Vermeer’s Little Street painting, address found?

Vermeer's Little Street

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands today:

The original location of The Little Street by Johannes Vermeer appears to be at the Vlamingstraat 40-42 in Delft. Until now it was not clear where the famous painting was created. Frans Grijzenhout, Professor of Art History at the University of Amsterdam, says the address has been found.

Grijzenhout consulted for his research records which had been kept exactly how much tax canal house owners had to pay for the deepening of the canals and the maintenance of the wharfs at their doors.

This registry gives the researchers an up to fifteen centimeter accurate picture of the breadth of all the houses and the gates at the time of Vermeer. Thus Grijzenhout discovered two houses at the narrow canal along the Vlamingstraat.

Vlamingstraat now

Much has changed with the buildings of Vlamingstraat 40-42 since the age of Vermeer, as this 2015 photo shows. Basically, only the gate is left. When Vermeer painted, mostly poor refugees from Flanders lived there. The name Vlamingstraat still reminds today about them.

African diaspora artists exhibited in London, England

This video says about itself:

In the Sky’s Wild Noise: A documentary on Dr. Walter Rodney

17 December 2014

A short documentary based on an interview by Dr Walter Rodney on politics and society in Guyana in the 1970s.

By Christine Lindey in Britain:

Revelatory view of black artistry

Saturday 14th November 2015

CHRISTINE LINDEY recommends a challenging retrospective at the Guildhall Art Gallery in London

AMONG the immigrants to Britain from the Caribbean in the 1950s were Guyanese political activists Jessica and Eric Huntley and this fascinating exhibition at the Guildhall art gallery honours and explains their instrumental contribution to the African diaspora’s politics and culture in Britain from the late 1960s on.

No Colour Bar brings alive the experiences and issues faced by their community through a rich and diverse display of their archival material, along with the literature and art which they championed, among them artists’ groups such as the Caribbean Artists Movement and Black British Arts.

To counteract the paucity of public support for African and Caribbean culture, the Huntleys founded BogleL’Ouverture Publishing.

Named after the Jamaican and Haitian revolutionary leaders, from 1969 it published seminal texts, poetry, novels, posters and greeting cards asserting the African diaspora’s cultural identity and fostering resistance to the sociopolitical injustices which it faced.

That same year they opened their west London front room as a bookshop and meeting place to encourage interaction between the community and its cultural workers. The bookshop moved to commercial premises in 1975 but consciously retained its informal, homely ambiance, generating a vibrant forum for creative and political cross-fertilisations and activities such as poetry readings by Linton Kwesi Johnson and Valerie Bloom.

It was renamed in 1980 to commemorate Dr Walter Rodney, the Guyanese thinker-activist assassinated for anti-colonial resistance at the age of 38.

An interactive multimedia installation by the Afro-Caribbean scholar-artist Michael McMillan recreates the bookshop’s ambiance and provides multisensory information about the ideas, preoccupations and historical events which conditioned black British life in the 1970s and 1980s.

Imaginative touch screens, digital photo frames, books and sounds introduce a plethora of themes such as readings by activists and poets or the story of the 1970s racist and fascist attacks on the shop and other progressive outlets, which led to their joint resistance through the Bookshop Joint Action Group.

McMillan’s installation is surrounded by a comprehensive exhibition of paintings by artists, some of whom like Tam Joseph arrived in Britain as children only to be stigmatised and undervalued for their colour.

Joseph’s 1983 painting UK School Report is an uncompromising accusation of racial stereotyping suffered by black boys in British schools.

Three portrait heads of the same young man challenge our gaze. Unsmiling as in ID photographs, they increasingly fill three identically sized, rectangular frames which are underwritten with comments in different handwritings, as in school reports.

In the first, Good at Sports, the boy wears a neat uniform and European-style short hair with a parting. In the second, Likes Music, he sports Afro hair and more informal clothes.

But in the last, Needs Surveillance, he sports long dreadlocks and his head totally fills its frame as if resisting the constraints of typecasting, while its title refers both to school discipline and police harassment.

The faces painted in red, white and blue assert the boy’s Britishness yet this identity is undermined by his society’s racial prejudice.

Sonia Boyce’s She Ain’t Holding Them Up, She’s Holding On depicts a lone young woman somehow managing to physically support two adults and two children from her raised hands but whose expression mingles resolute defiance with hurt and vulnerability. This is a powerful, feminist statement about Afro-Caribbean women risking losing touch with their sense of self as they shoulder the demands of others.

Keith Piper, founder member of the 1980s BLK Art Group, explores colonialism’s dark legacy in paintings such as (You are now entering) Mau Mau Country.

Martyred but defiant Kenyan warriors — one with his lips stitched together with thread — are furiously painted, blood-red paint dripping on raw, unstretched and torn hessian. Angry slogans such as “No Barclaycards here” and “No little white lies” culminate in the triumphant, anti-colonial “We are all pagans.”

Other works such as Claudette Johnson’s sensitive but decisive black pastel drawings of strong black women, Paul Dash’s intense Self-Portrait and Denzil Forrester’s joyfully rebellious Witchdoctor celebrate their people’s beauty, intellect, energy and strength.

A display of book jackets, posters and greeting cards sold in the Bogle-L’Ouverture/Rodney bookshop includes original artwork such as Errol Lloyd’s painting of the poet Accabre Huntley.

Its reappearance on her poems’ book jacket exemplifies the curators’ welcome refusal to rigidly demarcate between “fine” art and illustration.

Such sensitive echoes and connections permeate the exhibition. We hear speeches and poetry readings in the installation by authors whose books we initially discovered through the display of book jackets.

The exhibition can be experienced on many levels, ranging from visceral responses to the arts to a scholarly study of unfamiliar topics. There is much to see, learn and enjoy in this energising testimony of the socio-political power of arts. It’s free — go if you can.

• No Colour Bar: Black British Art in Action 1960-1990 runs at the Guildhall Art Gallery, Guildhall Yard, London EC2 until January 24, opening times:

Photographer Julia Margaret Cameron, exhibition in London

This video from England says about itself:

30 September 2015

On the bicentenary of the birth of Julia Margaret Cameron (1815-1879), this film explores the life and work of one of the most important and innovative photographers of the 19th century.

By John Green in England:

Views of tender ardour: Julia Margaret Cameron

Saturday 7th November 2015

A new exhibition of Victorian photographer Julia Margaret Cameron’s work shows her to be a dynamic and creative innovator, says JOHN GREEN

Julia Margaret Cameron: Influence and Intimacy at the Science Museum, London SW7


JULIA MARGARET CAMERON was a British pioneer of photography.

Born in Calcutta, the daughter of an official of the East India Company, she was entirely self-taught and only took up the camera as a 48-year-old.

Beginning in 1863, after her daughter gave her a camera, she was only active as a photographer for 15 years.

Yet her legacy is an unrivalled series of portraits of personalities of her time, including poet Alfred Lord Tennyson, painter Holman Hunt, writer Anthony Trollope and astronomer and scientist Sir John Herschel.

“When I have had such men before my camera,” she said, “my whole soul has endeavoured to do its duty towards them in recording faithfully the greatness of the inner as well as the features of the outer man.”

Her work is made up almost entirely of portraits, many of her own family, acquaintances and servants, but in unadorned close-up.

No-one laughs, let alone smiles, in her images. This was probably due to the long exposure times needed at the time, when holding such expressions would have been difficult.

The results give her images a gravitas, earnestness and intimacy. She invariably eschews background scenery or props, giving us the face alone against dark backgrounds.

Cameron said: “From the first moment I handled my lens with a tender ardour, and it has become to me as a living thing, with voice and memory and creative vigour… I began with no knowledge of the art.

“I did not know where to place my dark box, how to focus my sitter and my first picture I effaced to my consternation by rubbing my hand over the filmy side of the glass.”

She made her albumen-silver prints from wet collodion glass-plate negatives and was innovative and unconventional in her approach to the technical applications of her medium in order to create images transcending the purely descriptive function of photography.

Her portrait of Herschel, her “teacher and high priest,” conjures a Rembrandtian figure, a Biblical prophet in three-quarter profile, staring into the far distance.

Her portrait of May Prinsep, The Wild Flower, exudes a calmness and serenity reminiscent of an Italian Renaissance portrait yet, perhaps contradictorily, it also has something of the Victorian penchant for romance and melodrama and an uncanny resemblance to Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s portraits of Jane Morris.

Cameron’s work is radically different from the conventional portrait. They are not obviously posed or staged.

In a letter to Herschel — in response to criticisms others had made about the lack of focus in some of her images — she wrote: “Who has the right to say what focus is the legitimate focus… my aspirations are to ennoble photography and to secure for it the character and uses of high art by combining the real and ideal.”

The few photographs she took in Ceylon, where she later settled with her husband, are an intriguing taster of what she could have achieved.

Two show tea plantation workers against a backdrop of the plantation, others are of local people and differ from other “colonial” images of the time in reflecting a naturalistic and observed reality rather than an attempt to record “ethnographic types” or allegorical figures.

This free exhibition will be chiefly of interest to those with an interest in the history of photography.

But it does also transport us into the Victorian world of 150 years ago better than many a painter or other photographer could do.

Runs until March 28, details:

Wildlife art exhibited in London

Rainbow lorikeets, at the London exhibition

From the Natural History Museum in London, England:

See how artists and scientists view the natural world in 110 images from the Museum’s collection in the Images of Nature gallery.

Spanning 350 years, historic prints, watercolours and paintings hang alongside modern images created by scientists, imaging specialists, photographers and micro-CT scanners.

The gallery includes a temporary exhibition of themed artworks.

Our current exhibition is The Bauer Brothers: Masters of Scientific Illustration, on display until 26 February 2017. We will showcase a new selection of exquisite botanical and zoological watercolours by Franz and Ferdinand Bauer every four months.

Star specimens and exhibits:

  • some of the first scientific images of Australian wildlife, observed by Ferdinand Bauer on the voyage of HMS Investigator (1801-1805)
  • Franz Bauer‘s intricate illustrations of orchids and other exotic plants introduced to the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
  • Roelandt Savery‘s famous dodo painting
  • a more scientifically accurate interpretation of the extinct bird by Julian Pender Hume
  • interactive screens, where you can explore a variety of artworks
  • a drawing wall, where you can contribute your own picture

Cartoon event in Brussels, Belgium

This video says about itself:

State of Denial: Western Journalism and the Middle East | Robert Fisk

5 November 2012

Robert Fisk, award-winning journalist and Middle East Correspondent for The Independent newspaper, gave the annual faculty-appointed Center for International and Regional Studies (CIRS) Distinguished Lecture on April 20, 2010 on the subject of “State of Denial: Western Journalism and the Middle East.” Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar (GU-Q) student Amna Al-Thani introduced Fisk to a capacity audience of 800 guests at the Four Seasons Hotel in Doha.

From Belgium:



First Edition

Cartoon event in the center of Europe

February 2016, MUNTPUNT, Brussels.

Cartoons engage creatively with current affairs. Uniquely capable of zooming in to magnify contradictions or untruths, and zooming out to condense wider connections or greater truths, they constitute a supremely subversive form of expression.

The event “YOU, THE WEST & THE MIDDLE EAST” provides a forum for the presentation of fierce, uncensored cartoons that force viewers to critically confront and reflect upon mutual understandings and misunderstandings of relations between “the West” and “The Middle East”.

Charlie Hebdo, radicalization, IS, the war on terror, drones, the war in Iraq, the refugee crisis … these developments leave no one untouched, and demonstrate the vital need for greater insight and understanding of what is happening in the world today.

While the success of this event relies on input and perspective from around the world, cartoonists from the Middle East are particularly encouraged to submit their work. If you would like to contribute to this groundbreaking exhibition, please submit a selection of your cartoons (maximum 3) before December 15, 2015. Original work addressing the theme of the exhibition is very welcome, but please feel free to submit previously published or exhibited work.

With your vital input, we are confident of putting together a fascinating event in February 2016. The exhibition will be accompanied by discussions between cartoonists, documentaries, lectures, workshops, and other relevant activities.

For further information regarding registration, submission of your work and other practical matters please click here! Please don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have any further questions or concerns about this ambitious exhibition. You can reach us at:

Sincerely – Ward Treunen,

The BRussells Tribunal, Muntpunt, The cartoonist, Stripgids, European Cartoon Center, Victoria de Luxe, Menarg, Vrede, Pianofabriek.