Ariana Grande song commemorates Manchester victims


This 19 April 2018 music video is Ariana Grande – No Tears Left To Cry.

The lyrics of the song are here.

In the song, Ms Grande commemorates the victims of the bloody attack on her 22 May 2017 concert in Manchester, England.

That crime was perpetrated by Salman Abedi, sent to the 2011 Libya war, with the connivance of the British secret police, to fight as a child soldier in NATO’s regime change bloodbath. That war drove Abedi completely horribly mad.

In Ms Grande’s video clip, a honey bee features. Honey bees are symbols of the city of Manchester.

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From NATO Libyan war to Manchester terrorism


This video says about itself:

Blowback: NATO, Libya, and Suicide Terror

27 February 2018

May 22, 2017: A suicide bomber walks into a pop concert in Manchester and blows himself up. There’s a lot we don’t know about the attack, and likely never well, but what we do know is that the attack on Manchester, and other similar attacks, may, in part, be blowback from Western foreign policy.

Soon after the Arab Spring arrived in Libya in February 2011, the Western powers, in the form of NATO, decided to intervene and help topple Gadhafi. Libya quickly descended into violence and chaos, enabling ISIS to sweep into the vacuum. Though many of the Libyan rebels who had protested Gadhafi were ordinary Libyans seeking freedom, some of them were “jihadi militias” and Salman Abedi, the suicide attacker, had been trained to fight in Libya alongside these “jihadi militias”.

Hosted by Mehdi Hasan.

Abedi, born in Britain, was brought by the British ‘intelligence’ service to Libya for fighting as a child soldier in a jihadist militia. That totally fucked him up.

The British government has admitted that it “likely” had contacts with two Islamist groups, the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG) and the 17 February Martyrs Brigade, for which the 2017 Manchester Arena bomber, Salman Abedi, and his father reportedly fought during the 2011 war in Libya: here.

Pro-Grenfell disaster survivors marches, London, Manchester


This video from London, England says about itself:

400 people join silent march to mark 2 months since Grenfell

15 August 2017

“This happened on Theresa May‘s watch” says one of the people who joined a silent march to mark 2 months since the Grenfell Tower fire. Locals, survivors and families of those who died in the blaze walked in the march.

From daily News Line in Britain:

Friday, 9 February 2018

London/Manchester joint Grenfell march

THE FIGHT for justice for every single man, woman and child who died in the Grenfell Tower and their families and the survivors who are still languishing in hotels almost eight months after the tragic fire is now spreading across the nation.

For the first time, next Wednesday, Manchester and London will march in tandem, with a silent march in North Kensington, London, coordinated with a silent march through central Manchester.

Since the tragedy on 14 June, protesters have held monthly silent marches near the Kensington site and with each march the deep-rooted anger, at the council, the government and the Tenants Management Organisation (TMO), has increased. Every month, the numbers grow. Last month, there were thousands on the streets.

Hundreds of survivors from the tower and the immediate buildings are still languishing in temporary accommodation, despite promises to fast-track them into new homes.

The march through Manchester will include a silent candlelit procession led by 71 people – each carrying a placard bearing the photo of someone who died. This will be followed by a minute’s silence and speeches in Piccadilly Gardens.

Kevin Allsop, who has organised the event for trades union association GMATUC, said: ‘We wanted to show our support to the people of Grenfell and hope that other cities will then pick up the baton and do something similar on the anniversary of the fire, on 14 June.’

Joe Delaney, a Grenfell survivor whose low-rise block is connected to the tower, will attend the march. He is still living in a hotel almost two miles away from home. According to Kensington and Chelsea Council, 248 households continue to reside in their homes on the Lancaster West Estate, of which the tower is part, while 66 households are in emergency hotel accommodation.

On the night of the fire, he left his home without any belongings – other than his two dogs – after spending hours helping to raise the alarm and evacuate neighbours.

It took four days of fighting with the local authority for him to be offered emergency accommodation – during which time he and his neighbour, who has a toddler, were forced to stay with one of his friends.

He said: ‘People have no trust in Kensington Borough Council. The police recovery teams are still working next to my flat and the council still hasn’t shown evidence that the building is fire-safe, eight months on.

‘This safety issue is bigger than Grenfell though. This is a national issue – there are blocks across the country with unsafe cladding still on, and where it has been removed residents are freezing.

‘The protections for tenants in this country are appalling and no matter which party is in government, little seems to change. Safety should not be seen as an undue burden. How dare they!’

The event begins at 6.15pm on 14 February at the junction of Market Street and Cross Street in central Manchester while the silent march in North Kensington begins at 5.30pm outside Kensington Town Hall, Hornton St, Kensington, London W8 7NX.

Islamophobic attempted murder in England


This video about England says about itself:

24 September 2017

An imam was rushed to hospital after he was stabbed outside a mosque by an attacker who reportedly made ‘anti-Muslim comments’.

Police have launched an investigation after Dr Nasser Kurdy was attacked with a knife outside the Altrincham Islamic Centre in Greater Manchester on Sunday.

Andrew Western, Labour councillor for Sale, Greater Manchester, said his thoughts are ‘with him and his family.’

Dr Kurdy, 58, a consultant orthopaedic surgeon, and some people had already made their way into the mosque when he was attacked at around 6pm.

He has been discharged from hospital, according to his colleague Dr Khalid Anis, a spokesman for the Altrincham and Hale Muslim Association, who said he was ‘very lucky’.

Greater Manchester Police is treating the attack as a hate crime and confirmed they have made two arrests. They have arrested two men in relation to the attack.

From the BBC in Britain today:

Altrincham mosque stabbing: Surgeon attacked in ‘hate crime

A doctor has been stabbed in the back of the neck on his way to a mosque in Greater Manchester, in a suspected hate crime.

Consultant surgeon Dr Nasser Kurdy was attacked outside the Altrincham and Hale Muslim Association at about 17:50 BST and was taken to hospital.

He has since been discharged and a 54-year-old man and a 32-year-old who were arrested are being questioned.

Greater Manchester Police have asked for any witnesses to come forward.

Dr Kurdy heard Islamophobic comments at the time of the attack, community sources said.

Police said the 58-year-old was on his way to the mosque, where he is the vice-chairman and has led prayers, when he saw another man across the road.

“A short time later he felt an injury to the back of his neck. He ran into the centre and then called emergency services.”

Assistant Chief Constable Russ Jackson said it was a “nasty and unprovoked attack” to a “much-loved” man.

‘Abusive comments’

Dr Khalid Anis, a spokesman for the mosque, said: “It could have been very, very serious.

“He [Dr Kurdy] said he noticed someone cross the road and then somebody just attacked him from behind.

“Obviously he was in shock at the time, he had just been stabbed, so the detail of those comments I don’t know – but there were definitely abusive comments made by the attackers at the door of the mosque.

“We understand it was a knife, he is very lucky.

“It’s a very unified town so for this to happen like this in the street, it is frightening.”

Dr Anis added that Dr Kurdy is “in good spirits”.

Akram Malik, chairman of the Altrincham and Hale Muslim Association, added: “It is devastating that someone has chosen to attack a community member, on his way to prayer.

“We pray that Dr Kurdy makes a full recovery and the perpetrator faces the full force of justice.”

‘Motivated by hate’

Iftikhar Awan, who attends the mosque with his wife and children, said the community was “in a state of shock”.

He added that Dr Kurdy was treated in Wythenshawe Hospital, where he works as an orthopaedic surgeon.

Det Insp [Detective Inspector] Ben Cottam said Dr Kurdy was attacked “in broad daylight”.

ACC Jackson added: “People will want to know why the attacker did this and we are treating this as a crime motivated by hate.

“It is difficult to say more than this at this time but there is nothing to suggest that this is terrorist related.”

Dear Assistant Chief Constable Jackson: since when are white supremacist terrorists not terrorists?

He said there would be an increased police presence in the areas to “reassure local people”.

The Muslim Council of Britain said it was shocked by the attack and urged the government to implement its “hate crime action plan”.