New Triassic marine reptile species discovery


This 2012 video, in Italian, is about Lariosaurus valceresii and Lariosaurus balsami Triassic marine reptiles.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Amateur paleontologist finds skull of prehistoric reptile

Today, 06:05

Never before the animal had been found in the Netherlands; Lariosaurus. Now a 4.5 centimeter skull of the flippered fish-eater has been found in a quarry in Winterswijk.

Amateur paleontologist Remco Bleeker was the lucky one who found the skull. Bleeker, in everyday life a concrete repairer, is pleased with the find. …

Bleeker brought the skull for examination to Germany, where it was found that it was a Lariosaurus.

Muschelkalk

In the quarry at Winterswijk Triassic limestone is extracted from rock layers from the Triassic geological period some 240 million years ago. In the quarry Bleeker also once found a peculiar fossil of a toothy marine animal. This fossil, which was seen by experts as a missing link was even named after him: the Palatodonta bleekeri.

The skull of the lariosaurus has been given the name of the hamlet where it was found. “The first is named after me. Now it was time to honor the quarry,” says Bleeker, who gave his find on loan to Museum TwentseWelle.

The name of the newly discovered species is Lariosaurus vosseveldensis; after Vosseveld hamlet.

See also here.

The scientific description of the new species is here.

Triceratops dinosaur expedition video


This 14 June 2016 video is from Naturalis museum in Leiden in the Netherlands. It shows how a paleontologist prepares to go to Wyoming in the USA for excavating Triceratops dinosaur fossils.

‘Meteorite killed not only dinosaurs, also most mammals’


This video says about itself:

The Day the Mesozoic Died: The Asteroid That Killed the DinosaursHHMI BioInteractive Video

26 August 2014

Ever wonder why the dinosaurs disappeared? HHMI BioInteractive investigates the cause of the mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous period—and the clues come from paleontology, chemistry, physics, and biology.

This three-act film tells the story of the extraordinary detective work that solved one of the greatest scientific mysteries of all time. Explore the fossil evidence of these prehistoric animals, and other organisms that went extinct, through this lively educational video.

From daily The Independent in Britain today:

Prehistoric asteroid wiped out nearly all mammals as well as dinosaurs, research suggests

‘More data shows the extinction was more severe than previously believed’

Jack Hardy

Nearly every species of mammal was eradicated by the prehistoric asteroid which wiped out the dinosaurs, research suggests.

Around 93% of mammal species were made extinct by the strike, which took place in the Cretaceous period, more than 66 million years ago.

Examination of fossil records by scientists from the University of Bath determined that the asteroid’s impact had been much more severe than previously thought.

Past estimates have been much lower because some of the rarer species that were killed left a smaller fossil record, researchers said.

The University of Bath’s Dr Nick Longrich said: “The species that are most vulnerable to extinction are the rare ones, and because they are rare, their fossils are less likely to be found.

“The species that tend to survive are more common, so we tend to find them.

“The fossil record is biased in favour of the species that survived. As bad as things looked before, including more data shows the extinction was more severe than previously believed.”

It was also found the asteroid’s catastrophic effect for life on Earth was mitigated by species recovering rapidly.

Within 300,000 years, the number of species on the planet was double the amount that had existed before the mass extinction.

Due to the lack of sustenance resulting from the widespread destruction of vegetation and animals, it is thought that the largest living animal during the period would have been about the size of a cat.

Dr Longrich added: “Because mammals did so well after the extinction, we have tended to assume that it didn’t hit them as hard.

“However, our analysis shows that the mammals were hit harder than most groups of animals, such as lizards, turtles, crocodilians, but they proved to be far more adaptable in the aftermath.

“It wasn’t low extinction rates, but the ability to recover and adapt in the aftermath that led the mammals to take over.”

Researchers analysed all known mammal species in North America from the end of the Cretaceous period to draw their conclusions.

The findings were published in the Journal of Evolutionary Biology.

Giant snakes, extinct and living


This 8 June 2016 video is called Have you ever seen them? Giant Snakes in the world | Giant Anaconda, Python, Titanoboa.

Tyrannosaur in Dutch museum’s name is Trix


This 2015 Dutch video is about the Tyrannosaurus rex which is now in Naturalis museum in Leiden in the Netherlands.

The Tyrannosaurus rex, excavated in Montana in the USA in 2013, will be exhibited in Naturalis from 10 September 2016 on.

This dinosaur is said to be ‘an old lady’.

Today, Dutch NOS TV reports that her name will be Trix. An abbreviation of Beatrix, the name of Princess Beatrix, ex-queen of the Netherlands.

See also here.

New Triassic fossil fish discovery in the Netherlands


Saurichthys fossil from China

Translated from Leidsch Dagblad daily in the Netherlands:

Billfish in Naturalis museum

Leiden – Naturalis has acquired a fossil of a new species which must have lived 200 to 250 million years ago. The billfish-like fish (Saurichthys diannae) was found by amateur paleontologist Herman Winkelhorst in the quarry of Winterswijk.

By Wilfred Simons – 27-5-2016, 17:36 (Update 27-5-2016, 17:36)

At the time, that area was in a coastal zone of the Tethys sea. That these billfish used to live also just offshore in shallow water, is proven by the fact that their eyes pointed upwards.

Winkelhof [sic; Winkelhorst] discovered a “graveyard” of about thirty young fish of the newly discovered species. That indicates that the sea at Winterswijk may have been a breeding ground for young life, like the current Wadden Sea. The amateur paleontologist donated the fossil to Naturalis.

See also here.

Tyrannosaurus rex, by David Attenborough


This video, recorded in the USA, says about itself:

What Was Tyrannosaurus rex Like? – #Attenborough90BBC

25 May 2016

Sir David visits the Museum of Colorado to talk to Robert T. Bakker, who explains some of what he has learnt about the Tyrannosaurus rex.