US police kill over 1000 people in 2016


This video says about itself:

17 December 2016

So far this year, 1000 people have been killed by the police in the United States and Black people and Indigenous people have been disproportionately targeted.

US police killed more than 1,150 in 2016: here.

OKLAHOMA OFFICER WHO KILLED TERENCE CRUTCHER FOUND NOT GUILTY OF MANSLAUGHTER “The white police officer who fatally shot Terence Crutcher, an unarmed black man whose car stalled in the middle of the road in Tulsa, Oklahoma last year, was found not guilty of first-degree murder on Wednesday evening.” [HuffPost]

Seattle police fatally shot a knife-wielding woman who called for help. See also here.

Advertisements

13 thoughts on “US police kill over 1000 people in 2016

  1. Pingback: US police kill over 1000 people in 2016 — Dear Kitty. Some blog | The Modern [AfroIndio] Times

  2. Pingback: Nearly 2,000 ´arrest-related deaths´ annually in the USA | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  3. With Charleena Lyles, Another Life Lost Due to Excessive Force by Police

    As you know, a 30-year old, reportedly pregnant Black woman in Seattle named Charleena Lyles was killed this weekend by police, who said she was wielding a knife. Lyles had called the police because she thought a burglar was in her home.

    This devastating story comes on the heels of a jury in Minnesota acquitting St. Anthony Police Officer Jeronimo Yanez of second-degree manslaughter and two counts of intentionally discharging a dangerous weapon for fatally shooting Philando Castile, an unarmed Black man, during a roadside encounter in July 2016. The Castile killing – narrated on Facebook in real time by his girlfriend as she sat next to him in the car – was one of the most devastating incidents of police killing we have seen over the past few years. The Yanez acquittal follows the acquittal of Officer Betty Shelby in the killing of Terrence Crutcher in Tulsa, Oklahoma last month.

    Both these cases starkly demonstrate the challenge we face in seeking to hold officers accountable. Neither the issue of racial profiling, nor evidence about how race affected the assumption of dangerousness of the two men killed by the officers, were presented in these cases. Castile had been stopped 46 times by local police in the years before his death. Officer Yanez’s explanation for why he stopped Castile was clearly influenced by race, as was his unwarranted “fear” of Castile who was accompanied by his girlfriend and her 4 year-old daughter. Likewise, in Tulsa, Officer Shelby’s sense of the “dangerousness” of Terrence Crutcher and the jury’s willingness to credit it, were most likely powerfully influenced by race. And yet race was never mentioned in either of these cases.

    You may have also heard about several groups that have filed suit against the Chicago Police Department. You will see more of these suits as those of us working on these issues, including LDF, prepare lawsuits against police departments in an effort to obtain judicial consent decrees through litigation (as we and other civil rights groups did in New York) rather than through the Department of Justice investigation process. In places where we have consent decrees, like Baltimore, we are reviewing proposals of those seeking to serve as enforcement monitors and we are offering technical assistance to local community groups to play an active role in monitoring and enforcement.

    Finally, while the list of victims of excessive force seems to grow every day with new names like Charleena Lyles, we are working to lay the foundation for the creation of avenues through which evidence and issues of race can be introduced into criminal prosecutions and civil cases against police officers for use of excessive force. We are determined, despite our disappointment in these verdicts, to work towards transforming how our legal system deals with these cases. We know that accountability is an essential part of any lasting reform. We fight on!

    Best,

    Sherrilyn A. Ifill
    President and Director-Counsel

  4. Pingback: United States police kill Australian woman veterinarian | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  5. Wednesday 26th July 2016

    posted by Morning Star in Britain

    THE number of fatal shootings by police in England and Wales is at the highest level for more than a decade, according to new figures from the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) yesterday.

    Six deaths, including that of Westminster attacker Khalid Masood, were recorded in 2016- 17, the largest annual number recorded since the count started in 2004.

    There were also 28 deaths related to police pursuits of vehicles, the highest since 2005-06. Two thirds of the people who died were passengers, bystanders or other road users.

    Police chiefs and the IPCC are to examine whether changes to police pursuit safety or training are needed.

    The report also showed that 14 adults died in or after police custody, with a further 55 apparently dying by suicide following police custody, although this was the lowest figure since 2012-13.

    The figures come after campaigners held a vigil for Londoner Rashan Charles, who died after a police pursuit on Saturday.

    http://morningstaronline.co.uk/a-4b81-Police-shot-dead-6-in-a-year,-IPCC-figures-reveal#.WXhN41FpwdU

  6. Pingback: Donald Trump using homophobia for autocracy | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  7. Pingback: Trump militarises United States police | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  8. Pingback: Trump pardons racist Arizona sheriff Arpaio | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  9. Pingback: United States police kill LGBTQ student activist | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  10. Pingback: Trump’s war on American football, update | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  11. Pingback: Donald Trump’s war on American football, why? | Dear Kitty. Some blog

  12. Pingback: Anti-racist American footballer Kaepernick fights injustice | Dear Kitty. Some blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s