Wolffish, wolf eel video


This video says about itself:

21 April 2017

They have big, sharp teeth, long eel-like bodies, and they look like they could bite your fingers right off—but Jonathan can pet them. They’re Wolffish, and Jonathan visits both Atlantic and Pacific species. You won’t believe the amazing encounters he has with these friendly but mean-looking fish.

Sea otter tool use, new research


This video from the USA says about itself:

26 May 2016

An abalone can be pretty hard to pry off a rock. Just ask a sea otter! But if there’s a handy stone nearby? Good luck abalone!

See how our researchers study the way sea otters use tools: here.

An otter fuels its fast metabolism by eating up to a quarter of its weight in food a day. (A 150-pound person would have to eat 35 to 40 pounds of food a day to match that!)

A sea otter may hunt on the seafloor, but always returns to the surface to eat. Floating there on its back, it uses its chest as a table. (And if dinner’s a crab or clam, the otter may use a rock to crack open its prey.)

An otter’s coat has pockets—pouches of loose skin under each forearm. An otter uses them to stash prey during a dive, which leaves its paws free to hunt some more.

From Science News:

Tool use in sea otters doesn’t run in the family

by Helen Thompson

8:44pm, March 21, 2017

Aside from being adorable, sea otters and Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins share an ecological feat: Both species use tools. Otters crack open snails with rocks, and dolphins carry cone-shaped sponges to protect their snouts while scavenging for rock dwelling fish.

Researchers have linked tool use in dolphins to a set of differences in mitochondrial DNA — which passes from mother to offspring — suggesting that tool-use behavior may be inherited. Biologist Katherine Ralls of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., and her colleagues looked for a similar pattern in otters off the California coast. The team tracked diet (primarily abalone, crab, mussels, clams, urchins or snails) and tool use in the wild and analyzed DNA from 197 individual otters.

Otters that ate lots of hard-shelled snails — and used tools most frequently — rarely shared a common pattern in mitochondrial DNA, nor were they more closely related to other tool-users than any other otter in the population.

Unlike dolphins, sea otters may all be predisposed to using tools because their ancestors probably lived off mollusks, which required cracking open. However, modern otters only take up tools when their diet requires them, the researchers report March 21 in Biology Letters.

Pacific sharks on video


This video says about itself:

Thousands Of Sharks Visit A Sea Mount – Blue Planet – BBC Earth

27 January 2017

In the Pacific, a tiny island 300 miles away from the shore hides a giant mountain beneath the waves that forms a home for thousands of plankton feeding fish. These fish attract tuna, and the tuna attract thousands of sharks. Watch this video to learn more about this fascinating food chain, and hear some weird but true facts about the visiting hammerhead sharks..

Taken From Blue Planet Series 1.

Giant Pacific octopus video


This video from the USA says about itself:

6 January 2017

In this epic adventure taking place on two coasts, Jonathan investigates the world’s largest octopus, the Giant Pacific Octopus! He begins by meeting Sy, one of the octopuses at the New England Aquarium in Boston with cold water aquarist Bill Murphy.

Then Jonathan and Bill travel to the Seattle Aquarium to two of their octopuses Lucy and Odie with Seattle Aquarium aquarist Kathryn Kegel. Bill and Jonathan join Kathryn and her team on some dives in Puget Sound to survey wild octopus populations. Along the way, Jonathan witnesses an incredible octopus fight and gets a small glimpse into the social lives of the Giant Pacific Octopus!

Spawning mandarinfish video


This video says about itself:

16 December 2016

Even experienced divers rarely get to see the Mandarinfish, a colorful reef fish that is so shy, it only comes out of hiding for a half-hour a day. Jonathan travels to the south Pacific to film spawning Mandarinfish and witnesses an incredible secret ritual.

Clownfish on video


This video says about itself:

18 November 2016

Thanks to the Disney/Pixar movie Finding Nemo, virtually everyone has heard of the clownfish. Jonathan travels the Pacific to investigate the behavior of real clownfish. Even though they don’t actually talk in real life, they are beautiful and fascinating fish to observe.

JONATHAN BIRD‘S BLUE WORLD is an Emmy Award-winning underwater science/adventure program that airs on public television in the United States.

Marine animals helping each other, video


This video says about itself:

Jonathan Bird’s Blue World: Cleaning Stations (HD)

22 April 2016

Jonathan explores cleaning stations on the reef, where animals get cleaned of parasites and infection by other animals. Some examples shown are anemones and anemonefish (clownfish), wrasses, shrimp, manta rays, moray eels, Goliath groupers, sea turtles and barracuda. This episode was filmed in many locations such as Malaysia, the Philippines, Yap, Australia’s Great Barrier Reef and the Caribbean.