Rudolf Steiner’s anthroposophy and racism


This 2015 video is called Ursula Haverbeck: The Panorama interview, with English subtitles.

Ms Haverbeck is an infamous German neonazi. In this interview, she is in denial about Adolf Hitler’s holocaust of Jews.

Ms Haverbeck was convicted several times, as Holocaust denial is illegal in Germany.

Her late husband Werner Georg Haverbeck was also a neonazi. Before that, he was a prominent official of Hitler’s NSDAP party and, after World War II, a priest in the The Christian Community church. The Christian Community church was founded by Rudolf Steiner, also the founder of the Steiner schools. Werner Georg Haverbeck wrote a biography of Steiner, praising him as a fellow German nationalist and racist.

By Peter Frost in Britain:

Rudolf Steiner, clairvoyant, educationist and racist

Saturday 9th December 2017

PETER FROST first discovered the weird ideas of Austrian occultist Rudolf Steiner in Watford 45 years ago. Now Steiner schools are back in the headlines

THE Rudolf Steiner School, in Kings Langley near Watford, has been ordered to close after a totally unsatisfactory Ofsted inspection.

The Secretary of State for Education has issued a notice for the school, which charges between £3,405 and £8,370 a year in fees, to be deregistered and closed.

The school is currently appealing against the decision and will continue to operate until a final decision has been made, probably before Christmas.

It is not allowed to take in any new students but it has appointed a new head and completely changed its board of trustees.

The school has also issued a public apology to children and their families for “real and serious failings going back several years”, acknowledging that it had failed to act on “repeated concerns raised by parents” over safeguarding, bullying and other issues.

The decision comes after Denis McCarthy, a senior staff member who was also a leading figure in Britain’s Steiner school movement, was sacked from the school for gross misconduct.

The Sunday Telegraph has reported that McCarthy was also a senior figure in the Steiner-inspired movement called anthroposophy.

The school, it seems, did everything that they could to protect him: minimising or dismissing concerns and deleting emails.

About 45 years ago, my wife Ann and I moved out of London to Watford in Hertfordshire. Watford was then well known as a centre of the glossy magazine printing industry.

We soon met up with the large and active Communist Party in the town. As well as the local branch, there was also an industrial branch for printers in the huge Sun Printers and Odham’s print works in the town.

There were also a good few printers working at the Communist Party’s own national print works, Farleigh Press, which was located in the town. (Indeed, the Morning Star is printed in Watford today, by Trinity Mirror.)

All this communist activity encouraged many other progressive organisations, including the Woodcraft Folk, the Workers Music Association and the Co-operative Women’s Guild too.

All in all it was an active and interesting cultural left-wing community but one aspect of it always surprised and troubled me.

Many of the better-off communists in the town choose to send their children to a private fee-paying school — that very same Steiner school that has just hit the headlines for all the wrong reasons.

All those years ago Watford and its district still had single-sex grammar schools, a co-educational mixed grammar school, faith schools, as well as a good selection of secondary moderns, both mixed and single-sex. Things have changed little today.

As I have already said, it also had the Steiner school offering what seemed like a very liberal kind of education, albeit at fees of many hundreds of pounds a year.

The school seemed to offer laid-back and liberal education with an emphasis on art and culture rather than science but also with a few rather curious features.

From pupils at the school I learnt that they didn’t allow black paint in the art studios and didn’t allow younger pupils to even start to learn to read until they were seven years old.

More recent pupils have told me other disquieting things. Parents of a left-handed pupil were advised to tie the youngster’s left hand behind his back to encourage more common right-handed behaviour.

Other recent pupils have told me that they hated the stroking some staff used as a disciplinary measure.

On the pastoral side the schools discouraged vaccinations and used homeopathic first aid and healthcare. The lack of vaccinations means that some Steiner schools have received health warnings as measles danger spots.

The schools also taught a Steiner-invented therapeutic dance and movement technique called eurhythmy.

They encouraged really close relationships between staff, pupils and their families. This included home visits and even staff going on holiday with pupils and their families.

This obviously continues and was one of the criticisms in the recent Ofsted report. Staff took older pupils to lunch and there was no reliable mechanism to check if the pupils returned to school in the afternoon.

These curious features of Steiner education made me keen to find out more about Rudolf Steiner, the Austrian-born clairvoyant and occultist, who died in 1925.

Steiner, I soon discovered, seemed to have written about just about everything. He had weird ideas about almost everything, including the occult, alternative medicine, agriculture, racial superiority, even the lost continent of Atlantis [where he claimed there were already airplanes ten thousands of years ago] and, of course, education.

This vast and diverse collection of his ideas had become part of both a philosophy and a movement known as anthroposophy.

Strangely, I discovered that, although it seemed all the staff at the Steiner schools were enthusiastic anthroposophists — indeed it seemed to be an essential qualification for the job — the actual philosophy was never openly taught or indeed even mentioned by name within teaching at the school.

It was only when I started to study Steiner’s incredible racist ideas I realised why they would be reluctant to make them public.

Steiner believed that black people had an instinctive approach to life while white Caucasian people approached life intellectually.

Every race, he believed, had a natural geographical homeland where they should live — black people in Europe were a nuisance, he wrote.

Steiner argued there was also what he called a hierarchy in races. Inferior races were at the bottom of an evolutionary staircase he helpfully sketched out in one of his books.

There were a number of racial groups with “negroes” at the bottom and “white Aryans” and particularly Nordic Germanic Aryans at the top of the pile. In between there were various “brown” and “yellow” inferior races.

When a person of any race died they were reincarnated. If they had good karma they would come back as what Steiner saw as a superior race until after a number of satisfactory lives they would achieve a top-of-the-pile white Aryan existence. Others would move down in the pecking order.

Recently, it has been reported that when four white Steiner teachers taking part in a survey were asked to tick a box giving their ethnicity, they ticked every box, explaining that over their many lives and reincarnations they had moved up through the races.

Steiner saw skin colour and race as central to understanding a person’s spirituality. No wonder Hitler and his nazis were so enthusiastic in accepting and promoting Steiner’s ideas on race.

Steiner also often pronounced his strong anti-semitic views. Here is just one quote which will give you a flavour of his thinking. “Jewry as such has outlived itself for a long time. It does not have the right to exist in the modern life of nations. That it has survived, nevertheless, is a mistake by world history, of which the consequences were bound to come.”

Another strong but strange basis of anthroposophy was Steiner’s version of organic farming, called biodynamism. This included more than its fair share of myth, muck and magic.

Among the techniques used was the burying of cattle horns filled with either cow dung or crushed flint.

After many months the horn’s contents were dug up and dissolved in water to create a liquid manure of microscopic homeopathic-type dilution.

Practitioners were carefully instructed that this must be done by stirring for exactly 30 minutes in a clockwise direction and then another half an hour in an anti-clockwise direction.

Today one of the few strongholds of biodynamism is, perhaps predictably, among California’s wine growers.

Another area of study for Steiner was anthroposophic medicine, including drugs, art therapy, rhythmic massages, special exercises and anthroposophic nursing.

His anthroposophic drugs are based on ancient alchemy and homeopathic notions, far removed from modern medical science.

For example, Steiner’s intuition convinced him that mistletoe might help treat cancer because, like cancer, mistletoe is a parasitic growth that eventually kills its host.

Today, mostly in Germany, the sale of mistletoe remedies for cancer produces enormous funding for the entire Steiner anthroposophy movement.

So with such a bunch of unlikely beliefs, how has it been possible that Kings Langley and other Steiner schools have got away with such serious failings and not been uncovered by the inspection regime?

Over the years the Steiner movement successfully lobbied the government that their schools should be inspected not by normal Ofsted inspectors, but by a special, much more sympathetic body, the School Inspection Service.

Steiner schools tended to get glowing reports from these inspectors. However, it would appear at Kings Langley that persistent complaints from parents have resulted in Ofsted stepping in and producing a more accurate and critical report.

A number of years ago the Steiner schools campaigned to have some of their institutions directly funded by the Department for Education. Three actually achieved state funding.

One of the leading lobbyists on behalf of the Steiner schools movement was the novelist Emma Craigie, better known as Emma Beatrice Rees-Mogg.

She is none other than the sister of the arch-right-wing Tory and Dickensian villain lookalike, Jacob Rees-Mogg MP.

Craigie had a word with her brother’s fellow Tory MP, Michael Gove, when he was still in opposition, even showing him round a Steiner school.

Three Steiner schools got their state funding in 2012 when Gove was education secretary. Others are still working towards state funding.

So will the Steiner school in Kings Langley survive? That is important to nearly three dozen other private Steiner schools which also dream of getting state funding.

Or will the school close and the resulting post-mortem and enquiries help shine a bright cleansing light on the nasty, nutty, racist beliefs of Rudolf Steiner and end the scandal that allows state funding for this awful education system and the racist and superstitious philosophy that is at its root?

Get militarism out of British schools


This video says about itself:

Britain’s 250,000 boy soldiers in World War I

25 May 2014

A quarter of a million boy soldiers, some as young as 14, enlisted in World War One by lying about their age. Around 120,000 of them were killed or injured. One 17-year-old was shot for desertion. The government and military — desperate to boost recruitment — turned a blind eye to the thousands of child soldiers sent to the trenches.

By Rhianna Louise in Britain:

The Ministry of Defence must stay out of schools

Saturday 7th October 2017

Children don’t need militarism. They need a decent learning environment, writes RHIANNA LOUISE

“CADET units can improve attendance and educational achievement, supporting children in ways that schools cannot,” said an interim report on the social impact of cadet forces published this week by the University of Northampton.

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon praised the report while announcing 31 new cadet units in state schools.

The funding of the cadet expansion programme, part of nearly £90 million that has gone into military programmes in education since 2012, seems rather an anomaly.

In contrast, non-military services and facilities for young people have been decimated in recent years, and education is facing a funding crisis.

Teaching and support staff posts are being cut, along with Special Educational Needs (SEN) provision and spending on books and equipment. Funding for education of 16-19 year olds has been devastated.

Outside the classroom, the picture is equally bleak. Youth clubs have been so badly hit that they are closing up and down the country and may become once more reliant on Dickensian philanthro-capitalism.

Children’s mental health services have also faced cuts, with funding falling by nearly £50m between 2010 and 2015.

I’ve seen first-hand the impact of these cuts, having worked as a teaching assistant in a comprehensive school. My team supported pupils with physical needs and learning difficulties in and outside the classroom.

The department has now been cut to the bone. One Year Eight pupil with learning difficulties offered to run a cake sale to raise money for us.

I was a “mentor” to an 11-year-old boy — I’ll call him Connor — who struggled academically and behaviourally, due to emotional difficulties.

Many of his issues arose from home, where there was a history of abuse. Connor started the year well, and asked repeatedly if he could have counselling, which had helped him in primary school. But the school was unable to provide this.

As the year progressed, Connor got into fights and disengaged from learning. I pushed for him to be given extra support, but by the time occasional “anger management” sessions were offered to him, he had already started down a pathway he wouldn’t come back from easily. He was expelled the next year.

The University of Northampton report, and Fallon’s dream of cadet units blossoming up and down the country, herald the cadet forces as the solution to the struggles of children like Connor.

This is premised on the militarist narrative in which the military is the highest of institutions, a school for the nation which offers a solution to all of society’s problems. This narrative is disingenuous, flawed, and dangerous.

It is disingenuous because Ministry of Defence documents show that the advancement of military influence in education, including cadet expansion, is not motivated by the best interests of young people.

Rather, it is motivated by the militarisation agenda; to increase uncritical support for the military (and their operations) and boost recruitment.

The report itself mixes child development aims with defence aims such as savings, recruitment and PR for the armed forces.

It is flawed, because while the cadet forces offer benefits to many young people, so too would any well-funded youth programme with excellent resources.

It is dangerous, because while the report deems it praiseworthy that the cadet forces are a route to recruitment — while simultaneously lauding the benefits offered by cadets for socio-economically disadvantaged and emotionally troubled young people — in fact military service can be highly damaging to this demographic in particular.

As evidenced in a new report called The First Ambush? Effects of army training and employment, commissioned by Veterans for Peace UK, young people with experiences of childhood adversity, who exhibit violent behaviour at a young age, or have mental health problems, are not for the most part “rescued” by a military career.

They are likely to leave early and face unemployment due to a lack of transferable qualifications after leaving education to enlist. Their early difficulties leave them more susceptible to mental health problems triggered by training and in service.

Children like Connor don’t need a cadet force to try to mould them into controlled, obedient and patriotic young citizens. They need proper and sustained mental health support in a supportive learning environment with qualified professionals.

They need well-funded education. They need opportunities to feel comfortable and confident, to grow in empathy and self-efficacy. Such opportunities are not unique to or owned by military environments.

The primary aim of the Ministry of Defence is not to advance the wellbeing of young people. Its priorities may in fact sometimes clash with the best interests of the young people with whom it interacts.

This is evidenced by the much criticised practice of recruiting young people before they are adults, the culture of silencing and cover-up around abuse, and the “moral exploitation” of promoting often ethically perilous agendas to young people.

I asked Dr Brian Belton, an international authority on youth work, what he thought about the University of Northampton report.

Youth work is divided into two movements, he said; one which seeks to “harness and develop young people, primarily for the benefit of the maintenance of the state,” and one in which young people are seen to have “the capacity within themselves to be creative and auto-didactic in terms of learning about themselves and the world.”

Even if we are concerned purely with outcome, he argues that “military ethos” type projects like the cadet forces are not what we actually need today: “the modern world does not require conformity, it demands innovation.”

We should all be very concerned by the direction in which education and youth work is heading. A growing socio-economic chasm and calls to “fill the ranks” of the military from Britain’s schools do not bear much promise for a new generation equipped to thrive in the modern world and respond to the challenges it faces.

Instead of pushing militarist conformity, we should be investing in education, mental health facilities and youth work that supports young people to think critically, innovatively and ethically.

Rhianna Louise is the education and outreach officer at ForcesWatch. For more on Forces Watch visit: forceswatch.net.

Big pro-evolution biology demonstration in Turkey


This 3 July 2017 video from the USA says about itself:

Turkey Stops Teaching High School Students Evolution

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Turkey: Teachers fight for secularism

Wednesday 20th September 2017

TRADE unionists in Turkey have called on the public to “raise their voice” against the removal of the theory of evolution from the school curriculum.

Ahmet Hamdi Camli, an MP from Turkey’s ruling Justice and Development Party, created uproar when he said: “It’s useless to teach maths to students who don’t know jihad.”

Government officials have called for a “vengeful and religious generation,” exclusion of the theory of evolution and the inclusion of jihad in the curriculum.

A mass rally for secular education organised by teachers’ union Egitim-Sen and the Alevi Bektasi Federation was held in Istanbul on Sunday.

MPs from the opposition Republican People’s Party and People’s Democratic Party joined the rally to “stand against bigotry and fight for the future of the country.”

Egitim-Sen general secretary Feray Aytekin Aydogan called for an education system that is “free, scientific, secular, and equal” and the right to be taught in Kurdish. “We are not going to surrender to darkness”, he said.

London Grenfell disaster survivor girl gets top school grades


This TV video from Britain says about itself:

16 June 2017

16-year-old Ines Alves and her brother Tiago lived on the 13th floor of Grenfell Tower. They both ended up running for lives on the night of the fire, but the very next morning, Ines went back to school to sit her chemistry GCSE exam. They share their story.

By Felicity Collier in London, England:

Grenfell: Survivor who sat exam hours after fire gets top grades

Friday 25th August 2017

A TEENAGER who escaped from Grenfell Tower and sat her chemistry GCSE the next morning was awarded an A grade yesterday.

Ines Alves, who lived with her family on the 13th floor, fled the fire in the middle of the night with just her mobile phone and chemistry notes before sitting the exam at 9am still wearing the same clothes.

The 16-year-old also scored the highest possible grades in maths — a 9 which is equivalent to an A* under the old system — and A* in Spanish.

Sacred Heart High School head teacher Marian Doyle called her results “fantastic.”

“It must have been so hard for her to actually come in and do that and try to blot out the scenes of what she had seen,” she said.

The student said that at first she thought the fire was “nothing major” and had just wanted to sit the paper, adding: “There was no point me carrying on watching the building burning so I just went in.”

Asked what she remembered from the night, she said: “The whole thing. The screaming, people screaming, begging for help.”

More than two months on Ms Alves’s family — who owned the flat — are living in a hotel and are still waiting until they are offered a permanent home.