Sea eagles mating, video


This video is about two sea eagles in Lauwersmeer national park in the Netherlands, mating while shelducks fly past.

Michael Kopijn made this video on 5 March 2015.

White-tailed eagles in new Dutch wildlife film


This is a 27 November 2014 video interview, in English, with cameraman Paul Edwards.

For the new Dutch wildlife film Holland, natuur in de Delta, Paul Edwards was in the Biesbosch national park for months; filming a white-tailed eagle nest and great crested grebes.

The film is expected to be in the cinemas in September 2015.

Young sea eagle seen again in Scotland


This 2013 video from Scotland is called Mull Charters – White-tailed Sea Eagle Fishing.

From Wildlife Extra:

Sona, the lucky White-tailed Eagle, turns up unexpectedly in south west Scotland

A young White-tailed Eagle that hit the headlines last year when her dramatic nest eviction was caught on camera, has caused a new stir after choosing Dumfries and Galloway as her latest stamping ground.

The bird, nicknamed Sona or Lucky in Gaelic, had to be returned to her nest on the island of Mull by Forestry Commission Scotland climbers last June after being attacked by an intruding eagle and falling 30ft to the ground.

This video from Scotland says about itself:

A dramatic sequence indeed: An immature White-tailed Eagle lands on a branch next to the nest. The chick starts to call repeatedly. At 1min 45secs the immature WTE jumps into the nest. There follows a tense stand-off. At 4mins 30secs the chick is forced from the nest, and falls 30ft to the ground. The intruder starts to eat the food.

This video from Scotland says about itself:

The male (Cuin) arrives with a fish, food for what he believes is his chick. However the intruding immature WTE reacts extremely aggressively, taking Cuin by surprise. This short fracas ends up with Cuin hanging upside down over the nest edge while still holding on to the fish. He then breaks free, only to return a short while later to try and evict the immature WTE…. He fails and again flies off. He returns later and lands on the branch next to the nest constantly calling for his own chick. Possibly hearing the chick below on the ground, he flies off. – continued in “White-tailed Eagle 29/06/14 – Nest Invasion Part 3″.

This video from Scotland says about itself:

White-tailed Eagle 28/06/14 – Nest Invasion Part 3

Having established that the chick is on the ground, the immature bird is finally evicted by the male (Cuin) and the female (Sula). The nest is reclaimed. However their chick remains extremely vulnerable on the ground below. FOOTNOTE: The following day the chick was returned to the nest by two Forestry Commission Scotland climbers. A thorough health check confirmed that it was quite unharmed. Of course the chick’s fate would have been quite different if it wasn’t for the live camera on the nest and the “eagle eye” of RSPB Mull Officer, Dave Sexton.

The Wildlife Extra article continues:

The behaviour, which can be seen at www.carnyx.tv, had never been recorded before and was a surprise to the experts.

Now Sona has provided a further surprise this January after being repeatedly sighted in the south west corner of Scotland, where White-tailed Eagles haven’t bred for over 150 years.

Dave Sexton, RSPB Scotland Mull Officer, says: “We know this bird well after all the drama last summer, and I’m extremely relieved to hear that she’s alive and apparently healthy.

“We got her back into her nest uninjured after her dangerous fall, and she fledged a few weeks later. But that’s often the last we’ll see of these young eagles, as they wander quite widely in their first few years.

“It’s unusual to have so many sightings of a juvenile like this in Dumfries and Galloway, even though it’s perfect eagle habitat.

“She’s gone from the Isle of Mull to the Mull of Galloway, probably via the Mull of Kintyre, so she clearly likes to mull things over!”

Sona was one of the stars of the BBC’s Springwatch in 2014. She was just eight-weeks old when she was forced from her nest on FCS land on Mull.

A member of the public, who had been watching the nest webcam, alerted the Mull Eagle Watch team to the truth behind her tumble, allowing the dramatic footage to come to light.

It was also members of the public who spotted the bird in Dumfries and Galloway, and their photographs and film sent to the RSPB identified her.

Chris Rollie, RSPB Scotland area manager for Dumfries and Galloway, says: “We’d heard reports of White-tailed Eagle sightings from several Wigtownshire locations in the last few weeks, and thanks to her leg rings and local birdwatcher Brian Henderson’s photography, we were able to positively identify her as the lucky Mull bird.

“As you can imagine, people have been very excited. White-tailed Eagles are such distinctive birds and it’s an absolute pleasure to see one.

“They haven’t bred in Dumfries and Galloway since 1856 and Sona will probably move on to another area before long. But it gives you a real glimpse of what the future could be and the hope there is now, just 40 years after their re-introduction, that these magnificent birds could once again be seen in our skies right across Scotland.”

White-tailed Eagles were re-introduced first to Rum in 1975, and quickly spread to nearby islands.

An east-coast re-introduction project began in 2007, with the first chick successfully fledging in 2013.

Sona’s mother, Sula, was a Norwegian bird released in the first year of the east-coast project, showing that the two populations are now starting to come together to breed.

Sula, and her mate Cuin, will once again be the stars of the Mull Eagle Watch webcam (provided by Carnyx Wild) this year, and you can also visit them in person through organised trips starting in April.

White-tailed eagles nesting again


This video from Sweden is called White-tailed Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla).

Dutch conservationists Natuurmonumenten report today that a white-tailed eagle couple has built a nest on the Vogeleiland (Bird island) in the Zwarte Meer lake.

In 2010, white-tailed eagles tried to nest there as well, but a storm destroyed the nest.

The young female of the present couple has a ring, showing she was born at the eyrie in Oostvaardersplassen national park. The male is older; it is not known where he was born.

USA: 10 Places to See Bald Eagles this Winter: here

Alaskan woman jailed for helping bald eagle?


This video from Pennsylvania in the USA is called First eaglet hatches at Pittsburgh Hays bald eagle nest 3-28-2014.

By Lisa Phu in Alaska:

Hiker who freed trapped eagle due in court today

January 22, 2015 at 5:35 am

A bald eagle was lying on the ground, each leg shut inside traps. When Juneau resident Kathleen Adair came across it scouting a trail for a group hike, the eagle was alive and looking at her. She spent an hour freeing it.

But there’s more to the story. Two and a half weeks later, Alaska Wildlife Troopers cited her for the hindrance of lawful trapping. She now faces a potential $500 fine and 30 days in jail.

On Dec. 24, Kathleen Adair was on Davies Creek Trail when she saw the eagle in her path. She’s familiar with the Juneau Raptor Center and knew the bird rescue nonprofit would be concerned, so she took photos of what she saw and recorded the GPS coordinates.

“I wanted to go back and tell the Raptor Center where it was. I knew that would be the best thing to do, but I also knew that it would be getting dark soon. It was 2 miles from the road and it was all the way at the end of the road, so I knew that they wouldn’t be able to get out there that day to it,” Adair says.

So she took the matter into her own hands. Before untangling the eagle from what she describes as two large long spring traps, she noticed a smaller trap on the other side of the trail. Out of concern for the three dogs with her, she sprang it. She then tied the dogs up so she could deal with the eagle.

Adair says the eagle’s legs were wrapped up in the trap chains. Before she did anything, she covered the eagle’s head to keep it docile, something she’s learned from her time around raptors. She says it took an hour to get the eagle out of two traps.

“I knew at the time that the eagle didn’t have a very good chance. I knew if I left it there all night, it would have had a worse chance of surviving,” Adair says. “But even as it was, I could tell one of the legs was just dangling, just completely broken and I knew they wouldn’t be able to fix that, but I was hoping they could at least fix the other and keep it as an educational bird.”

She placed the eagle in a large pack and hiked it out. When she got to what she estimates to be a half mile from the highway, she spotted another large trap near the trail. She sprung that one as well, worried for the hikers that would be on the trail in the coming days.

Adair is no stranger to the outdoors. She spent the early part of her life in Ketchikan and Prince of Wales Island. She moved to Juneau when she was 9 and has lived here for almost 30 years. She grew up fishing and hunting and shot a bear at age 16. She raises rabbits for food. As an avid outdoors person, she often sees traps, but had never tampered with any before this. She saw one earlier that day, but it had been hanging from a tree and off the trail.

“I’m not against trapping per se. I am concerned about the traps when they’re on the trail in such a way as these were,” Adair says.

As soon as she drove into cell phone range, Adair called the Raptor Center. She brought the eagle to a volunteer’s house and sent photos. She was told the Raptor Center would call U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies to report the incident. At that point, she thought her involvement was done.

The eagle was immediately brought to a vet in Juneau where it was later euthanized.

Three days later, Adair led nine people on an 8-hour hike on Davies Creek Trail to the Thiel Glacier. It was dark as the group was finishing. Adair again saw a large trap near the trail head and sprung it. She says she was concerned for the hikers’ safety. Adair knows it’s illegal to mess with lawfully set traps. She wasn’t sure about this one because it was so close to the trail.

State and municipal codes say it’s illegal to trap within a half mile of any road and within a quarter mile of a designated list of trails. Davies Creek Trail is not on that list, but it is in the popular book, “90 Short Walks Around Juneau.” Adair says there was another group on the trail that same day.

Alaska Wildlife Trooper Sgt. Aaron Frenzel says his office received a complaint from a trapper on Dec. 30 regarding someone tampering with several of his traps. On Jan. 10, Adair was cited. The paperwork only identifies the trapper as “J.F.”

Frenzel says he doesn’t know how many traps had been tampered with. To his knowledge, no photos are part of the investigation. Since the complaint, he says no troopers have gone to the site to look at the traps.

“We got out and do routine checks of trap lines throughout the Juneau area so we had already been on this trap line once before and there was really no reason to go back in since there was nothing to investigate at that point,” he says.

At the start of the Trooper investigation, Frenzel says he didn’t know about a trapped eagle. He says that information got to him sometime after Jan. 1 via the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

“What we expect from the public is if they come upon an eagle in a trap, to notify us as soon as possible. That way we can go out there and see what’s going on,” Frenzel says.

He says hindering lawful traps is illegal, but freeing an eagle from traps isn’t.

“If a trap’s already sprung on a animal, you cannot hinder it because that trap can no longer be caught, so whatever you do to that trap, you’re really not hindering at that point. That would not be something we would cite for, if a person came in and was freeing an eagle from a trap the eagle was in,” Frenzel says.

There is no regulation against accidentally trapping bald eagles. Frenzel says in the eight years he’s been in Juneau, he hasn’t heard of any other cases of trapped eagles and troopers haven’t cited anyone for hindering traps.

Jesse Ross is a trapper in Juneau and a member of the Alaska Trappers Association. He says he sympathizes with Adair. He’s seen wounded animals in nature and he’s accidentally trapped animals he wasn’t targeting.

“It’s unfortunate. You feel bad that you caught something that is now wasted and hopefully you learn, say, ‘Hey, maybe what could I have done different?’ That’s what I tell myself when I see that,” Ross says.

But he says Adair broke the law.

Ross says trappers follow a code of ethics and go to great lengths to reduce the possibility of trapping nontarget animals, but he says they’re guidelines. Trapping is ultimately about good judgment.

“Just because it’s legal doesn’t mean it’s necessarily the right thing to do,” Ross says.

Adair is being arraigned in court this afternoon at 1 p.m. As of last night, she didn’t have a lawyer.

Oregon Is The Place To See Bald Eagles In January And February: here.

Save Europe’s vultures and eagles


This video says about itself:

11 February 2013

This video tells the story of a poisoned Bonelli’s Eagle that was rehabilitated in North Cyprus by a group of local conservationists who have been tracking the status of the species in their country.

From BirdLife:

By Luca Bonaccorsi, Thu, 25/09/2014 – 14:59

After months of wrestling, the European Commission has given mandate to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) to assess the risks to vulture populations of the use of veterinary medicines containing diclofenac. This represents a major breakthrough and opens the door for the European ban of the killer drug that wiped out entire vulture populations in Asia. BirdLife International and the Vulture Conservation Foundation appeal to all parties involved to submit scientific evidence to the EMA by 10 October 2014.

Diclofenac is a veterinary anti-inflammatory drug that kills vultures and eagles – in India it caused a 99% decline of a number of vulture species there, before eventually being banned in four countries in the region. Quite incredibly, veterinary diclofenac has now been allowed to be used on farm animals in Europe – in Estonia, Italy and Spain for cattle, pigs and horses, and in the Czech Republic and Latvia for horses only. The drug has been marketed by an Italian company named FATRO, and was allowed using loopholes in the EU guidelines to assess risk of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs.

The European Medicines Agency has now opened a public consultation on the matter, directed at all professional bodies with information about scavenging birds, veterinary practices and the disposal of animal by-products. With this decision, the European Commission acknowledges the facts raised by BirdLife International and the Vulture Conservation Foundation, who are leading an international campaign to ban veterinary diclofenac in Europe.

José Tavares, Executive Director of the VCF states: “It is impossible to leave this drug out there, and it’s the time for the EU to acknowledge the reality on the ground in countries like Italy and Spain. Even if there was a strict veterinary prescription system – and this is not the case – it would still be impossible for the veterinary managing the drug to oversee the disposal of all the dead animals. In Spain when pigs, lambs and goats die in open fields they are often reached by vultures even before farmers are aware of it.”

Iván Ramírez, Head of Conservation for Europe and Central Asia at BirdLife International says: “We welcome the decision, and thank our BirdLife Partners and supporters. Our vulture experts are working on our reply to EMA, but it is crucial that we take any single opportunity to call for the immediate ban of this product. There are safe alternatives and we have already seen how dangerous veterinary diclofenac is for vultures. We won’t stop until a European ban is implemented”.

This video is called Stop Vulture Poisoning Now.

New research published by a Spanish-British-American team in Conservation Biology documents a suspected flunixin poisoning of a wild Eurasian griffon vulture from Spain: here.

Golden eagles in southern Scotland


This video from Canada says about itself:

16 August 2011

Birds of prey expert John Campbell teaches his nephew to put an identifying band on a golden eagle chick. Close up and personal views of the nest, its reluctant inhabitant, and the birds’ food sources. Spectacular views of Southern Alberta. The banding is part of a program to protect the species. The band goes on fairly tightly because the birds’ legs don’t grow further in diameter as the bird grows.

From Wildlife Extra:

Golden eagles could return to southern Scotland

Improvements to habitats in the south of Scotland could lead the area to become a stronghold for golden eagles.

A study carried out by the Scottish Natural Heritage showed that the area could potentially support up to 16 pairs, almost four times the present number.

At the moment there are thought to be no more than one or two pairs in Galloway and no more than three in the Scottish Borders.

Prof Des Thompson of SNH, who led the research, told the BBC “We would now like to see on-the-ground, practical work to improve the habitat for golden eagles in the south of Scotland.

“With habitat improvements, we could see connections with the small reintroduced population in Ireland. This would help both groups of eagles and could even help bolster the population in the north of England.”

Duncan Orr-Ewing, RSPB Scotland Head of Species and Land Management, said: “These magnificent birds should be given every opportunity to recover and reoccupy lost range, and must be protected in practice from the effects of human persecution, which remains a significant threat to this species, and in particular to this perilously small and isolated population.”

The total number of golden eagles in Scotland is 440 pairs, with most of the birds found in the Highlands and Islands.