Moroccan women not convicted for wearing miniskirts


Moroccan women demonstrate for the right to wear miniskirts

Translated from NOS TV in the Netherlands:

No punishment for wearing miniskirt in Morocco

Today, 14:18

Two young women who were prosecuted because they wore miniskirts in Morocco at a market have been acquitted. The judge found that they have committed no offense. The prosecutor had already called for acquittal.

The women of 23 and 26 years old were harrassed in the town Inezgane by two boys. They thought, like some market vendors, that the women behaved immorally by their way of dressing. When the women called the police, not their assailants were arrested, but they themselves.

The arrest sparked uproar in Morocco. In several cities, people took to the streets to demonstrate for more freedom. Men and women put photos on the Internet of themselves in skirts. They called the persecution of the women an attack on individual freedom and gender equality.

The public prosecution department will now consider whether they will prosecute the two boys for assault.

See also here.

Moroccan women protest anti-miniskirt policies


This French language video is about a 6 July 2015 demonstration by women in Tunis, Tunisia, for the right to wear a miniskirt.

After a maxiskirt ban in Belgium and France … and after a shorts ban for women in Israel … after miniskirt bans in Italy, New York City, and Hungary … now Morocco.

From Morocco World News:

Moroccan Women Wear Mini-skirts in Protest Against Arrest of Two Women

Saturday 27 June 2015 – 09:52

Rabat- Many Moroccan women are publishing pictures of themselves wearing mini-skirts to show solidarity with two women facing charges of “gross indecency”.

Several Moroccan women turned out for the protest against the arrest of two women in Inezgane, a suburb of the southern city of Agadir. The two women were arrested “gross indecency” for wearing “tight and immoral” clothes.

Women participating in the virtual protest posted pictures of themselves on social media wearing miniskirts to support the two women—hairdressers aged 23 and 29– whose trial has been set for July 16.

“Although I believe that online campaigns do not result in a significant impact, but I decided to participate in solidarity with the two victims, and also because I myself suffer from harassment when I wear short clothes,” one woman who participated in the campaign told news website Hespress.

“Wearing a skirt is not an offence against the society’s public morals and does not question its history and traditions,” another woman told the Arabic-speaking website. It is a component of identity and a symbol of femininity that has existed since ages.”

“What has changed is the way we look at women which must be changed because women are part of the process of building the country and not a subject of guardianship. Criminalizing the wearing of skirts will only lead to the legitimization of violence against women,” she added.

Three sit-ins are also expected to be held this week in Agadir, Rabat and Casablanca to denounce the trial of the two women.

Two Facebook pages have been created to support the ordeal of the two young women. In both of them, many Moroccan women share pictures of themselves wearing minis-skirts with the hash tag “mettre une robe n’est pas un crime (wearing a skirt is not crime).

Yesterday, 6 July 2015, the two women appeared in court. There were solidarity demonstrations with them in various Moroccan cities.

An Internet petition supporting the right of Moroccan women to wear miniskirts is here.

Opposition to miniskirts is colonialist: Zimbabwe vice president: here.

The Great Bustard: Past, Present and Future of a Globally Threatened Species


Originally posted on North African Birds:

Alonso, J.C. 2014. The Great Bustard: Past, Present and Future of a Globally Threatened Species. Ornis Hungarica 22(2): 1–13.  DOI: 10.2478/orhu-2014-0014

Abstract & Full Text PDF (Open Access):

Great Bustards are still vulnerable to agricultural intensification, power line collision, and other human-induced landscape changes. Their world population is estimated to be between 44,000 and 57,000 individuals, showing a stable demographic trend at present in the Iberian peninsula, its main stronghold, but uncertain trends in Russia and China, and alarming declines in Iran and Morocco, where it will go extinct if urgent protection measures are not taken immediately. Our knowledge of the behaviour and ecology of this species has increased considerably over the last three decades, allowing us to control the major threats and secure its conservation in an appropriately managed cereal farmland. This species became ‘The Bird of the Year’ in Hungary in 2014.

Except from the…

View original 114 more words

Swifts on their way to Europe


This video from the Netherlands says about itself:

One of the birds of a pair of Swifts breeding on three eggs in one of my nest boxes just entered with some nesting material. Recorded May 28th 2012.

The British Trust for Ornithology reports, on Twitter today, about Morocco:

European Swifts flying high over Marrakech. They are on their way!!!!

Winter Distribution of Passerine Richness in the Maghreb (North Africa): A Conservation Assessment


Originally posted on North African Birds:

Tellería, J. L., Fandos, G., López, J. F., Onrubia, A., & Refoyo, P. (2014). Winter Distribution of Passerine Richness in the Maghreb (North Africa): A Conservation Assessment. Ardeola 61: 335–350.  doi:10.13157/arla.61.2.2014.335
PDF in ResearchGate.net

Summary:

This paper studies the factors affecting passerine (Order Passeriformes) species richness in the Western Maghreb, a region at the southwestern border of the Palearctic reputed as a primary wintering ground for many common European birds. The effect of productivity, temperature, landscape structure and geographical location on bird richness was explored at 220 localities across Morocco. The models resulting from multivariate analyses supported the effects of productivity, temperature and landscape cover on bird richness, with higher numbers of species occurring in warm farmlands of the northwest. The most suitable areas for birds avoided the cold and arid expanses of the Atlas Mountains and the Sahara and overlapped with the most human-impacted sectors. Within these…

View original 33 more words

‘White’ whimbrel in Morocco


This video says about itself:

Whimbrel at The Lizard in Cornwall

The whimbrel is a large wading bird. It has longish legs and a long bill that curves near the tip. It is brownish above and whitish below. In flight, it shows a white ‘V’ shape up its back from its tail. In the UK, this species only breeds in north Scotland. It is a passage migrant to other areas in spring and autumn on its way from and to its wintering areas in South Africa. The Shetland and Orkney breeding population has been slowly increasing.

WHERE TO SEE THEM

You could see breeding birds on a visit to Shetland or Orkney in summer. Otherwise, passage migrants can be seen on the coast and sometimes inland in suitable habitat, when hearing its distinctive call can be the best clue to its presence.

WHEN TO SEE THEM

Mid-April to August

WHAT THEY EAT

On breeding grounds insects, snails and slugs; on passage, crabs, shrimps, molluscs, worms.

Filmed in May 2010 at The Lizard

Video Produced by Paul Dinning – Wildlife in Cornwall

From Moroccan Birds blog, with photos there:

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Leucistic Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) still at El Jadida since October 2014

Can a non-marked wader be relocated months after first sighting? Well, this is possible in some few cases including when the bird is leucistic and is alone in the region (so easily identifiable).

This is the case of a leucistic Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus) photographed for the first time in the intertidal zone between El Jadida and Sidi Bouzid by Ruth García Gorria on 17 October 2014.

On 13 February 2015, Ruth [García Gorria] relocated the leucistic bird again and took the photographs below (click on the pictures for more details). Ruth also commented that “the plumage is much whiter now” (compare the pictures below with those taken in October 2014 by clicking the link above).

On the other hand, the partially leucistic Common Coot (Fulica atra) is always present in Sidi Moussa lagoon where it was first observed and photographed in October and November 2014 by Ruth.

Rare gulls in Morocco


This video says about itself:

Glaucous Gull, Adult, Newlyn Harbour, Cornwall, 18/02/2012

Glaucous Gulls are regular visitors to West Cornwall, but adults are few and far between. This one is a very confident individual, hanging around the harbour waiting for free hand-outs from the local fishermen. It’s an easy life for some!!!

From the Go-South blog:

19 February 2015 – Rare Gulls at Essaouira

Two rare gulls at Oued Ksob seen by Dominic Mitchell: a second-calendar-year Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus) on 14 February and a third-calendar-year Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) the next day [probably the same bird seen in December and January in Essaouira harbour]. … photos appear in Dominic’s blog at www.birdingetc.com.

Great black-backed gulls are not that rare in western Europe, eg the Netherlands. However, they are in Morocco. While glaucous gulls are common in Arctic Svalbard, but not in western Europe, and certainly not in Morocco.