Bird paintings by Aert Schouman exhibited


This 17 February 2017 Dutch video is about an exhibition in Dordrecht of bird paintings by Aert Schouman (1710-1792).

Among his works are big oil paintings for the walls of Prince William V‘s palace in The Hague.

Now, these paintings are usually in Huis ten Bosch royal palace in The Hague. However, that palace is being reconstructed (which costs lots of taxpayers’ money). So, from now till September 2017, there is an exhibition of Schouman’s work in the Dordrechts Museum in Dordrecht.

Biologists have helped with this exhibition as the birds depicted are from many countries and Schouman often did not know which exact species he depicted.

Miffy the rabbit artist Dick Bruna, RIP


This video says about itself:

Farmer John • Miffy Classics

17 February 2017

Farmer John is plantings seeds. The hungry birds are eating all his seeds. He is angry and makes a scarecrow to scare them of. After a while the seeds turn into beautiful blue flowers. He also makes a birdhouse. Now he can enjoy his flowers and the birds eating the seeds he gives them.

From the Daily Mirror in Britain:

Dick Bruna dead: Creator of cartoon rabbit Miffy dies in his sleep after selling 80 million books

Bruna began his career as an illustrator of covers for books including Ian Fleming‘s James Bond series and the Inspector Maigret thrillers of Georges Simenon

By Thomas Escrit

14:07, 17 FEB 2017

Dick Bruna, the children’s author and artist who created the cartoon white rabbit Miffy, has died aged 89.

Bruna, who sold more than 80 million Miffy books, died in his sleep last night in his hometown of Utrecht, his publisher said in a statement.

Bruna created the character to entertain his infant son after seeing a rabbit in the dunes while on a seaside holiday.

He went on to relate the giant-eared, orange-pullovered bunny’s adventures in dozens of books sold worldwide.

Born in 1929 into a family of publishers, Bruna began his career as an illustrator of covers for books including Ian Fleming’s James Bond series and the Inspector Maigret thrillers of Georges Simenon.

Miffy, known as Nijntje in Dutch, was his best known creation, enjoying great popularity in Asia and adorning lunchboxes the world over.

Cuban art exhibition in London


This video from England says about itself:

14 February 2017

The ¡Presente! exhibition gathered, for the first time in London, the work of over 30 contemporary Cuban artists. With curators and artists from the island visiting the city, it also represented an opportunity for conversation and exchange on arts, culture and education.

Dog drawing by Rembrandt discovery


Dog, by Rembrandt

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Drawing of dog turns out to be real Rembrandt

Today, 12:49

A chalk drawing of a dog which had been in possession of a German museum for centuries appears to be the work of Rembrandt van Rijn. International experts confirm that. “It’s 110 percent Rembrandt“, said the Dutch Rembrandt expert Peter Schatborn.

The Herzog Anton Ulrich Museum in Braunschweig has had the drawing in their collection since about 1770. Until now it was considered to be a work by the German artist Johann Melchior Roos. …

Schatborn calls it a nice addition to the known works of the Dutch master. “There are of course some 700 drawings by Rembrandt. It is special if there is found something new by such an old master.” He says it’s one of the few drawings which Rembrandt made of dogs.

Hieronymus Bosch exhibition gets award


This 25 September 2015 video from the Prado museum in Spain is called Bosch. The Centenary exhibition.

The 2016 exhibition commemorating that Dutch visual artist Hieronymus Bosch had died 500 years ago has won the Global Fine Art Award in the category Best Renaissance, Baroque, Old Masters, Dynasties – solo artist.

The Noordbrabants Museum in the Netherlands and the Prado museum in Spain had organized this exhibition jointly.

Ice library built in Siberia


This video says about itself:

5 February 2017

‘The Ice Library of Wonders’, which consists of 420 “books” on a 200 ton ice sculpture on the coast of Lake Baikal, in Baikalsk, Russia, was unveiled on Sunday.

The walls of the structure are formed from ice blocks, with etchings of more than 1,000 short phrases forming a labyrinth. People from all over the world submitted their dreams online to be carved into the ice, in various languages including English, Chinese, Korean, and Russian.

The library on Baikal is expected to stand until April, and then it’s going to melt.

Ancient Stone Age aurochs depiction discovery


A 38,000-year-old engraved stone (left), depicting an aurochs, or wild cow, covered with dots, was unearthed at a French rock-shelter. Symbolic elements of Europe’s earliest human culture appear in the engraving, its discoverers say. Drawings of the find (center) and of the aurochs separated from the dots show the scene more clearly. P. Jugie/Musée National de Préhistoire (photo), R. Bourrillon et al/Quaternary International 2017

From Science News:

Cow carved in stone paints picture of Europe’s early human culture

Symbolic dots, style link 38,000-year-old engraving to other famous cave art finds

By Bruce Bower

7:00am, February 3, 2017

This stone engraving of an aurochs, or wild cow, found in a French rock-shelter in 2012, provides glimpses of an ancient human culture’s spread across Central and Western Europe, researchers say.

Rows of dots partly cover the aurochs. A circular depression cut into the center of the animal’s body may have caused the limestone to split in two, says Stone Age art specialist Raphaëlle Bourrillon of the University of Toulouse-Jean Jaurès in France. Radiocarbon dating of animal bones unearthed near the discovery at Abri Blanchard rock-shelter put the engraving’s age at roughly 38,000 years, Bourrillon and colleagues report online January 24 in Quaternary International.

The rock art is similar to some engravings and drawings found at other French and German sites, including the famous Chauvet Cave (SN: 6/30/12, p. 12), and attributed to the Aurignacian culture, which dates to between 43,000 and 33,000 years ago. Like the new find, that art includes rows of dots, depictions of aurochs and various animals shown in profile with a single horn and a long, thin muzzle.

Within a few thousand years of arriving in Europe from Africa, Aurignacian groups developed regional styles of artwork based on images that had deep meaning for all of them, proposes anthropologist and study coauthor Randall White of New York University, who directed the excavation.