Peregrine falcon couples sharing eggs incubation


This video from England says about itself:

15 April 2015

In the run up to egg hatching, pairs of peregrines across the country are sharing the incubation responsibility. Here we see the Bath pair changing over three times during a period of 15 hours.

New York City rare birds update


This video from the USA says about itself:

Crested Caracaras in the Rio Grande Valley, Texas
30 apr. 2013

Crested Caracaras at Martin Refuge. Meat scraps from roadkill, taxidermists or chicken from the grocery store is put out to bring in caracaras for people to photograph.

From The City Birder blog in New York City in the USA:

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, April 10, 2015

– RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Apr. 10, 2015
* NYNY1504.10

– Birds mentioned

CRESTED CARACARA+ (Orange County)
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

HARLEQUIN DUCK
Red-necked Grebe
Snowy Egret
Glossy Ibis
Black Vulture
NORTHERN GOSHAWK
Broad-winged Hawk
Lesser Yellowlegs
ICELAND GULL
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GLAUCOUS GULL
SNOWY OWL
Chimney Swift
Pileated Woodpecker
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Wood Thrush
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
Pine Warbler
Palm Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Louisiana Waterthrush
Eastern Towhee
Boat-tailed Grackle

– Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form …

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin – Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

To report sightings call:
Tom Burke (212) 372-1483 (weekdays, during the day)
Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 (Long Island)

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, April 10th 2015 at 7pm. The highlights of today’s tape are an Orange County CRESTED CARACARA, SNOWY OWL, NORTHERN GOSHAWK, HARLEQUIN DUCK, GLAUCOUS GULL, ICELAND GULL and YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER plus other Spring migrants.

This morning a CRESTED CARACARA was found in Montgomery, Orange County. The bird was seen on the west side of River Road about a mile north of Route 17K frequenting the field near two ponds. Issues to be addressed of course would be the bird’s provenance and whether it is a northern or southern Caracara. The northern would presumably be the expected species. The bird did disappear later in the day.

Otherwise with the Spring season somewhat delayed the March doldrums have been pushed back into April but once the weather breaks for good migrants should begin streaming rather than trickling in.

Most of the rarities have a Winter flavor including SNOWY OWL Monday to Wednesday in the marshes off Dune Road west of Shinnecock Inlet near Tiana Beach. Fortunately this owl seems to be staying far enough out to discourage pursuit. The immature NORTHERN GOSHAWK was reported again at Jones Beach West End on Thursday and a pair of HARLEQUIN DUCKS continue around Point Lookout seen Thursday off Lido Beach. In Brooklyn both GLAUCOUS and ICELAND GULLS continue to be seen around Gravesend Bay including near the Caesar’s Bay shopping mall. Other single GLAUCOUS GULLS were noted at Shinnecock Inlet Monday and Orient Point Thursday. A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was at Jones Beach field 6 Thursday and a few RED-NECKED GREBES also remain along the Brooklyn and Staten Island shoreline.

Two somewhat out of place species were a female BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE spotted on the east side of the landfill at Croton Point Park last Sunday and single PILEATED WOODPECKERS in a Bethpage yard last Sunday and at the Cemetery of the Resurrection on Staten Island at least through Thursday.

Two BLACK VULTURES spotted over Central Park Monday afternoon were subsequently seen continuing north over Inwood Hill Park.

Among the landbirds certainly the YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER at Valley Stream State Park was the most unusual this bird found March 30th still frequenting the same area at least to Wednesday at the south end of the park and sometimes just across Hendrickson Avenue. Another YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER was back at Connetquot River State Park in Oakdale as of Tuesday. Please keep any disturbance of the nesting Connetquot birds to an absolute minimum.

A few new arrivals and an increasing number of those appearing a little earlier. Besides the PINE and PALM WARBLERS and LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSHES scattered about a BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER appeared in Prospect Park Sunday. Other reported passerines have included BANK, NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED and CLIFF SWALLOWS, HOUSE WREN, WOOD THRUSH, some BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHERS as of Monday, EASTERN TOWHEE and various sparrows.

Among the arriving non-passerines have been SNOWY EGRET, GLOSSY IBIS, LESSER YELLOWLEGS, BROAD-WINGED HAWK and CHIMNEY SWIFT.

To phone in reports on Long Island, call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or during the day except Sunday call Tom Burke at (212) 372-1483.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

Amur falcon spring migration starts in South Africa


This video from India says about itself:

26 July 2014

THE VIDEO IS SHOT IN NAGALAND INDIA. THE CONSERVATION OF AMUR FALCON. NAGALAND HAS BEEN DECLARED AS “FALCON CAPITAL OF WORLD”. COMMUNITIES, NGOS FOREST DEPARTMENT HAVE PARTICIPATED IN CONSERVATION OF AMUR FALCON. THE FILM IS SHOT BY NATURAL NAGAS AND DEPARTMENT OF FORESTS, ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT AND WILDLIFE.

From daily The Independent in South Africa:

When birds of a feather flock together

March 30 2015 at 05:30pm

By Tony Carnie

Most of us know that summer is coming to an end and winter will soon be upon us.

But what was the peculiar “telepathic” signal from nature that seems to have echoed through the bush of southern Africa last Thursday.

That’s the question bird watchers are asking after seeing thousands of tiny falcons beginning to flock together in preparation for a remarkable journey to the other side of the world.

Just after 7.20am on Thursday, Ian Macdonald of Kube Yini Private Game Reserve near Mkuze took careful note as a group of nine Amur Falcons took off from a power line and flew off towards the west. As they gained altitude they changed direction sharply to the north.

Later that same afternoon, hundreds of the species were noticed by Annette Gerber gathered on power lines along the eastern shores of Lake St Lucia. “There were so many of them that I stopped my car to watch. And then, whoosh… they suddenly took off as one – as if a switch had been flicked. The air was full of falcons flying northwards,” she said.

Gerber said a group of visitors from Cape Vidal stopped next to her and reported they had also seen a group of about 300 Amur falcons flying north.

What they were witnessing was the start of one of the longest migrations in the world by a raptor species – an amazing 15 000km journey from Africa to northern China and south-eastern Siberia.

David Allan, the curator of birds at the Durban Natural Science Museum, said there were quite a few bird species that gathered in large numbers, often quite vocally, before migration.

While the precise triggering mechanisms remained a mystery, Allan said there seemed to be a social element of group decision-making before migration.

“You don’t want to be the first to leave in case you get your timing wrong. So maybe they think it is better to ‘follow the herd’.”

Allan said one of the critical cues seemed to be the shorter hours of daylight as [southern hemisphere] winter approached, rather than a sudden change in temperature.

However, weather conditions were also likely to play a part as the birds would try to avoid flying into strong headwinds. After leaving South Africa, the falcons fly northwards along the east coast of Africa to Somalia. From there they turn sharply east to cross the ocean between Africa and India. On this stage they have to fly non-stop for two to three days without rest.

Allan said some researchers had suggested that their migration coincided with a similar migration by dragonflies – allowing the falcons to snatch a bit of “padkos” en route.

Allan said Belgian bird expert Marc Herrimans had studied red-backed shrikes in Botswana several years ago and noticed that more than 90% of these birds departed on one particular night, a remarkable observation as shrikes were not a social species.

While the journey from South Africa to China can take two to three weeks, with short feeding stops along the way, German bird researcher Prof Bernd Meyburg has also reported the case of a satellite-tagged Amur falcon female that flew non-stop from Somalia to Mongolia in five days.

Red-tailed hawks in Cornell, USA, first egg


This video from the USA about red-tailed hawks says about itself:

CornellRTHA Cam ‘Finally We Have First Egg of 2015 11:38 am

28 March 2015

Hooray! We have the first egg of 2015. BR revealed the egg @ approximately 11:38 am. Congratulations to BR & EZ.

You can see it as she turns about 2:50 minutes in the video.

Camera Host: Cornell Lab of Ornithology

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

First Egg of the Year for Cornell Hawks

Big Red laid her first egg this year on March 28, 2015, just before 12:00 P.M. EDT. The new nest is not on the same light pole as last year; Big Red and Ezra renovated the nest at the pole where they nested in 2012. We should expect a possible second egg in the next 2–3 days, if previous seasons are anything to go by, and then maybe a third 2–3 days after that. Meanwhile, Ezra will continue to bring food for Big Red as incubation continues. Don’t miss a thing! Watch live now.

Cornell Hawks Live Chat

The live chat on the Cornell Hawks cam will launch in the coming weeks. We’re excited to share that this year we will be using a new pop-out chat tool called Chatroll to increase stability and chat performance. Until chat opens, and throughout the season, we welcome you to leave comments in the News section of the website or, if you have a Twitter account, you can also ask questions by tweeting @cornellhawks. Looking forward to another season!

English Derby Cathedral peregrine falcons’ first egg


This video from Britain is called Derby Cathedral, 3rd egg for the Peregrine Falcons. 02 04 2014.

From the Derby Telegraph in England:

Derby Cathedral’s famous falcons lay their first egg

By Caroline Jones

Posted: March 29, 2015

WEBCAM viewers have all over the world watched as Derby Cathedral’s famous peregrine falcons laid their first egg of the year.

It is the 10th year this pair of peregrines has nested on the 16th-century tower of the cathedral.

The egg was laid at 2.12pm today.

“The first egg this year is the 36th that the female has laid. We expect that she will lay a further three eggs to complete her clutch.”

He said: “Eggs are usually laid at about two day intervals and incubation, which will last 30-35 days, begins only when the clutch is complete.

Peregrines don’t breed until they are at least two or three years old, so our pair are now over 12 years old. They certainly make excellent parents.

“They begin courting in February each year with the first egg being laid either in late March or early April. The earliest egg was laid on March 23 2010, the latest on April 4 2013. This year she has laid on the same day as she did last year”.

The Derby Cathedral Peregrine Project is managed by Derbyshire Wildlife Trust in partnership with Derby Cathedral, Derby City Council (who host the web cams) and Cathedral Quarter.

Goshawk versus buzzard, video


This video is about a goshawk in the Netherlands, which has caught a wood pigeon and starts eating it.

However, then a buzzard arrives …

Michel Verhoeven made the video.