Dutch cartoonist Peter van Straaten dies


Child abuse, cartoon by Peter van Straaten

This 2011 cartoon is by Peter van Straaten from the Netherlands. It is about sexual child abuse in the Roman Catholic church. It depicts a praying child, abused by a crucifix.

Peter van Straaten died this week, 81 years old.

Van Straaten said about some of the reactions to that cartoon:

I got a huge load of hate mail and even death threats. I’m not used to that at all, it really scared me. … But apparently there were a lot of outraged Catholics. On the advice of my wife, I even removed our nameplate from the front door.

Unknown Mondriaan painting discovered


Mondriaan's Landscape near Arnhem, photo Christiie's images limited

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Unknown Mondrian surfaces at auction

Today, 15:47

A ‘new’ Mondrian has surfaced at Christie’s auction house in Amsterdam. The work comes from private ownership and was hitherto unknown. The painting shows a landscape with in the distance Arnhem city, writes Omroep Gelderland.

Piet Mondrian painted the work in 1902 or 1903. The painting Landscape near Arnhem is not described in any catalog and has never previously hung in a museum.

According to art specialist Odette van Ginkel the owner does not know much about the origin and how it came into the family. Van Ginkel believes the painting was sold fairly quickly probably after it was finished. Possibly therefore it has never appeared in a catalog.

Authenticity

There is little or no doubt about the authenticity of the painting. Dutch Institute for Art History RKD and the The Hague Municipal Museum reviewed the work.

A similar work by Piet Mondrian is known, painted from the same spot on the north side of the capital of Gelderland.

Tuesday

The painting is now officially approved and will be listed in the next catalog of Mondrian‘s work. Which will come out next spring.

The painting is estimated to be sold at between 120,000 and 180,000 euros. The work will be auctioned Tuesday at Christie’s in Amsterdam.

Van Gogh watercolour bought by museum


Van Gogh's watercolour bought by museum

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Noordbrabants Museum buys watercolour by Van Gogh

Today, 10:11

The Noordbrabants Museum in Den Bosch has acquired a watercolour by Vincent Van Gogh. It is The garden of the parsonage in Nuenen, the last known watercolour he made in Nuenen in 1885. The museum calls the work its most important purchase ever; a price has not been mentioned. The watercolour is the first experiment by Van Gogh with walking figures and couples in a garden.

This Van Gogh work fits according to the Noordbrabants Museum in their ambition to show an overview of the Brabant period of the artist.

Van Gogh lived for over a year and half with his parents in the parsonage in Nuenen. He made several works in the garden of the rectory. The painting which the master made of the garden was lost in World War II, and is known only from black and white reproductions.

Private collection

The work was probably acquired in 1903 by art critic and art teacher Hendrik Bremmer, who later became adviser of Helene Kröller-Müller. After his death the work stayed in his family and in 1969 ended up in the private collection where the museum now has acquired it from.

Painter Hieronymus Bosch, new film


This video says about itself:

EXHIBITION ON SCREEN – The Curious World of Hieronymus Bosch

20 September 2016

IN CINEMAS FROM 3 NOVEMBER 2016

Delve into the vivid imagination of a true visionary.

Who was Hieronymus Bosch? Why do his strange and fantastical paintings resonate with art lovers now more than ever? How does he bridge the medieval and Renaissance worlds? Where did his unconventional and timeless creations come from? Discover the answers to these questions and more with this remarkable new film from EXHIBITION ON SCREEN.

The Curious World of Hieronymus Bosch features the critically acclaimed exhibition ‘Visions of a Genius’ at the Noordbrabants Museum in the southern Netherlands, which brought the majority of Bosch’s paintings and drawings together for the first time to his home town of ‘s-Hertogenbosch and attracted almost half a million art lovers from all over the world.

With his fascinating life revealed plus the details and stories within his works seen like never before, don’t miss this cinematic exploration of a great creative genius.

For more information go to www.exhibitiononscreen.com.

American artist’s post-Trump mural


Tatyana Fazlalizadeh and her mural

By Priscilla Frank, Arts Writer, The Huffington Post in the USA:

Street Artist Delivers Powerful Message To White America

“America is black. It is Native. It wears a hijab … “

11/29/2016 08:39 am ET | Updated 9 hours ago

Oklahoma has voted Republican in every presidential election since 1968, and this year’s result was no different. Donald Trump won 65.3 percent of the state’s vote.

A powerful work of public art mounted in Oklahoma City on Sunday addresses those who gave credence to the racist, xenophobic and misogynistic language that dominated the president-elect’s campaign.

The piece, by street artist Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, pays homage to black Americans, Muslim Americans, American women, Latino Americans, and American immigrants ― all the populations deemed “other” and so loudly forsaken by the dangerous rhetoric of Trump’s camp.

“After the election, I immediately knew I wanted to make some public art during my trip to Oklahoma in a few weeks for Thanksgiving,” the artist wrote in a comment in Instagram. “I wanted to make something in a very Republican state that was a challenge to whiteness. So, I used a couple of recent drawings, one old drawing, and a drawing I did the day before installing this of my mother, to put together a diverse group of folks.”

The piece reads: “America is black. It is Native. It wears a hijab. It is a Spanish speaking tongue. It is migrant. It is a woman. It is here. Has been here. And it’s not going anywhere.”

“This piece was done specifically to challenge whiteness and the accepted idea of who an American is,” Fazlalizadeh wrote in an email to The Huffington Post. “This work is located in Oklahoma, a very red, Republican state. The site of this piece is just as important to its intent. This work is declaring that people who are non-white and male are a part of this country, are integral to this country, and are not going anywhere.”

The election of Donald Trump has ignited incensed artists and writers around the country, turning creatives into activists. Fazlalizadeh, however, used her artistic prowess to fight social injustice long before Trump was announced president elect.

Fazlalizadeh is best known for her project “Stop Telling Women to Smile”, which highlighted and combated the gender-based street harassment endured by so many around the world. The public artworks juxtapose images of women with the words they wish they could lodge at those who catcalled them, including “My name is not Baby” and “Women are not outside for your entertainment.”

If you are in the Oklahoma City area and wish to see Fazlalizadeh’s work in person, don’t hesitate; the piece, installed using wheatpaste, is meant to be ephemeral. Given its public setting, it could also be subjected to vandalism or other visual reactions.

As many around the country fear for their futures under a leader whose definition of an American fails to include them, we look to artists like Fazlalizadeh to depict in simple and striking terms what it has always and will always mean to be an American.

Turkish cartoonist Musa Kart jailed


This 2011 video is an animated cartoon by Musa Kart, called (translated) If Einstein would teach in Turkey.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Cartoonists’ tribute to detained Turk

Thursday 24th November 2016

BRITISH cartoonists led by Martin Rowson gave a standing ovation in solidarity with detained Turkish cartoonist Musa Kart, who faces jail for sedition.

The tribute was paid on Tuesday night at the annual Cartoon Art Trust awards held at the Mall Galleries in central London.

British Cartoonists’ Association chairman Mr Rowson reminded the 160 people attending the awards dinner that at the end of a turbulent year for both Britain and the world, it was “more important than ever to fight for the freedom to laugh in order to stop us all going mad in the face of events.”

Mr Kart was among journalists from the opposition newspaper Cumhuriyet rounded up by the Turkish authorities last month accused of crimes in support of forces behind the July coup attempt against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

After paying tribute to the cartoonists murdered in the offices of Charlie Hebdo magazine, Mr Rowson told the audience of cartoonists, politicians, journalists and cartoon fans about the plight of Mr Kart, who faces up to 43 years in prison.

He then invited everyone to stand and applaud Mr Kart as an act of solidarity and support for “the twin freedoms of speech and laughter” — which the whole room did for several minutes.

Turkish officials initially reacted to Trump’s election by escalating the drive towards authoritarian forms of rule: here.