Rembrandt exhibition in Amsterdam, and also online


This Dutch video is about the ‘Late Rembrandt’ exhibition in Amsterdam; also visible on the Internet.

From the Rijksmuseum site in the Netherlands:

A once-in-a lifetime exhibition

Discover ‘Late Rembrandt’ online

The Rijksmuseum is holding a truly impressive retrospective of Rembrandt’s later works until 17 May 2015. Since everyone should have the chance to experience this, KPN, the main sponsor for the Rijksmuseum and this exhibition, is making it possible to discover this spectacular exhibition online – wherever and whenever you want. Join the guided tours given by Dutch celebrities.

Watch the online tours here.

Rembrandt, new Internet site


This video says about itself:

The complete life of the painter Rembrandt van Rijn

14 July 2014

A documentary which unlocks Rembrandt to a large public. Trough his documentary we travel for 53 minutes together with Rembrandt in a geographical reconstruction of his life. The documentary shows beautiful pictures of which Rembrandt has drawn his inspiration. A lot of the buildings from Rembrandt`s days still exist. Trough modern digital techniques we change, where possible, the current image into the painting that the artist has made for over 400 years ago or into old pictures of those times.

From the Rembench site in the Netherlands:

A Digital Workbench for Rembrandt Research

RemBench is an integrated online work environment that enables research about the life and works of Rembrandt van Rijn. We brought together four existing databases and disclosed them through one search interface. Our target groups are historians, art historians and other humanities scholars and students.

The four databases that have been integrated by RemBench are:

RemBench is funded as part of the CLARIN-NL programme and was developed by Huygens ING in collaboration with Radboud University Nijmegen and RKD. It is a demo application, intended to serve as an example of the possibilities of digitized historical data. The data reside in their original databases; RemBench provides access to them.

For any questions about RemBench, you can contact Suzan Verberne, s.verberne@let.ru.nl

For a short introduction to RemBench see this instructional video.

That video is here (scroll down).

There is also another video, this one:

That video says about itself:

12 June 2014

An example of a user interacting with RemBench, an integrated working environment for Rembrandt research.

Albert Einstein visual arts exhibition


This is a video about a 2008 exhibition in the Lakenhal and Boerhaave museums in Leiden, the Netherlands about the Kamerlingh Onnes family. Some people in that family were physicists (with a special interest in cold temperatures), some were visual artists.

Albert Einstein, 1920 drawing by Harm Kamerlingh Onnes

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Albert Einstein in Leiden museum

Today, 19:23

Leiden artist Harm Kamerlingh Onnes (1893-1985) has portrayed twenty renowned scholars in the years when they visited his uncle, the Nobel Prize winner Heike Kamerlingh Onnes. Among them was Albert Einstein. Boerhaave Museum in Leiden has now acquired these sketches and drawings. The majority was not known until now.

Harm was in 1920 and 1921 also regularly found in the laboratory of his uncle Heike, who was doing research on absolute zero temperature (-273 ° C). He made portraits and recorded how his uncle and staff were busy with their experiments.

Houseguests

The physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes received the Nobel Prize in 1913. In his Leiden home, Huize ter Wetering at the Galgewater, at that time many foreign guests visited.

The house was a meeting place for scholars and artists, including Marie Curie, Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr. They met there Dutch artists like Jan Toorop, Albert Verwey and Carel Lion Cachet.

Exhibition

The collection of drawings is from the estate of a son of Harm Kamerlingh Onnes. A selection will be on show from 21 February until 26 April at the Museum Boerhaave in Leiden. About the family of scientists and artists an accompanying booklet has been published with the title Koude, kunst, Kamerlingh Onnes [Cold, art, Kamerlingh Onnes], written by Dirk van Delft.

See also here. And here.

Leiden botanical garden celebrates its 425 years


This June 2012 video is about the Hortus Botanicus in Leiden, the Netherlands.

And this video is the sequel.

From the botanical garden in Leiden, the Netherlands, on 3 February 2015:

Jubilee: 425 years of the Hortus botanicus Leiden

In 2015 we will be celebrating the foundation, in 1590, of the Hortus botanicus Leiden. We are proud that the garden is still on its original site, and that we are still an academic garden, a place where visitors can enjoy and learn about the plants but where scientific research is also important. We have planted 30,000 extra bulbs to celebrate this Jubilee.

Read more here about the Hortus now and in the past.

Take a walk with Clusius

Carolus Clusius (1526-1609), the very first prefect (director) of the Hortus, already had tulips and tomatoes growing in the garden; Leiden was the starting point for the tulip’s ‘conquest of the world’. Please ask at the admissions desk if you would like a guidebook for a walk past our magnificent display of spring flowers. Available from February to May.

Botanical art

Anita Walsmit Sachs regularly provides botanical drawing courses in the Hortus, and by popular demand she will be giving lessons in English in April 2015. Be sure to register on time, as there is always a lot of interest in the botanical drawing courses.

English walking tour

On eight different dates this summer you will be able to take a walking tour of the garden with an English-speaking guide. These provide a wonderful opportunity to learn more about the history of the Hortus and about the ‘jewels in our crown’. These tours start at 11:00 on: 02.07, 09.07, 16.07, 23.07, 30.07, 06.08, 13.08, 20.08, 27.08. Fee €1.50 plus entrance to the garden. No need to book, just come along.

Mongolian emperors and Chinese art history


This video says about itself:

Kubla Khan by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, reading with text

9 February 2013

Kubla Khan (pron.: /ˌkʊblə ˈkɑːn/) is a poem written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, completed in 1797 and published in 1816. According to Coleridge‘s Preface to Kubla Khan, the poem was composed one night after he experienced an opium influenced dream after reading a work describing Xanadu, the summer palace of the Mongol ruler and Emperor of China Kublai Khan. Upon waking, he set about writing lines of poetry that came to him from the dream until he was interrupted by a person from Porlock. The poem could not be completed according to its original 200–300 line plan as the interruption caused him to forget the lines. He left it unpublished and kept it for private readings for his friends until 1816 when, on the prompting by George Gordon Byron, it was published.

Some of Coleridge’s contemporaries denounced the poem and questioned his story about its origin. It was not until years later that critics began to openly admire the poem. Most modern critics now view Kubla Khan as one of Coleridge’s three great poems, with The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Christabel. The poem is considered one of the most famous examples of Romanticism in English poetry. A copy of the manuscript is a permanent exhibit at the British Museum in London.

Apart from Coleridge’s poetic imagination, and descriptions by Marco Polo, there is more to say about Khubilai Khan and other Mongolian rulers of medieval China.

From the International Institute for Asian Studies in the Netherlands:

Khubilai Khan’s legacy: Inner Asian Influence on Chinese art

Date & time

19 February 2015, 14.30 – 16.30 hrs

Venue

Auditorium, Rijksmuseum
Museumstraat 1, Amsterdam

The programme

14.30 – 15.00 Reception with coffee & tea in the foyer at the Auditorium
15.00 – 15.10 Welcome & Introduction
15.10 – 16.00 Lecture by Professor Morris Rossabi
16.00 – 16.30 Q&A

The lecture

This slide-illustrated presentation challenges the conventional wisdom that portrays the thirteenth-century Mongolians as merely destroyers, killers, rapists, and plunderers. Although the lecture does not minimize the massacres and destruction wrought by the Mongolians, it also reveals their contributions to the arts and culture in China. Khubilai Khan, in particular, supported several of the most prominent Chinese painters, recruited Muslim weavers to add new motifs in Chinese textiles, appointed Mongolians to supervise the spectacular porcelain industry, and commissioned Tibetan and Nepalese painters and artisans to produce portraits of the Imperial family and to construct remarkable buildings in Dadu (or Beijing). Marco Polo, whose book introduced Khubilai to the West, was himself dazzled by the extraordinary art and culture he encountered in Mongol-ruled China.

To be sure, the Mongolians were not the artists and craftsmen, but they acted as sponsors, patrons, and consumers of the arts, thereby performing an invaluable service. Women, especially Khubilai’s wife and great granddaughter, were avid supporters of Chinese art.

The speaker

Morris Rossabi is a historian of China and Inner Asia who conducted his initial research on traditional Chinese foreign relations and on the peoples along China’s borders. He wrote a biography of Khubilai Khan, which has been translated in many languages, including Korean and Russian, and helped to organize exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco. He was commissioned to write three chapters for the Cambridge History of China. After serving as a Consultant for the Soros Foundation, he wrote the book Modern Mongolia. The author of numerous articles and speeches, he travels repeatedly to Central Asia and Mongolia, where he teaches courses on Mongolian and East Asian history.

Registration

Entrance and registration are free of charge. Please register via: h.m.van.der.minne@iias.nl

Contact

For enquiries about the lecture, please contact Ms Heleen van der Minne: h.m.van.der.minne@iias.nl.