Graphic novel on history of protests in English-speaking countries


This music video from the USA says about itself:

Public Enemy – Fight The Power (Full 7 Min. Version)

From 1990 Album: “Fear Of A Black Planet“. Song first appeared on the 1989 Soundtrack: “Do The Right Thing”.

By Michal Boncza in Britain:

Framed for posterity

Tuesday 3rd March 2015

Fight The Power, a history of popular struggle globally, makes highly effective use of the graphic novel format, says MICHAL BONCZA

Fight The Power: A Visual History of Protest Among English-speaking Peoples, by Sean Michael Wilson, Benjamin Dickson, Hunt Emerson, John Spelling and Adam Pasion (New Internationalist, £9.99)

“FIRST they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you and then you win,” Mahatma Gandhi once remarked about political struggle.

His words come to mind when reading this inspiring book in the graphic novel format, particularly in a period when there’s a dearth of epoch-defining popular struggles in the Anglo-Saxon world. It’s a salutary reminder of what has been achieved so far but which is often and unwisely taken for granted.

Gandhi’s words about the protracted and open-ended nature of struggle are borne out in all the histories recorded here.

As early as 1776 the founding fathers of the US bestowed on its citizenry the largely nominal right to dissent. But it was exercised to spectacular political effect by Rosa Parks in 1955, when she stood up to bus segregation, kick-starting the historic civil rights protests.

In New Lanark in 1817, the socialist Robert Owen propagated a day divided into three eight-hour periods of work, recreation and rest — it would, however, take well over a century for this goal to be achieved.

Other histories include the Peterloo massacre, rebellions in Ireland, the Suffragette movement, the trial of Nelson Mandela and the 1990 poll tax riots.

The concise graphic novel narrative makes each story easy to grasp and as such the book is an ideal teaching aid for the history curriculum in schools or further education colleges.

Graphic novels resemble film shorts where frame management and composition is as important, if not more so, than the words in speech bubbles.

It is the harmonious balance of the two that impacts and Hunt Emerson is in a class of his own in his work on the Luddites, the Swing Riots and Fragging, the practice of enlisted men shooting superior officers which was so prevalent during the Vietnam war.

His attention to detail within the rigorous demands of the larger tableaux, the organisation of movement and a mesmerising ability to render emotions both individual and collective, along with the textures and vigour of line, are outstanding.

In The Battle of Toledo and The Trial of Nelson Mandela, John Spelling’s sparser composition records the action news-camera style, with sudden changes of angles, unexpected “freeze” frames and long-shots that are real page-turners. The sketchbook drawing style aptly mimics the dynamism of those pivotal events.

They’re typical of the stimulating work throughout the book, which is well worth snapping up.

Rembrandt exhibition in Amsterdam, and also online


This Dutch video is about the ‘Late Rembrandt’ exhibition in Amsterdam; also visible on the Internet.

From the Rijksmuseum site in the Netherlands:

A once-in-a lifetime exhibition

Discover ‘Late Rembrandt’ online

The Rijksmuseum is holding a truly impressive retrospective of Rembrandt’s later works until 17 May 2015. Since everyone should have the chance to experience this, KPN, the main sponsor for the Rijksmuseum and this exhibition, is making it possible to discover this spectacular exhibition online – wherever and whenever you want. Join the guided tours given by Dutch celebrities.

Watch the online tours here.

Rembrandt, new Internet site


This video says about itself:

The complete life of the painter Rembrandt van Rijn

14 July 2014

A documentary which unlocks Rembrandt to a large public. Trough his documentary we travel for 53 minutes together with Rembrandt in a geographical reconstruction of his life. The documentary shows beautiful pictures of which Rembrandt has drawn his inspiration. A lot of the buildings from Rembrandt`s days still exist. Trough modern digital techniques we change, where possible, the current image into the painting that the artist has made for over 400 years ago or into old pictures of those times.

From the Rembench site in the Netherlands:

A Digital Workbench for Rembrandt Research

RemBench is an integrated online work environment that enables research about the life and works of Rembrandt van Rijn. We brought together four existing databases and disclosed them through one search interface. Our target groups are historians, art historians and other humanities scholars and students.

The four databases that have been integrated by RemBench are:

RemBench is funded as part of the CLARIN-NL programme and was developed by Huygens ING in collaboration with Radboud University Nijmegen and RKD. It is a demo application, intended to serve as an example of the possibilities of digitized historical data. The data reside in their original databases; RemBench provides access to them.

For any questions about RemBench, you can contact Suzan Verberne, s.verberne@let.ru.nl

For a short introduction to RemBench see this instructional video.

That video is here (scroll down).

There is also another video, this one:

That video says about itself:

12 June 2014

An example of a user interacting with RemBench, an integrated working environment for Rembrandt research.

Albert Einstein visual arts exhibition


This is a video about a 2008 exhibition in the Lakenhal and Boerhaave museums in Leiden, the Netherlands about the Kamerlingh Onnes family. Some people in that family were physicists (with a special interest in cold temperatures), some were visual artists.

Albert Einstein, 1920 drawing by Harm Kamerlingh Onnes

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Albert Einstein in Leiden museum

Today, 19:23

Leiden artist Harm Kamerlingh Onnes (1893-1985) has portrayed twenty renowned scholars in the years when they visited his uncle, the Nobel Prize winner Heike Kamerlingh Onnes. Among them was Albert Einstein. Boerhaave Museum in Leiden has now acquired these sketches and drawings. The majority was not known until now.

Harm was in 1920 and 1921 also regularly found in the laboratory of his uncle Heike, who was doing research on absolute zero temperature (-273 ° C). He made portraits and recorded how his uncle and staff were busy with their experiments.

Houseguests

The physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes received the Nobel Prize in 1913. In his Leiden home, Huize ter Wetering at the Galgewater, at that time many foreign guests visited.

The house was a meeting place for scholars and artists, including Marie Curie, Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr. They met there Dutch artists like Jan Toorop, Albert Verwey and Carel Lion Cachet.

Exhibition

The collection of drawings is from the estate of a son of Harm Kamerlingh Onnes. A selection will be on show from 21 February until 26 April at the Museum Boerhaave in Leiden. About the family of scientists and artists an accompanying booklet has been published with the title Koude, kunst, Kamerlingh Onnes [Cold, art, Kamerlingh Onnes], written by Dirk van Delft.

See also here. And here.

Leiden botanical garden celebrates its 425 years


This June 2012 video is about the Hortus Botanicus in Leiden, the Netherlands.

And this video is the sequel.

From the botanical garden in Leiden, the Netherlands, on 3 February 2015:

Jubilee: 425 years of the Hortus botanicus Leiden

In 2015 we will be celebrating the foundation, in 1590, of the Hortus botanicus Leiden. We are proud that the garden is still on its original site, and that we are still an academic garden, a place where visitors can enjoy and learn about the plants but where scientific research is also important. We have planted 30,000 extra bulbs to celebrate this Jubilee.

Read more here about the Hortus now and in the past.

Take a walk with Clusius

Carolus Clusius (1526-1609), the very first prefect (director) of the Hortus, already had tulips and tomatoes growing in the garden; Leiden was the starting point for the tulip’s ‘conquest of the world’. Please ask at the admissions desk if you would like a guidebook for a walk past our magnificent display of spring flowers. Available from February to May.

Botanical art

Anita Walsmit Sachs regularly provides botanical drawing courses in the Hortus, and by popular demand she will be giving lessons in English in April 2015. Be sure to register on time, as there is always a lot of interest in the botanical drawing courses.

English walking tour

On eight different dates this summer you will be able to take a walking tour of the garden with an English-speaking guide. These provide a wonderful opportunity to learn more about the history of the Hortus and about the ‘jewels in our crown’. These tours start at 11:00 on: 02.07, 09.07, 16.07, 23.07, 30.07, 06.08, 13.08, 20.08, 27.08. Fee €1.50 plus entrance to the garden. No need to book, just come along.