Black bear, feral cat in North Carolina, USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

9 November 2016

A wily feral cat and a big Black Bear share the same game trails at night high in the Great Smoky Mountains of North Carolina.

Grizzly bears using trees to remove winter coats


This video from North America says about itself:

Pole dancing bearsPlanet Earth II: Mountains Preview – BBC One

13 nov. 2016

Programme website: here. Camera traps reveal how grizzly bears rub against trees to scratch those hard to reach places.

Bears, other carnivores, as vegetarians


This video from Alaska says about itself:

2 Yearling Grizzly Bears with mother eating berries

I don’t think you call a bear that is as old as these cubs anymore. They look like at least yearlings. This was mid August of 2009 in Denali.

From eNature Blog in the USA:

Autumn’s Bounty Can Turn Some Carnivores Into Carb-loving Vegans!

Posted on Sunday, October 02, 2016 by eNature

What would you expect a Grizzly Bear to eat when fattening up for winter? Caribou? Salmon?

How about a nice fruit salad?

Yes, some of our most celebrated carnivores become vegetarians in the fall.

Even the largest terrestrial predator, the Grizzly Bear, turns into a berry specialist at this time of year. It feeds on Salmonberries, crowberries, elderberries, and numerous other species of berries.

In fact, one type of manzanita is called Bearberry because of its importance in the fall diet of bears.

Black Bears, which tend to be more herbivorous than Grizzlies, also load up on berries before the winter, and in areas where oak trees grow, these bears consume vast quantities of acorns, too. Not to mention apples, grapes and other fruit they may encounter in farms and gardens.

Even the Polar Bear, the most predatory of all the bears, feeds on berries when they’re available.

And It’s More Than Bears Who Go Vegan

Coyotes and foxes follow a similar pattern, dining on a broad range of fruits during the fall. The superb climbing ability of the Common Gray Fox offers it access to berries and other fruits growing in places inaccessible to coyotes and bears. Wolves, too, will eat berries in the fall, though these seldom constitute a significant portion of their diet.

At first glance, it seems odd that these large “meat eaters” would consume fruits at a time when their need for stored fats and proteins is paramount. Research, however, reveals that the carbohydrates found in fruits are easily converted into fats when eaten in large quantities.

What are your local animals doing to prepared for winter? Have you seen any seemingly unusual behavior or obvious preparation taking place?

We always enjoy your stories!

Bees, bears, honey in Japan


This video says about itself:

Honey-trapping Bears – Wild Japan – BBC

20 July 2016

This beekeeper has found a humane way of preventing bears from stealing honey, and with the help of local conservationists, relocate the bears to safer areas.

Black bear family in the USA, video


This video from the USA says about itself:

Black Bear Mother And Cubs

1 June 2016

The precious Black Bear family visits the deck about once a week as they patrol their large territory of probably several square miles. As long as one doesn’t leave out high protein food like suet they will spend a few minutes checking out a few leftover bird seeds and then move on without any fuss or trouble.

Orphaned baby bears saved in Romania


This video from Romania says about itself:

26 February 2016

The Asociatia Milioane de Prieteni set out to rescue bears suffering cruelty in the entertainment industry – but just occasionally, they’re called upon to act for wild bears too. When rangers reported two tiny abandoned cubs found in a forest near Brasov, our partners leapt into action, ensuring they had the best possible chance of pulling through.

From Wildlife Extra on this:

Tiny baby bears rescued from forest in Romania

Head of UK Campaigns at World Animal Protection, Alyx Elliott, said: ‘Forest Rangers had found a bear den with the cubs which seemed to have been abandoned. They monitored the den for a few days and when there was no sign of the mother bear returning they knew they needed urgent care and decided to bring them to the AMP sanctuary. It is sadly probable that the mother bear had been shot and killed.

In the wild, mother bears can nurse their cubs for up to two years. Without her, these two babies will require special support and diligent monitoring if they are to survive. Luckily they’re now in the right place, which is why World Animal Protection has been funding the sanctuary for many years.

Many of the rescued bears at the Romanian sanctuary have been freed from zoos or other captive environments and they simply can’t be released into the wild. But, it is hoped that these beautiful cubs can one day return to their natural habitat.’