Woodpecker feeds chicks, video


This video shows a male great spotted woodpecker feeding his chicks.

Warden Evert Thomas in the Netherlands made this video.

Hungry hawfinch fed, video


This video is about a hungry hawfinch being fed.

Hans Wolters from the Netherlands made this video.

Rare mushrooms found in the Netherlands


This is an Entoloma aprile video.

Translated from the Dutch Mycological Society:

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015

During a walk in the Egmonderhout park west of Alkmaar some mushroom lovers found Entoloma aprile mushrooms. This find is new to North Holland province. Entoloma aprile had not been seen in North Holland for more than 25 years, and is currently known only from 12 other sites in the Netherlands.

Play fighting kingfishers, woodlark and little grebe


This video is about three kingfishers. On 23 May 2015, I had the privilege of seeing this species and many other beautiful birds in the Amsterdamse Waterleidingduinen nature reserve.

Near the entrance, blackcap, chiffchaff, great spotted woodpecker sounds. Barn swallows flying around.

In the Oranjekom lake, many tufted ducks. A coot tries to drive them away. Near the other bank, a little grebe swims.

Four great cormorants in a tree.

We continue to a bridge. Two kingfishers sit on bushes on the bank. Then, a fight seems to break out: both fall in the water, then fly back to the branches. Probably a play fight between two young birds.

Houndstongue flowers.

A young fallow deer.

A nightingale sings. A tree pipit, a reed warbler, a willow warbler, a redstart all sing.

A garden warbler. A cuckoo. A whitethroat.

Field mouse-ear and redstem filaree flowers.

Wild pansies.

A woodlark flies, singing.

Green woodpecker sound.

Cinnabar moths flying.

Much higher, a swift.

A common sandpiper.

Grey lag geese swimming with their youngsters.

A Canada goose flying, calling.

A reed warbler on a reed stem. Seconds later, a great tit on another reed stem.

We arrive back at Oranjekom. Not only tufted ducks; also a gadwall couple.

See also this report.

Crustacean, new for the Netherlands, discovered


This Dutch video is about the marine biology expedition to the Klaverbank in the North Sea in May 2015.

Translated from the Dutch ichthyologists of Stichting ANEMOON:

Sunday, May 24th, 2015

During the Greenpeace campaign to protect the Klaverbank from 2 to 10 May 2015 scuba divers and a member of the volunteer organization the ANEMOON Foundation studied the biodiversity of this unique marine Natura 2000 site. In addition, they discovered a new sea creature for the Dutch fauna: Gnathia dentata, a 3 to 4 millimeters lobster-like crustacean. This discovery and observations of many other sea creatures, rare for the Netherlands, reaffirm the natural value of the Klaverbank. It is time that the Dutch government should establish protected status for this valuable and unique natural area in the Dutch North Sea.

Buddhist clerical sexual abuse in the Netherlands


This video from Thailand, with English subtitles, says about itself:

2 March 2014

Protection of Children’s Rights Foundation (Thailand) produced this video to campaign for laws against possessing child sexual abuse material and raising awareness of foreigners arrested in Thailand for child sex abuse jumping bail.

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

Sexual abuse among Buddhists in Netherlands

Today, 15:56

By NOS-Net editor Bas de Vries

Buddhist monks and teachers in the Netherlands have been guilty in recent decades of sexual abuse of students, both men and women. In some cases the victims were minors. There are abuse scandals in, eg, Waalwijk, Middelburg and Makkinga (Friesland province).

People have been silent about the abuse for decades in some cases. But after the scandals in the Catholic Church now victims of abuse by Buddhist leaders are telling their stories.

Thai monk

In recent months, the NOS spoke together with Buddhism scholar Rob Hogendoorn, among others with three victims of a Thai monk who after his arrival in the Netherlands in the 1970s for at least twenty years abused young men or attempted to do so.

This Mettavihari, according to those involved, in the early 1980s had to leave his temple in Waalwijk. The reason is said to have been a message to the police about the molestation of a minor.

Earlier this month a number of Mettavihari’s former followers decided, after a silence of decades, to speak out about “repeated inappropriate behavior”. Their statement shows that they have already known this for decades. The reason to speak out now, according to them, is that their recent own research showed that the abuse was worse than they thought until now.

Scandals

This affair of Mettavihari, deceased in 2007, does not stand alone. The NOS also investigated two other major scandals involving teachers abusing their dominant position with respect to often very vulnerable students. In both cases, the people involved went to the police, but ultimately did not lodge official complaints. Those issues were in various places.

– A Buddhist center in Middelburg, where ‘Kelsang Chöpel’ (the Austrian Gerhard Mattioli) was guilty in the period 2001-2008 of harassment and sexual abuse of female students. In minutes of the Buddhist Union of the Netherlands (BUN) the former president spoke of “a self-proclaimed lama (teacher) who in a horrible way has wreaked havoc.” The BUN sent several people to speak with the victims and gave no further publicity to the scandal.

– A monastery in the Frisian Makkinga. End of 2001, ‘Dhammawiranatha’ (then again Pierre Krul from Den Haag) resigned as a monk after he was confronted with the many sexual relationships he had entered with women. Also in this case the people involved appealed to the BUN. A board member noted: “The stories were truly staggering: brainwashing, instigation, ruining financially, sexual relationships with (usually mentally dependent) women, but also with very young, underage girls.” This issue is the only one which made it to the press. The website of his organization gives the impression that Krul in any case last year was still active as a teacher.

Also very recently, there were cases of abuse in Buddhist circles. The Buddhist teacher Frank Uyttebroeck reports that since 2010 at least five other people who were abused by five different teachers, have sought help from him. Two of them were so traumatized that he referred them to the medical community. He does not mention the names of these teachers, in his own words because he had pledged that to the victims.

Culture of silence

The victims who are willing to come out think the time is now to end the culture of silence, as has happened in the Catholic Church. They cite the example of the United States, where hundreds of Zen teachers last January published an open letter in which they offered their apologies for their “collective failure” in the fight against abuse.

Professor of practical theology Ruard Ganzevoort, specializing in religion and trauma, is not surprised that now among the Buddhists this problem is surfacing. “You can see in every religious tradition that if you bring vulnerable people in contact with people reputed to have much authority, with too little oversight, abuse will occur.”

Codes of conduct

Most Buddhist organizations in the Netherlands are now beginning to think about measures to stop sexual abuse in their own circles and to help victims better. After questions by the NOS about this the executive of the Buddhist Union in the Netherlands recently sent an appeal to the more than forty affiliated centers.

In it, the BUN, the contact point of the Dutch government for the 50,000 to 65,000 Buddhists in the Netherlands, poins out the importance of precautions. “For example, through confidants, codes of conduct or otherwise.” The administration warns individual Buddhists “to orientate well and think” before they join a particular organization or teacher.

“I want to particularly say this to make it clear that you should act immediately if something is wrong,” said Patrick Franssen, who was abused in the 1970s from his 19th year in his own words forty to fifty times by Mettavihari. “You have to stop it early, otherwise even worse things will happen. And do not be afraid of negative publicity. Buddhism can take criticism, it is much larger than these issues.”

The Dalai Lama and sexual abuse among Buddhists: here.