Ugandan homophobic law and United States religious fundamentalists


This video from the USA says about itself:

Anti-Gay Fervor in Uganda Tied to Right-Wing U.S. Evangelicals, Part 1 of 2

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Human rights activists in Uganda are warning that the lives of gay people are in danger after a newspaper published a front-page story featuring the names and photographs of what it called Uganda’s 100 “top” gays and lesbians alongside a yellow banner that read “Hang Them.” We look at the ties of the anti-gay movement in Uganda to the far-right evangelical movement here in the United States with Jeff Sharlet, author of “C Street: The Fundamentalist Threat to American Democracy“.

This video is called Anti-Gay Fervor in Uganda Tied to Right-Wing U.S. Evangelicals, Part 2 of 2.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Gay Ugandans now face life behind bars

Friday 20th December 2013

Parliament passes law punishing ‘aggravated homosexuality’

Uganda’s parliament passed an anti-gay law that punishes “aggravated homosexuality” with life imprisonment.

The Bill drew widespread condemnation when it was introduced in 2010 and included the death penalty, but that was removed from the revised version passed by parliament.

Homosexuality was already illegal under a law from the British colonial era that criminalised sexual acts “against the order of nature.”

The new law was introduced as a private member’s Bill by an MP who claimed tougher legislation was needed to deter Western homosexuals he accused of “recruiting” Ugandan children.

Gay Ugandans accused political and religious leaders of coming under the influence of fundamentalist US Christians who want to spread their campaign of anti-gay hatred in Africa.

Campaign group Sexual Minorities Uganda is suing US evangelical Scott Lively for crimes against humanity under the Alien Tort Statute, a law allowing non-citizens to bring lawsuits in the US for alleged violations of international law.

Mr Lively‘s Abiding Truth Ministries has been classed as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, a leading US civil rights watchdog.

He spoke at a 2009 conference on the “gay agenda” and the “threat” of homosexuality which triggered a wave of anti-gay hatred.

MP David Bahati tabled his new Bill in the aftermath of the conference, while the Ugandan media began publicly outing gay people so that they could be arrested or killed.

Gay rights activist David Kato was beaten to death in 2011, shortly after the Rolling Stone newspaper had published his photo and called for him to be executed.

Mr Lively denies having a hand in writing the new law, which rolls back years of progress in defence of gay Ugandans’ rights. Gay activists held their first Pride parade in 2012.

Amid international criticism, the Bill was repeatedly shelved despite the protests of Ugandan MPs.

Days before Christmas last year, parliamentary speaker Rebecca Kadaga threatened to pass the anti-gay law as a “Christmas gift” to all Ugandans.

Ugandan Archbishop Approves Hate-Gays Law in Christmas Church Message: here.

USA: Raw Story’s five biggest anti-LGBT A-holes of 2013: here.

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11 thoughts on “Ugandan homophobic law and United States religious fundamentalists

  1. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
    Since I heard about this law and the US religious fundamentalists role in it’s passing or their involvement with this, I always thought that it’s an experiment …. see how well it works there and how to bring it to the USA. Intention …. stop the wave of states that have approved marriage equality. I sure hope I’m wrong!!!
    Going back to the painful, hurtful times when you had to “hide” who you were and who you loved!! SMH ……

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