Syrian refugee artist donates work in Scotland


This video from England says about itself:

27 August 2014

‘Syria’s Apex Generation’, an exhibition featuring recent works by artists Nihad Al Turk, Abdul Karim Majdal Al-Beik, Othman Moussa, Mohannad Orabi, and Kais Salman. Curated by art historian and Ayyam Gallery Artistic Director Maymanah Farhat, the exhibition will spotlight a new school of Syrian painting in the midst of expansion despite the disintegration of the Damascus art scene, its original centre. This multi-venue group show will be held at Ayyam Gallery’s London location from 7 August until 12 September.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Syrian artist donates work to thank supporters

Thursday 23rd March 2017

A SYRIAN artist who came to live in Scotland as a refugee has donated some of his work to a charity auction to thank those who helped him.

Nihad Al Turk, who had won awards for his artwork in Syria, came to Edinburgh in 2015 on the first flight for refugees from Lebanon.

With support from The Leith School of Art (LSA), Mr Al Turk created a mural to mark Refugee Week.

His work features mythological creatures, used as metaphors for his experiences of war in Syria.

Speaking through an interpreter, he said: “I worked hard for many years to build my career as an artist at home. But the war meant all that was lost and it became too dangerous to stay there.

“My aim is to start all over again and build my reputation in this new country that has been so kind to us.”

He has donated three works to an auction to raise funds for LSA outreach programmes.

Dutch painter Vermeer, new book


This 2001 video is called Vermeer: Master of Light (COMPLETE Documentary).

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Saturday 18th March 2017

IN HIS relatively short life — he died in 1675 at the age of 43 — Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer was unknown outside his native country and his name faded into obscurity after his death.

That changed in the mid-19th century, when his paintings of domestic interior scenes of middle-class life grew in popularity in Europe and, eventually, internationally.

Vermeer was not a prolific painter — only 34 canvases are directly attributed to him today — because he worked slowly and meticulously.

He was by no means wealthy and the pigments he used were expensive and this is possibly a reason why his works are few in number.

Almost all his paintings appear to be set in two rooms in his house and feature the same furniture and decorations and very often the same people, usually women.

Taschen publishers are noted for the quality of their art books and that is again in evidence in the newly and sumptuously produced Vermeer: The Complete Works (£25).

It draws on the complete catalogue of his output, with the images accompanied by a detailed and informative commentary.

The quality of the reproductions are such that Vermeer’s extraordinary representation of light shines through on every page and close-ups of selected canvases enhance one of the great pleasures of observing Vermeer’s work — constructing one’s own narrative about his subjects.

The book is a fitting tribute to a painter acknowledged as one of the greats of the Dutch “golden age.”

COMPETITION

Win a copy of Vermeer: The Complete Works. The Morning Star has a copy of Vermeer: The Complete Works to give away as a prize. All you have to do is name Vermeer’s birthplace and send your answer on a postcard to Vermeer Competition, 52 Beachy Road, London E3 2NS or by email to dawnpower@peoples-press.com. Please ensure you include your full name and address with your answer.

Closing date: Saturday March 25, 2017

Chilean mural art history


This video says about itself:

18 March 2017

The Chilean murals of the Brigada Ramona Parra remind us of lessons past and of those who stood up to imperialism and demanded a better life for the Chilean people.

Dutch museum buys Van Doesburg painting


Theo van Doesburg, Contra-Compositie VII

Translated from Dutch NOS TV today:

Museum De Lakenhal in Leiden has purchased the painting Contra-Composition VII by Theo van Doesburg. The museum paid nearly 1.9 million euros at an auction in London.

Van Doesburg painted Contra-Composition VII in 1924 in Paris, during the heyday of De Stijl. The abstract work according to De Lakenhal is a striking example of the art movement.

“In the painting one can clearly see the influence of Piet Mondrian, with whom Van Doesburg after settling in Paris in October 1923 interacted intensively for a short period. …

Leiden

Meta Knol, director of the Leiden museum, is very happy with the purchase. From 1916 to 1921 Van Doesburg lived in Leiden. He developed his avant-garde art there and founded the magazine De Stijl, for which the art movement is named.

Until now only five abstract paintings by Van Doesburg from the 1920s could be seen in Dutch museums. Many paintings from that time were sold by his widow in the 1940s to museums and collectors in the United States. Contra-Composition VII was one of them.

The Lakenhal is closed until the spring of 2019 because of a major renovation. Contra-Composition VII therefore is temporarily hanging in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

The painting is 45.5 by 45.5cm.

Bird paintings by Aert Schouman exhibited


This 17 February 2017 Dutch video is about an exhibition in Dordrecht of bird paintings by Aert Schouman (1710-1792).

Among his works are big oil paintings for the walls of Prince William V‘s palace in The Hague.

Now, these paintings are usually in Huis ten Bosch royal palace in The Hague. However, that palace is being reconstructed (which costs lots of taxpayers’ money). So, from now till September 2017, there is an exhibition of Schouman’s work in the Dordrechts Museum in Dordrecht.

Biologists have helped with this exhibition as the birds depicted are from many countries and Schouman often did not know which exact species he depicted.

Miffy the rabbit artist Dick Bruna, RIP


This video says about itself:

Farmer John • Miffy Classics

17 February 2017

Farmer John is plantings seeds. The hungry birds are eating all his seeds. He is angry and makes a scarecrow to scare them of. After a while the seeds turn into beautiful blue flowers. He also makes a birdhouse. Now he can enjoy his flowers and the birds eating the seeds he gives them.

From the Daily Mirror in Britain:

Dick Bruna dead: Creator of cartoon rabbit Miffy dies in his sleep after selling 80 million books

Bruna began his career as an illustrator of covers for books including Ian Fleming‘s James Bond series and the Inspector Maigret thrillers of Georges Simenon

By Thomas Escrit

14:07, 17 FEB 2017

Dick Bruna, the children’s author and artist who created the cartoon white rabbit Miffy, has died aged 89.

Bruna, who sold more than 80 million Miffy books, died in his sleep last night in his hometown of Utrecht, his publisher said in a statement.

Bruna created the character to entertain his infant son after seeing a rabbit in the dunes while on a seaside holiday.

He went on to relate the giant-eared, orange-pullovered bunny’s adventures in dozens of books sold worldwide.

Born in 1929 into a family of publishers, Bruna began his career as an illustrator of covers for books including Ian Fleming’s James Bond series and the Inspector Maigret thrillers of Georges Simenon.

Miffy, known as Nijntje in Dutch, was his best known creation, enjoying great popularity in Asia and adorning lunchboxes the world over.

Cuban art exhibition in London


This video from England says about itself:

14 February 2017

The ¡Presente! exhibition gathered, for the first time in London, the work of over 30 contemporary Cuban artists. With curators and artists from the island visiting the city, it also represented an opportunity for conversation and exchange on arts, culture and education.