Reddish egret video


This video says about itself:

Reddish Egret

20 July 2016

Video by Kris Wiktor/Shutterstock.

Reddish egrets live in north and central America.

North American shorebirds’ migration


This video from Kansas in the USA says about itself:

Half of All North American Shorebirds Use This Rest Stop

18 November 2016

Cheyenne Bottoms is the nation’s largest inland marsh, an area of over 60 square miles. It’s also the favored resting spot of many species of migrating birds, from pelicans to 27 species of ducks.

From: AERIAL AMERICA: The Great Plains.

Painted buntings on migration


This video from the USA says about itself:

15 November 2016

Spectacular Painted Buntings – the most colorful songbirds in North America – have returned on their winter 2016 -2017 migration. They first started passing through in late October and the first mature males have recently been spotted. Always exciting to see while dozens pass through the Backyard on their way further south usually only about 4 to 8 spend the winter here and stay until April.

Grizzly bears using trees to remove winter coats


This video from North America says about itself:

Pole dancing bearsPlanet Earth II: Mountains Preview – BBC One

13 nov. 2016

Programme website: here. Camera traps reveal how grizzly bears rub against trees to scratch those hard to reach places.

American goldfinch sings


This video from the USA says about itself:

9 October 2016

Bold and brilliant male American Goldfinch in prime summer colors which are now fading fast as winter approaches. Easy to film around feeders they are much more difficult to catch in pensive relaxing moments like this. They tend to spend time in heavy cover when not feeding.
The American goldfinch (Spinus tristis), also known as the eastern goldfinch or “lightning bird,” is a small North American bird in the finch family. It is migratory, ranging from mid-Alberta to North Carolina during the breeding season, and from just south of the Canada–United States border to Mexico during the winter.

The only finch in its subfamily to undergo a complete molt, the American goldfinch displays sexual dimorphism in its coloration; the male is a vibrant yellow in the summer and an olive color during the winter, while the female is a dull yellow-brown shade which brightens only slightly during the summer. The male displays brightly colored plumage during the breeding season to attract a mate.

Berries give woodpeckers red feathers


This video from the USA says about itself:

4 May 2014

Northern, or Yellow shafted Flicker, Colaptes auratus, preening, drinking, bathing, eating berries, showing aggression.

From Science News:

Berries may give yellow woodpeckers a red dye job

by Helen Thompson

3:34pm, October 17, 2016

To the bafflement of birders, yellow-shafted flickers (Colaptes auratus auratus) sometimes sport red or orange wing feathers.

Scientists have suggested that the birds, which inhabit eastern North America, might be products of genetic variation affecting the carotenoid pigments that produce their flight-feather colors. Alternatively, the birds might be hybrids from mixing with a subspecies that lives in the west, red-shafted flickers (Colaptes auratus cafer). Despite decades of study, no clear-cut explanation has emerged.

It turns out that diet may be to blame. Jocelyn Hudon of the Royal Alberta Museum in Canada and her colleagues tested the red flight feathers from two yellow-shafted flickers and found traces of rhodoxanthin, a deep red pigment found in plants, and a potential metabolite. This suggests that the birds’ bodies break down rhodoxanthin — a clue that the pigment enters the body through food.  Spectral and biochemical tests of feathers from museum collections also point to rhodoxanthin and suggest that the pigment may mess with yellow carotenoid production as well.

Yellow-shafted flickers probably pick up the red pigment when they eat berries from invasive honeysuckle plants, which contain the ruby pigment and produce similar red hues in other birds, the researchers write October 12 in The Auk. The plants also happen to produce berries just around the time that flickers molt their flight feathers.

Bears, other carnivores, as vegetarians


This video from Alaska says about itself:

2 Yearling Grizzly Bears with mother eating berries

I don’t think you call a bear that is as old as these cubs anymore. They look like at least yearlings. This was mid August of 2009 in Denali.

From eNature Blog in the USA:

Autumn’s Bounty Can Turn Some Carnivores Into Carb-loving Vegans!

Posted on Sunday, October 02, 2016 by eNature

What would you expect a Grizzly Bear to eat when fattening up for winter? Caribou? Salmon?

How about a nice fruit salad?

Yes, some of our most celebrated carnivores become vegetarians in the fall.

Even the largest terrestrial predator, the Grizzly Bear, turns into a berry specialist at this time of year. It feeds on Salmonberries, crowberries, elderberries, and numerous other species of berries.

In fact, one type of manzanita is called Bearberry because of its importance in the fall diet of bears.

Black Bears, which tend to be more herbivorous than Grizzlies, also load up on berries before the winter, and in areas where oak trees grow, these bears consume vast quantities of acorns, too. Not to mention apples, grapes and other fruit they may encounter in farms and gardens.

Even the Polar Bear, the most predatory of all the bears, feeds on berries when they’re available.

And It’s More Than Bears Who Go Vegan

Coyotes and foxes follow a similar pattern, dining on a broad range of fruits during the fall. The superb climbing ability of the Common Gray Fox offers it access to berries and other fruits growing in places inaccessible to coyotes and bears. Wolves, too, will eat berries in the fall, though these seldom constitute a significant portion of their diet.

At first glance, it seems odd that these large “meat eaters” would consume fruits at a time when their need for stored fats and proteins is paramount. Research, however, reveals that the carbohydrates found in fruits are easily converted into fats when eaten in large quantities.

What are your local animals doing to prepared for winter? Have you seen any seemingly unusual behavior or obvious preparation taking place?

We always enjoy your stories!