris Johnson For Exploiting Son’s Death. Jack Merritt would have been “livid” to see the prime minister using his death in Friday’s London Bridge terror attack to justify stricter prison sentences, his father has said: here.

British Conservative Islamophobia, fraud scandals


British Tory Peer Baroness Warsi

By Lamiat Sabin in Britain:

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Baroness Warsi calls for specific inquiry into Islamophobia after dozens of Tories suspended

TORY peer Baroness Warsi said today that the Conservative Party has a “deep problem” with Islamophobia, after dozens of Tories were suspended pending an investigation into alleged anti-Muslim hate.

Twenty five sitting and former Tory councillors are reportedly among those identified, in documents obtained by The Guardian, as allegedly posting or endorsing online Islamophobic posts.

Posts include calls for mosques to be banned, claims that Islam intends to “turn the world Muslim” and references to Muslims as “barbarians” and “the enemy within”.

Ms Warsi accused her own party of being “dismissive” of the issue — four years after problems were first brought to light.

She also said she is “disappointed” that the party is “trying to dilute” the investigation into Islamophobia by holding an inquiry into all forms of prejudice.

Ms Warsi told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that there had been “dossier after dossier, dozens and dozens of cases presented with the most vile evidence of racism within the party at every level from MPs all the way down to our ordinary activists.”

The recent dossier, compiled by an anonymous anti-racism campaigner using the Twitter handle @MatesJacob, increases pressure on Prime Minister Boris Johnson — who has been condemned for saying that niqab-wearing Muslim women look like “letterboxes” — to hold an independent inquiry specifically into Islamophobia within his party.

Shadow equalities minister Naz Shah said: “The Conservative Party is rife with Islamophobia, racism and bigotry from top to bottom, but we have no faith that Boris Johnson will do anything about it.”

Muslim Council of Britain secretary-general Harun Khan said that the type of Islamophobic comments made by Tory members now coming to light are a “regular occurrence” and are “endemic” in the party.

He said: “From members at the grassroots to councillors, MPs, members of Cabinet and the Prime Minister, there are hugely concerning levels of hatred against Muslims throughout the party.

“Yet the Conservative Party still refuses to hold an independent investigation into Islamophobia despite the Prime Minister committing to this and instead deems it appropriate to gloss over the issue with a broad inquiry into racism.”

He also said that the Tories lack transparency on how many members have been suspended over allegations of Islamophobia and how many have been readmitted.

British Conservative candidate Chris Davies

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Fraudster Chris Davies withdrawn from standing as a Tory candidate in North Wales

FRAUDSTER Chris Davies has withdrawn from standing as a Conservative candidate in Ynys Mon following criticism that his selection made a “mockery” of the people of the island.

The former Tory MP for Brecon and Radnorshire was sacked in June after being found guilty of faking expenses claims.

However, the Conservatives still selected Mr Davies to run for Ynys Mon — the North Wales constituency that includes the island of Anglesey and the smaller Holy Island.

The appointment sparked outrage among Ynys Mon residents and opposition candidates.

Plaid Cymru candidate Aled ap Dafydd said: “By imposing a convicted former MP who was found guilty of a false expenses claim as the candidate for the island shows how little they care about Ynys Mon.

“This makes a mockery of the people of the island.”

Mr Davies said he decided to step down due to “criticism in the media.”

The disgraced former MP was convicted in March after he admitted submitting two false expenses invoices for nine photographs costing £700 to decorate his new office.

He was fined £1,500, ordered to pay £2,500 towards legal costs and told to carry out 50 hours of community service.

The Labour candidate for Ynys Mon Mary Roberts said Mr Davies’s appointment had been an “insult” to the people of Anglesey.

“It’s insulting to the people of Ynys Mon for the Conservatives to have considered parachuting him in as a parliamentary candidate,” she said.

“Unsurprisingly he’s been forced to withdraw. Anglesey deserves better than this.”

A TORY candidate in Scotland has been suspended over offensive internet posts. Ryan Houghton, candidate for Aberdeen North, was dropped by the Conservative Party after the discovery of offensive social media posts. His suspension follows the National newspaper’s publication of a long list of anti-semitic, Islamophobic and homophobic posts by Mr Houghton on a martial arts forum in 2013: here.

British Conservative racist, pro-rape candidates


This 21 September 2018 video from Britain says about itself:

The Conservative party is racist | Owen Jones talks …

Conservative members of the European Parliament recently decided to give their backing to the far-right Hungarian autocrat, Viktor Orbán. They were the only centre-right party to back Orbán, who has been accused of both antisemitism and Islamophobia amongst other things.

But we shouldn’t be surprised. The Tories have a long history of racism in their ranks. They’ve recently ignored
Baroness Sayeeda Warsi’s calls to hold an inquiry into the rampant Islamophobia in their ranks, Zac Goldsmith’s campaign to become London mayor was dripping with Islamophobia, Boris Johnson‘s political and journalistic career has been characterised by racist bilge and that’s before we even get into the likes of Margaret Thatcher and Enoch Powell. The Conservative party fans bigotry and divides communities in order to gain political power. It always has done and, I think, always will do.

By Ceren Sagir in Britain:

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Tory candidate called unfit to stand over ‘disgusting racism’

ANOTHER Tory parliamentary candidate faced calls to stand down today over his “disgustingly racist” views on immigrants whom he blamed for “doubling the rate of HIV” in Britain.

In a 2003 article for the Spectator, South Cambridgeshire candidate Anthony Browne wrote that “letting in too many germs” will claim more lives than “letting in terrorists” through the then Labour government’s migration policy.

The former adviser to Prime Minister Boris Johnson said that immigration “brings the epidemics that blight poorer countries: HIV infection, tuberculosis and hepatitis” and claimed that “infected immigrants” arriving in Britain were “doubling the rate of HIV.”

In his book Do We Need Mass Immigration?, Mr Browne said African immigration “has overtaken gay sex as the main cause of HIV,” and said they should be treated “where they live” rather than “on the NHS.”

Stand Up To Racism co-convenor Weyman Bennett said: “Johnson and Browne have embraced the most racist and disgusting words and taken a right-wing discourse into discussions of the Muslim community and the LGBT community.

“This candidate is not fit to stand in the election and Johnson is not fit to be PM. It’s time to take a stand against racism.”

Shadow women and equalities minister Naz Shah called the claims “disgusting racism” and urged the PM to personally intervene and remove Mr Browne’s candidacy.

A Tory spokeswoman said Mr Browne has apologised for the comments “and sincerely regrets them.”

Wakefield Tory candidate Antony Calvert was pressured to step down on Sunday for his racist and misogynistic Facebook comments days after Broadland candidate Nick Conrad stood down as his rape-apologist comments on live radio re-emerged.

Former Welsh secretary Alun Cairns also resigned ahead of the Tory campaign launch for lying about his knowledge of his aide’s alleged sabotage of a rape trial.

Gower candidate Francesca O’Brien, who said contestants on Benefits Street should be “put down”, has ignored calls to step down.