Saudi regime killing Yemeni children, United Nations say


This video says about itself:

18 October 2016

Heartbreaking: Dying child screaming don’t bury me, in Taiz, Yemen.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Yemen: UN urged to put Saudis on blacklist over child killings

Saturday 19th August 2017

THE Saudi-led invasion coalition is responsible for more than half of all child deaths in Yemen, according to a leaked draft of a report by United Nations secretary-general Antonio Guterres.

The document, which was passed to US news agency Associated Press on Thursday, says the UN has verified that there were 1,340 child casualties last year and attributed 683 — or 51 per cent — to attacks carried out by the coalition.

It also reveals that nearly three-quarters of attacks on schools and hospitals — 38 of 52 — were perpetrated by the coalition.

Saudi Arabia and eight regional allies launched a bombing campaign against Yemen in March 2015 after former president Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi — whose term had expired — was ousted by a revolt by the Shia Houthis …

US news magazine Foreign Policy reported on Wednesday that UN special representative for children and armed conflict Virigina Gamba intends to recommend that the coalition be added to the list of countries that kill and maim children.

Last year, a UN report blamed the coalition for 60 per cent of 1,953 child deaths and injuries — prompting Saudi Arabia’s addition to the blacklist.

But former secretary-general Ban Ki Moon reversed that decision and removed mention of Saudi Arabia from the report after Riyadh threatened to cut aid funding for Palestine and other projects.

Saudi royal armed forces kiling their unarmed own people


Night-time funeral of a victim of the Saudi armed forces in the Qatif district

From daily News Line in Britain:

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Saudi forces kill unarmed Shia civilians in Awamiya

SAUDI security forces killed and injured unarmed civilians when they surrounded and sealed off the predominantly Shia town of Awamiya in July 2017 as they confronted an armed group hiding in a historic neighbourhood slated for demolition, Human Rights Watch said on Sunday.

The violence in the Eastern province, which began in May, has resulted in deaths and injuries among the residents, local activists said, and caused significant damage to the town, based on an assessment of satellite imagery.

Residents and activists say that most residents have fled Awamiya, and those who remain lack essential services such as medical care. The town remains sealed off. Saudi Arabia announced plans to demolish and redevelop the al-Musawara neighbourhood of Awamiya, Qatif governorate, in 2016, citing health and safety reasons.

Demolition began on May 10, after al-Musawara residents were evacuated, but met with armed resistance. Awamiya residents told Human Rights Watch that security forces have fired into populated areas far from al-Musawara, killing residents, occupied a public school, closed clinics and pharmacies, and prevented essential services such as ambulances from reaching the area.

Security forces engaged in shoot-outs with an unknown number of armed men inside al-Musawara, and on July 26 brought in additional armoured vehicles and sealed the town’s entrances and exits, residents and activists said. Awamiya has a longstanding reputation of opposition to Saudi rule and has been the site of protests about government discrimination against Saudi Shia.

It is the hometown of a prominent cleric, Nimr al-Nimr, who was executed in January 2016 over his encouragement of protests in 2011 and 2012. The execution sparked a series of events leading to a breakdown of diplomatic relations with Iran and heightened sectarian tensions across the Gulf region.

On July 28, Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland stated that she was ‘deeply concerned’ about photos purporting to show Saudi security forces using Canadian-made Terradyne Gurkha RPV-model armoured vehicles. She ordered an investigation into how Saudi forces are using the vehicles.

Saudi forces have also deployed another type of armoured vehicle manufactured by the South African company F & R Catai to Awamiya. The automatic cannon in this vehicle’s turret can penetrate and cause considerable damage to buildings and other infrastructure.

Human Rights Watch analysed satellite imagery that shows extensive damage to the neighbourhood and the town’s main commercial street bordering it. While much of the damage is due to the demolition, the images also show buildings and areas damaged by the violence. Activists and residents said the armed men are on most-wanted lists authorities have issued since 2012 for protest-related crimes in the area.

Saudi Arabia announced on August 10 that security forces had forced nearly all ‘terrorists and criminal elements’ out of al-Musawara, and authorities took international journalists on a tour of the neighbourhood on August 9. Saudi activists said the violence has killed more than a dozen people, both Saudis and foreigners, in addition to at least five armed militants.

A Saudi Interior Ministry official said that eight members of the police and four members of the special forces had been killed. The Saudi authorities have not released information on resident casualties. A three-year-old boy reportedly died on August 9 from injuries suffered when an armoured vehicle fired on his family’s car in June.

Five residents interviewed by Human Rights Watch said that Saudi security forces have put people in Awamiya at risk, arbitrarily shooting at or arresting those who emerged from their houses. The residents said that to their knowledge Saudi authorities never issued an order for people to leave Awamiya, and their only chance to leave safely has been for short periods allowed by security forces since July 26.

The residents said that local volunteers and activists coordinated the evacuation without assistance from Saudi authorities. They said that security forces turn away anyone who attempts to return to Awamiya to check on relatives or recover property or possessions. Local residents said that people have been fired at and injured in areas such as al-Shukrallah, al-Jumaymah, and al-Rif neighbourhoods, which are west of security forces who are stationed between these neighbourhoods and al-Musawara to the east.

The residents said they had not seen any armed militants in these areas. Five Awamiya residents and three activists close to the situation said that a majority of the town’s inhabitants fled after security forces escalated the situation on July 26. They said that most fled between July 27 and 28 when the town’s electricity was cut off for more than 24 hours, leaving people exposed to temperatures of up to 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit) without air conditioning. Residents and activists said that the electricity grid had been damaged by gunfire, but did not know who was responsible.

The residents said that security forces closed all of Awamiya’s clinics and pharmacies in May, which they believed was to ensure that militants could not seek medical treatment. Since July 26, they said, security forces had not allowed emergency services to reach the wounded or taken steps to provide humanitarian assistance to people who remain there, though all the shops in the area were closed.

They also said that security forces had occupied a boys’ secondary school, which borders al-Musawara, and circulated a video that they said showed government forces firing a rocket-propelled grenade from the roof into al-Musawara. Human Rights Watch also determined that the rocket-propelled grenade was fired into al-Musawara in the general direction of the Ahmed bin Mahmoud mosque.

UN experts on cultural rights, adequate housing and extreme poverty condemned Saudi Arabia’s destruction of al-Musawara on May 24, noting that the operation had forced ‘residents out of their homes and of the neighbourhood, fleeing for their lives.’ They stated that the destruction of al-Musawara would ‘erase the traces of … historic and lived cultural heritage.’

Al-Musawara resident, ‘Sami,’ whose name, as with others interviewed, has been changed for his protection, said he had not worked since the fighting started because his shop is on the main street near al-Musawara, in the area where security forces had sporadically opened fire on shops and homes. ‘My shop is covered in bullet holes,’ he said. ‘I am certain that security forces are responsible because the size of the bullets are medium and large, which only security forces possess.’

‘Ali’ a Awamiya resident who fled on July 30, said: ‘The security situation in Awamiya has been terrible for the past 80 days. While I was still in Awamiya, the town was constantly bombarded by shelling and security forces were going around shooting in residential neighbourhoods at random. We were too scared to leave our homes and most of the shops were shut down or burned. Anything that moved became a target.’

Another resident, ‘Ahmed,’ said that he came under fire driving in al-Shukrallah on July 29: ‘I am from the al-Jumaymah neighbourhood. I went in the morning to help my mom and dad. When I left I went toward al-Shukrallah to try to leave Awamiya via a back road through farms. I was driving between houses when someone fired at me and the bullet hit the house next to my car. I saw an armoured vehicle at the end of the street … I never saw any armed militants in this area.’

Saudi genocidal war on Yemen


This video says about itself:

Yemen war pushes country ‘towards the edge of a cliff’ – UN

5 August 2017

Yemen’s ongoing conflict and a “man-made” humanitarian catastrophe has “no end in sight,” the head of the UN Development Programme (UNDP) in the war-torn country has said, warning that nearly 7 million people are at risk of starvation.

British Conservative government covers up Saudi export of terrorism


This video says about itself:

Saudi Arabia fueling extremism in UK, Europe: Ex-UK ambassador

13 July 2017

A former British ambassador to Saudi Arabia says the kingdom is directly involved in funding extremism in Europe.

William Patey accused the Saudis of funding and promoting the Salifist Wahhabi ideology urging Britain to address the matter with Riyadh. The ideology has inspired Takfiri terrorists across the globe including Daesh [ISIS] and Al-Qaeda. Patey’s revelations came a day after London said it would not publish, in full, a report on extremist funding in the country, citing security reasons. Britain’s opposition parties said the government was trying to protect its ally, Saudi Arabia, by not fully publishing the report that was commissioned by former Prime Minister David Cameron in 2015.

By Jean Shaoul in Britain:

May government conceals UK-Saudi terror connections

25 July 2017

Survivors and bereaved relatives of the 9/11 terror attacks in the United States have demanded that Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May finally publish a report dealing with the foreign funding of Islamist extremism in Britain.

The report is believed to highlight the role of Saudi Arabia in sponsoring Islamist extremism and terrorism.

Last week, Home Secretary Amber Rudd said the investigation had been concluded, but would not be published for reasons of “national security.” Both Rudd and Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson had earlier indicated that the contents of the report would never be made public.

The report will, however, be made available to privy councillors, including Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and Shadow Home Secretary, Diane Abbott, who will be sworn to secrecy about its contents.

The report was commissioned by David Cameron and approved by May, as part of a deal with the Liberal Democrats to secure the party’s support before a crucial vote to carry out airstrikes on Syria in December 2015.

The survivors’ letter adds to the growing number of voices accusing May of suppressing the report due to incriminating evidence relating to Saudi Arabia. There are powerful commercial, but also political, reasons why this is necessary.

Saudi Arabia is the biggest market for UK arms and there are reports that Tory politicians have received nearly £100,000 in gifts, trips and fees from Riyadh. The scandal over the report follows opposition to the government’s refusal to criticise Saudi Arabia for its human rights record and its approval of £3.5 billion of arms sales to the country, which has used these weapons in attacks on civilians in the war against neighbouring Yemen.

Then there is the vital role of Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states in funding Islamist groups that provide essential proxy forces for the imperialist powers in Libya, Iraq and Syria. To acknowledge how blow-back from these filthy imperialist adventures leads to terror attacks in the UK and elsewhere would not only threaten lucrative trade deals, but also expose the war propaganda emanating from London, Washington and other Western capitals that they are backing democratic and “moderate” movements in their efforts to engineer regime change to secure control of the oil-rich Middle East.

Rudd was therefore forced to play down the suggestion that foreign funding was a factor in fomenting Islamist extremism in Britain. She issued a statement, based upon a 585-word summary of the report, saying that most of extremist funding in the UK came from “small, anonymous public donations, with the majority of these donations most likely coming from UK-based individuals.”

Some extremist organisations posed as charities in order to “increase their credibility and to take advantage of Islam’s emphasis on charity,” while being “purposefully vague about their activities and their charitable status.”

The statement acknowledged, “For a small number of organisations with which there are extremism concerns, overseas funding is a significant source of income.” But Rudd refused to say where the money was coming from and insisted that overseas funding was not a significant source for the vast majority of extremist groups in the UK.

Her statement flies in the face of widespread reports from the US and other official sources that Riyadh has spent $50 billion since the 1970s promoting its particular brand of Islamism—Wahhabism—around the globe, in what one think tank described as the “largest worldwide propaganda campaign ever mounted.”

Although these annual expenditures are now believed to be about $4 billion, it is unknown how much is sent to Britain. There are believed to be 110 mosques associated with Wahhabism.

To underscore the degree of Western collusion with such forces, no less than 15 of the 19 Al Qaeda terrorists involved in 9/11 were Saudi citizens who were allowed to fly in and out of the US without hindrance. The now deceased leader of Al Qaeda, Osama Bin Laden, is a member of a billionaire Saudi family with close ties to the Saudi royal family. Relatives of 9/11 victims have filed claims for billions of dollars in damages from Saudi Arabia, citing King Salman and other members of the ruling family as defendants.

Rudd’s statement is contradicted by an email written by former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, released by WikiLeaks, describing Saudi Arabia and Qatar as direct supporters of ISIS and other groups. This funding was part of Saudi Arabia’s broader strategy of promoting political Islam as a means of countering the growth of any progressive political tendencies within the working class.

Britain supported Saudi Arabia and Pakistan’s use of Islamist terrorist groups for covert operations in Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and Chechnya, the location of the huge energy resources of Central Asia, facilitating its energy corporations’ access to the region. It gave the nod to Islamabad’s and Riyadh’s funding and arming of the Taliban, which in turn gave succour to Al Qaeda, originally funded by Saudi Arabia and the CIA, and worked closely with them and similar forces as it suited their interests.

In the 1990s, London gave sanctuary to numerous Islamist groups, with several leading figures saying that Whitehall had given them a “green light” so long as they only carried out terrorist activities overseas. Among those involved were Abu Hamza and Abu Qatada, the Jordanian cleric sentenced in absentia for terrorist activities who reportedly worked as a double agent for MI5. The security forces used the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), based in London, in an unsuccessful MI6-sponsored attempt on the life of Libya’s then leader, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, and then again in the war for his removal and murder in 2011.

The most recent UK terror attacks two months ago in Manchester and London testify to the closest relations with these Islamist forces.

One of the attackers in the London Bridge killings, Yousseff Zaghba, was stopped at an Italian airport while attempting to travel to Syria, freely admitting that he “wanted to be a terrorist” and carrying ISIS literature. Another was featured in a British television documentary that chronicled his confrontation with and detention by police after he unfurled an ISIS flag in Regent’s Park in London.

The authorities were equally familiar with Manchester suicide bomber, Salman Abedi. In 2011, they allowed his parents, members of the LIFG, to return to Libya to assist the US-NATO regime-change operation against Gaddafi. Abedi himself met Islamic State operatives in Libya, veterans of the Syrian civil war, with whom he maintained close connections in Manchester.

Despite the 16-year-long “war on terror,” these elements move freely in and out of Britain, Europe, the Middle East and the US under what amounts to state protection. They are never stopped at passport control because they are vital intelligence “assets.”

Terrorist attacks by these “assets” also provide the pretext for further repression, surveillance, attacks on democratic rights and the deployment of troops and armed police on the streets.

British authorities are looking with increasing interest at their neighbour across the Channel, where France has declared a state of emergency and is seeking to embed it into law. These measures are of little value in preventing future attacks, but are indispensable for controlling the working class and suppressing social unrest.

Saudi bombs kill Yemeni civilians with cholera


This video says about itself:

24 July 2017

More than 600,000 Yemenis could have cholera before the end of the year, the International Committee of the Red Cross has warned.

Nearly 2,000 people have died from the pandemic and 300,000 people are infected.

Al Jazeera’s Sara Khairat reports.

From daily News Line in Britain:

Tuesday, 25 July 2017

YEMEN CHOLERA EPIDEMIC

THE International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has warned that about 600,000 people in war-torn Yemen could contract cholera by December this year, a figure which is almost one in every 45 people in the 27.5-million-strong country.

The ICRC’s news on Sunday came as the relentless bombardment of the impoverished country by Saudi Arabia’s war planes has not only brought Yemen’s health care system to the verge of total collapse but also taken a heavy toll on the country’s facilities and infrastructure, destroying many hospitals, schools, and factories.

According to the ICRC’s the highly contagious disease is ‘a direct consequence of a conflict that has devastated civilian infrastructure and brought the whole health system to its knees.’

Both the ICRC and World Health Organisation (WHO) have already announced in recent reports that over 370,000 people across the country had caught cholera and 1,800 others had lost their lives after succumbing to the infectious illness since late April in Yemen’s second cholera outbreak in less than a year.

Caused by ingestion of food or water contaminated with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, the cholera infection first became an epidemic last October. Since March 2015, Yemen has suffered heavy air strikes by Saudi fighter jets as part of a brutal campaign in an attempt to crush the popular Houthi Ansarullah movement and reinstall the former president, Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, a staunch ally of Riyadh.

The relentless aerial aggression has put well over half of all health facilities in Yemen in a state of complete or partial shutdown. There are critical shortages in medical staff in over 40 per cent of all districts, according to Yemen’s Health Ministry.

Nearly 3.3 million Yemeni people, including 2.1 million children, are currently suffering from acute malnutrition. The war has so far killed over 12,000 Yemenis and wounded thousands more. On Saturday, the International humanitarian agency Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) raised alarm at the humanitarian crisis in Yemen, calling the situation a ‘shame on humanity.’

They added: ‘Sixty per cent of the country is food insecure and over half the population is unable (to access) safe drinking water. Many areas in Yemen are just one step away from a famine situation.’

The US and the UK have been providing most of the military ordnance used by Saudi Arabia in the war. London has sold £3.3 billion worth of weapons since the beginning of Saudi Arabia’s war on Yemen in March 2015.

Washington also sealed a multi-billion arms deal with Riyadh when US President Donald Trump made his maiden visit abroad in May. The deal, which is worth $350 billion over 10 years, $110 billion of which will take effect immediately, was hailed by the White House as a significant expansion of the security relationship between the two countries.

To combat cholera in Yemen, one scientist goes back to basics. As epidemic rages on, health care system is close to collapse. By Cassie Martin, 1:00pm, August 7, 2017.