New Bernie Sanders posters, limited edition available


Freedom is a strong seed planted in a great need

This poster is one of ten new posters of the presidential election campaign of Bernie Sanders in the USA. The caption of this poster is “Freedom is a strong seed planted in a great need” – a quote by African American poet Langston Hughes.

From the Sanders campaign:

Limited edition: 10 poster collection.

The art of a political revolution

Shop now for the limited edition poster collection at the Bernie Store, here.

Roman shipwreck discovery in Mediterranean


This video says about itself:

Divers Discovered a Spectacular, Ancient and Important Cargo of a Shipwreck – Caesarea

16 May 2016

Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists diving in the ancient harbor in the Caesarea National Park recovered beautiful statues, thousands of coins 1,600 years old and other finds from the seabed. This is the largest assemblage of marine artifacts to be recovered in the past thirty years.

From the Israel Antiquities Authority:

Divers Discovered a Spectacular, Ancient and Important Cargo of a Shipwreck

Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists diving in the ancient harbor in the Caesarea National Park recovered beautiful statues, thousands of coins 1,600 years old and other finds from the seabed.

A fortuitous discovery by two divers in the ancient port of Caesarea in the Caesarea National Park before the Passover holiday led to the exposure of a large, spectacular and beautiful ancient marine cargo of a merchant ship that sank during the Late Roman period 1,600 years ago.

As soon as they emerged from the water divers Ran Feinstein and Ofer Ra‘anan of Ra‘anana contacted the Israel Antiquities Authority and reported the discovery and removal of several ancient items from the sea.

A joint dive at the site together with IAA archaeologists revealed that an extensive portion of the seabed had been cleared of sand and the remains of a ship were left uncovered on the sea bottom: iron anchors, remains of wooden anchors and items that were used in the construction and running of the sailing vessel. An underwater salvage survey conducted in recent weeks with the assistance of many divers from the Israel Antiquities Authority and volunteers using advanced equipment discovered numerous items that were part of the ship’s cargo.

Many of the artifacts are bronze and in an extraordinary state of preservation: a bronze lamp depicting the image of the sun god Sol, a figurine of the moon goddess Luna, a lamp in the image of the head of an African slave, fragments of three life-size bronze cast statues, objects fashioned in the shape of animals such as a whale, a bronze faucet in the form of a wild boar with a swan on its head, etc. In addition, fragments of large jars were found that were used for carrying drinking water for the crew in the ship and for transportation at sea. One of the biggest surprises in particular was the discovery of two metallic lumps composed of thousands of coins weighing c. 20 kilograms which was in the form of the pottery vessel in which they were transported.

This discovery comes a year after the exposure of a treasure of gold Fatimid coins by divers and the Israel Antiquities Authority, which is currently on display for the public in the “Time Travel” presentations in the Caesarea harbor.

According to Jacob Sharvit, director of the Marine Archaeology Unit of the Israel Antiquities Authority and Dror Planer, deputy director of the unit, “These are extremely exciting finds, which apart from their extraordinary beauty, are of historical significance. The location and distribution of the ancient finds on the seabed indicate that a large merchant ship was carrying a cargo of metal slated recycling, which apparently encountered a storm at the entrance to the harbor and drifted until it smashed into the seawall and the rocks”. A preliminary study of the iron anchors suggests there was an attempt to stop the drifting vessel before it reached shore by casting anchors into the sea; however, these broke – evidence of the power of the waves and the wind which the ship was caught up in”. Sharvit and Planer stress, “A marine assemblage such as this has not been found in Israel in the past thirty years. Metal statues are rare archaeological finds because they were always melted down and recycled in antiquity. When we find bronze artifacts it usually occurs at sea. Because these statues were wrecked together with the ship, they sank in the water and were thus ‘saved’ from the recycling process”. Sharvit and Planer added, “In the many marine excavations that have been carried out in Caesarea only very small number of bronze statues have been found, whereas in the current cargo a wealth of spectacular statues were found that were in the city and were removed from it by way of sea. The sand protected the statues; consequently they are in an amazing state of preservation – as though they were cast yesterday rather than 1,600 years ago”. The coins that were discovered bear the image of the emperor Constantine who ruled the Western Roman Empire (312–324 CE) and was later known as Constantine the Great, ruler of the Roman Empire (324–337 CE), and of Licinius, an emperor who ruled the eastern part of the Roman Empire and was a rival of Constantine, until his downfall in a battle that was waged between the two rulers.

According [to] Sharvit and Planer, “The range of finds recovered from the sea reflects the large volume of trade and the status of Caesarea’s harbor during this time, which was known as period of economic and commercial stability in the wake of the stability of the Roman Empire. The crew of the shipwreck lived in a fascinating time in history that greatly influenced humanity – the period when Christianity was on its way to becoming the official religion of the Roman Empire. It was at this time that Emperor Constantine put a halt to the policy of persecuting Christians, and the faithful in Caesarea, as well as elsewhere in the Roman Empire, were given the legitimacy to practice their belief through the famous Edict of Milan that proclaimed Christianity was no longer a banned religion.”

Easter Island sculpture, by David Attenborough


This video from Britain says about itself:

Where Did The Easter Island Statues Come From? – #Attenborough90

7 May 2016

Sir David Attenborough looked into the history of the statues on the remote Easter Island to discover how these astonishing monuments were first created.

After Dutch museum, Ukrainian criminals rob Italian museum


Painting Vrouw Wereld, by Jacob Waben

This picture shows part of the painting Vrouw Wereld, made by Dutch painter Jacob Waben in 1622. One of 24 ancient paintings (including work by, eg Jan van Goyen) and much silver, stolen in 2005 from the Westfries Museum in the Netherlands.

Dutch NOS TV scheme of the Ukrainian culprits in the Westfries Museum art robbery

This Dutch NOS TV scheme shows the network of the Ukrainian culprits in the Westfries Museum art robbery; like Oleh Yaroslavovych Tyahnybok of the neo-nazi Svoboda party; Valentyn Oleksandrovych Nalyvaichenko, until recently the boss of the Ukrainian secret police, now a right-wing member of parliament; and Borys Humeniuk, commander of the OUN extreme right paramilitary gang. This OUN has the same name as an organisation collaborating with Hitler during the nazi occupation, led by Stepan Bandera.

The Westfries Museum and the Dutch government asked the Ukrainian government to return the stolen art and arrest the culprits. However, for a long time nothing happened, as the suspects were part of the political establishment in Ukraine. After much pressure, including the referendum on 6 April 2016, in which nearly two-thirds of Dutch voters rejected the European Union-Ukraine trade deal, suddenly something did happen: it was said four of the 24 stolen paintings would be returned to the Netherlands.

Now, it turns out something similar to what happened to the Westfries Museum happened to an Italian museum.

Sacra famiglia con una santa by Andrea Mantegna, one of the paintings stolen from the museum in Verona

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Stolen paintings from museum in Verona found in Ukraine

Today, 22:01

In Ukraine 17 paintings have been recovered that were a few months ago stolen from the Museo Castelvecchio in Verona. Among the paintings are works by Peter Paul Rubens and Jacopo Tintoretto.

The works have an estimated value of at least 15 million euros. They were found on an island in a river between Ukraine and Moldova. They were, eg, inside plastic bags.

How the police has been able to track the art is not clear, and as far as is known no one has been arrested.

Why is this so unclear, and why has not anyone been arrested?

Because maybe the suspects were once again Mr Oleh Yaroslavovych Tyahnybok of the Svoboda party, and ex-secret police boss Mr Valentyn Oleksandrovych Nalyvaichenko, or similar Ukrainian establishment people?

The paintings were stolen in November last year. Three armed and masked men entered then shortly after closing time invaded the museum and overpowered the guard and a cashier who were still in the building.

… The police soon after the robbery suspected that the perpetrators had acted on the instructions of higher-ups and that the paintings were smuggled to Eastern Europe.

Another painting stolen from the museum in Verona

Indonesian rhino poacher becomes pro-rhino conservation wood carver


Sumatran rhino carving

From the International Rhino Foundation about this:

Wooden Sumatran Rhino

Hand-carved by a former poacher who now works in collaboration with our Rhino Protection Units to save Sumatran rhinos in Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park.

Each statue is 6″ tall x 9.5″long x 3.75″ deep.

Hieronymus Bosch exhibition, last weekend


This video says about itself:

30 November 2015

Het Noordbrabants Museum presents: Jheronimus Bosch – Visions of a genius. From 13th February to 8th May. Twenty panels and triptychs and nineteen drawings are making it the largest exhibition of Hieronymus Bosch in the Netherlands ever. The exhibition is a highpoint of the National Event Year Jheronimus Bosch 500 in 2016.

That exhibition of works by the famous painter Hieronymus Bosch in Den Bosch, the city where he lived, in the Netherlands, is almost over. This weekend is the last weekend.

Dutch NOS TV reports today that about 400,000 tickets were sold, to visitors from 81 countries.

About 25% of all visitors were from foreign countries. Most from Belgium (7%), Germany (6%) and Britain (4%). Also from countries like South Africa, the USA, Argentina, China and Russia.