Syrian brown bear cub at Armenian camera trap


This video says about itself:

Surprised bear cub in Armenia

17 July 2015

A young Syrian Brown Bear is surprised by a camera trap but soon musters enough courage to take a closer look.

From Wildlife Extra about this:

Rare footage of a Syrian Brown Bear surprised by a camera trap in Armenia

A rare young Syrian Brown Bear was taking a walk in the woods of Armenia’s Caucasus Wildlife Refuge when he came across a camera trap that first startled and then intrigued him.

The rare footage was caught by the Foundation for the Preservation of Wildlife and Cultural Assets (FPWC) on a camera installed with funding from the World Land Trust (WLT).

There are only around 150 Syrian Brown Bears surviving in Armenia and the populations are being monitored and their behaviour studied with the help of the camera traps.

In the Caucasus Refuge there are thought to be as few as two or three bears, which is also home to Bearded Vultures, Bezoar Goats and the endangered Caucasian Leopard.

The main threat facing Syrian Brown Bears in the area are habitat loss to agriculture, mining and quarries, and conflict with farmers over bee hives and fruit growing.

Two new areas of mountain habitat were recently purch[a]sed with the help of WLT, to further extend the potential safe havens for the bears.

Alaskan grizzly bears catching salmon on webcams


This video about Alaska is called The Land of Giant Bears | Full Documentary.

From eNature.com in the USA in July 2015:

Watch Live As Grizzlies Catch Salmon

Salmon are running in Alaska and Brooks Falls in Katmai National Park may be the best place to watch local bears gorge themselves on fresh caught salmon.

Explore.org has a number of webcams on the scene and you can almost always observe a bear or two (or three or four!) in action.

Brown bear bones discovery in the Netherlands


This video says about itself:

17 March 2014

The awe-inspiring brown bear lives in the forests and mountains of northern North America, Europe, and Asia. It is the most widely distributed bear in the world.

Translated from Staatsbosbeheer in the Netherlands:

Thursday, May 28, 2015 12:12

During recent archaeological field surveys in the dunes of the Kop van Schouwen bones of the brown bear were found by archaeologists of the AWN Association of Volunteers in Archaeology. This find is spectacular to mention, because since 1940 only a pierced bear’s tooth had been found in the province of Zeeland until now.

Living locally

A pierced bear’s tooth may have been brought as an amulet by people from elsewhere, but the discovery of the bones probably reflects the actual local occurrence of the brown bear. Expert Dick Mol ruled that the remains are indeed of a young brown bear.

Dated

When the bear was living in Zealand must still be precisely determined. Until now it was known that until the High Middle Ages (10th to 12th century) bears still lived in the Benelux countries. C14 dating can clarify the precise age of the bones.

See also here.

Abused Peruvian ex-circus bear’s rehabilitation


This video says about itself:

Cholita the bear takes her first steps to freedom!

1 May 2015

Cholita the ‘real-life Paddington bear‘ who was abused at the circus and captured the world’s hearts has taken her first steps to freedom with Animal Defenders International (ADI). The hairless bear was signed into the organisation’s custody and rescued in a two day mission. Cholita is now safe in the ADI ‘Spirit of Freedom’ rescue centre where she is receiving specialist care ahead of her flight to the United States where she will enjoy a new life along with 33 lions who have been rescued from circuses across Peru and Colombia by ADI.

Find out more about ADI’s campaign to save Cholita and our Operation Spirit of Freedom rescue here.

From Wildlife Extra:

Film footage show Cholita the abused ex-circus bear taking first steps to freedom

The abused circus bear Cholita rescued from a zoo in Peru by Animal Defenders International (ADI) has taken her first steps to freedom.

Cholita is an endangered Spectacled bear who was kept illegally by a circus. The stress and trauma of her living conditions has left Cholita suffering from severe hair loss – where she should have thick, black fur she has none, leaving her almost completely bald.

Other scars of her abusive past include fingers brutally cut down to stumps to remove her front claws, and broken teeth, leaving her defenceless.

She is now at the rescue centre in Peru where, for the first time in her life, she is nesting in straw, enjoying a natural diet including her favourite grapes, playing in her bath while being closely monitored to establish her level of health ahead of her flight to the United States where she will enjoy a new life along with 34 big cats who have been rescued from circuses across Peru and Colombia.

ADI President Jan Creamer said, “Cholita has taken her first steps to freedom and is clearly enjoying herself at the ADI rescue centre, making cosy deep straw nests and eating her favourite foods, especially grapes. She is elderly and quite frail so we are keeping her under close observation to monitor her health. With the public’s continuing and heartfelt response we can give this sweet bear the brighter future she deserves.”

Cholita was confiscated from a circus in Peru ten years ago and has been living in a zoo near Piura ever since, as no suitable permanent home could be found for her due to her poor health and lack of hair.

Peruvian authorities requested that ADI find a home for Cholita, along with the 33 lions and a tiger saved during the ADI Operation Spirit of Freedom rescue mission, planned for rehoming at The Wild Animal Sanctuary in the US. Over the past eight months ADI has assisted Peru’s wildlife officials with the enforcement of the country’s ban on wild animals in circuses, and has started the same process to save animals from Colombia’s circuses.

Cholita’s rescue brings the number of animals saved by ADI since August last year, to 79. ADI has worked with Peru’s authorities to raid circuses all over the country in the biggest rescue and enforcement operation of its kind. During the mission, the organisation has also saved dozens of monkeys and other animals from the illegal wildlife trade.

Grizzly bears in Washington state, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

Grizzly Bears in North Cascades: Recovering an Icon

20 March 2015

North Cascades National Park, considered the “wild nearby” for its incredible scenery and wildlife, is also at the center of an opportunity being led by the National Park Service, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and U.S. Forest Service to restore a grizzly bear population.

Recovering these rare bears to the North Cascades Ecosystem, an area of nearly 10,000 square miles of protected public land, including the national park, would be a gift of the natural world to ours and future generations. It also provides a rare opportunity to recover all of the large native wildlife that were present prior to the turn of the 19th century.

Grizzly bears, of which less than twenty likely remain in the North Cascades Ecosystem, have long been an important cultural symbol for local Native American tribes, as well as playing an important ecological role for the health of the environment and other animal species.

Join the National Parks Conservation Association and special guests, including TV host and bear specialist Chris Morgan, to learn more about grizzly bears, their importance to creating and maintaining healthy ecosystems, the history leading up to the current public process, and how you can get involved.

Panelists:
• Bill Gaines, Ph.D., Wildlife Ecologist and Director of the Washington Conservation Science Institute. Gaines has been involved in the grizzly bear recovery efforts in the North Cascades for the past 25 years.

• Chris Morgan, Ecologist, bear specialist, author, filmmaker and TV host. Chris has spent more than 20 years working as a wildlife researcher, wilderness guide, and environmental educator on every continent where bears exist.

• Joe Scott, International Conservation Director, Conservation Northwest

• Rob Smith, Northwest Regional Director, National Parks Conservation Association

Giant panda news update


This video is called Life of Giant Pandas – Full Documentary.

From Associated Press today:

China’s latest survey finds increase in wild giant pandas

BEIJING — Wild giant pandas in China are doing well.

The latest census by China’s State Forestry Administration shows the panda population has grown by 268 to a total of 1,864 since the last survey ending in 2003.

Nearly three quarters of the pandas live in the southwestern province of Sichuan. The remaining pandas have been found in the neighboring Shaanxi and Gansu provinces.

“The rise in the population of wild giant pandas is a victory for conservation and definitely one to celebrate,” said Ginette Hemley, senior vice president of wildlife conservation for World Wildlife Fund.

Hemley credited efforts by the Chinese government for the increase. The survey shows 1,246 wild giant pandas live within nature reserves. There are 67 panda reserves in China, an increase of 27 since the last survey.

“The survey result demonstrates the effectiveness of nature reserves in boosting wild giant panda numbers,” said Xiaohai Liu, executive program director for WWF-China.

But the survey also points to economic development as a main threat to the rare animal. It says 319 hydropower stations and 1,339 kilometers (832 miles) of roads have been built in the giant panda’s habitat.

WWF said it is the first time that large-scale infrastructure projects such as mining and railroads get referenced in the survey. Traditional threats such as poaching are on the decline, WWF noted.

China began surveying its giant pandas in the 1970s. The latest census began in 2011 and took three years to complete.

The number of giant pandas in captivity grew by 211, more than double the previous survey figure, according to the census released Saturday.