Muslim woman reacts to Nice atrocity


This video from the USA says about itself:

American Muslim Reacts To Attack In France

15 July 2016

Thom talks to caller Rachel, who is an American Muslim, about the recent attack in France and why terrorists are criminals who do not represent her religion.

What Rachel says may help to counter Islamophobic propaganda in the corporate media, now after the Nice crime, and already earlier.

However, neither Rachel nor others of the non-violent majority of Muslims have any absolute moral duty to publicly dissociate themselves from the Nice bloodbath; or from ISIS (not connected to the Nice bloodbath according to French police). Like in the case of non-Muslims, the media should presume that they reject this kind of atrocity, unless someone explicitly contradicts that.

When neo-fascist Anders Behring Breivik called himself a ‘conservative Christian’ on the Internet, and then proceeded with his bloodbaths in Oslo and on Utøya island in Norway, I did not hear anyone demand that all ‘conservative Christians’, or all Christians for that matter, should immediately in the sharpest possible way condemn Breivik; or else would be suspect of being accomplices, subject to jailing or deportation.

When Israeli ultra-Orthodox Jew Yishai Schlissel murdered 16-year-old Israeli girl Shira Banki and wounded five others for demonstrating against discrimination of LGBTQ people in Jerusalem, I did not hear anyone demand that all ‘ultra-Orthodox’ Jews, or all Jews for that matter, should immediately in the sharpest possible way condemn Mr Schlissel; or else would be suspect of being accomplices, subject to jailing or deportation (maybe some-anti-Semites demanded that). Many people, including me, would regard such a reaction to Schlissel’s crime as anti-Semitism.

While the crime in Nice is similar in its bloodiness to these two crimes, it is really different ideologically.

Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, the local truck driver who extremely probably was the perpetrator of the bloodbath in Nice, and was shot dead by police, used to drink alcohol.

Translation of what Mr Bouhlel’s next door neighbour said to France 3 TV station:

he is convinced that the attack has nothing to do with Islam. “He has nothing to do with religion, he does not pray, he does not observe Ramadan. He is a depressed man who is in divorce. He lives alone and has financial problems.”

Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, Driver In Nice Attack, Wasn’t ‘Stable Psychologically,’ Family Says. The 31-year-old reportedly had no known ties to terror groups: here.

It seems that Mr Bouhlel is rather similar in some ways to the German pilot Andreas Lubitz who committed suicide by flying his plane against a French mountain, killing the passengers and crew. The link of Andreas Lubitz to Christianity, Lutheran Christianity in his case, seems to be a bit stronger than any link between Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel and Islam. As far as I know, not anyone has blamed Mr Lubitz’ suicide cum mass murder on Lutheranism; correctly so. The media should discuss the Nice bloodbath similarly.

On Twitter from Britain today:

Just had to remove graffiti at work that said “KILL ALL MUSLIMS AND CORBYN“.

Letter from Nice: The West is learning all the wrong lessons from the latest atrocity. What we witnessed in Nice was harrowing, and the response only adds to the tragedy: here.

Inside the ghettos, Muslims are fed up with being blamed for the violence of others because of a shared religion. Disaffected young Muslims in Nice insist they share nothing in common with Lahouaiej Bouhlel but they rail against the humiliations they regularly endure because of their religion: here.

Dutch Rob Wijnberg on Nice and other attacks: here.

Munich shooting: Gunman Ali David Sonboly was ‘obsessed’ with mass killings, say police. Authorities believe 18-year-old German-Iranian wanted to mark anniversary of Norway massacre carried out by Anders Breivik: here.

Anti-Trump protesters banned at US Republican convention?


This video from the USA says about itself:

Johnetta ‘Netta’ Elzie Talks #BlackGirlMagic, Activism and Motivation | ESSENCE

15 January 2016

Go behind the scenes of our special cover shoot with Black Lives Matter activist Johnetta ‘Netta’ Elzie as she opens up about the Black women that inspire her, being an activist and how her mother’s death helped her push forward.

From daily The Independent in Britain today:

Black Lives Matter activists say FBI told them not to protest GOP Convention

Samuel Sinyangwe and Johnetta Elzie of Campaign Zero both say agents attempted to visit them in the past week

Feliks Garcia, New York

Prominent civil rights activists closely associated with the Black Lives Matter movement say members of the FBI have attempted to contact them in the days leading up to the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Samuel Sinyangwe and Johnetta Elzie, co-founders of Campaign Zero, an organisation that aims to end police violence through policy change, both told The Independent that FBI agents made attempts to contact them in recent days.

Mr Sinyangwe, 25, said that he received a phone call on Friday from an unknown number. The caller identified himself as an FBI task force officer.

“He was interested to hear my plans related to the Republican National Convention in Cleveland,” he said. “I told him I don’t have any plans to go to the convention.”

The agent told Mr Sinyangwe, according to his account, that the Bureau had received threats that posed a potential risk and “they are discouraging activists from going to the convention, and he told me not to go.”

Delegates are expected to cast their votes in favour of Donald Trump at the convention, which begins 18 July. Mr Trump‘s campaign has galvanised the enthusiasm of white supremacist groups – such as California Neo-Nazis, who plan on attending the convention. Mr Trump’s outspoken contempt for undocumented immigrants, Muslims, and the Black Lives Matter movement has sparked protests at his rallies across the country.

“I think the FBI should be more concerned with investigating and dissuading the known white supremacists and people with ties to known terrorist organisations from attending the convention, versus trying to intimidate people who are speaking out against injustice,” Mr Sinyangwe said.

In their phone conversation, the agent told Mr Sinyangwe that he attempted to contact him at his San Francisco apartment, where he slid a business card underneath the door – an effort that the activist found disconcerting – and asked for a good time to meet in person.

“He got to my door, which is scary because you have to use a keycard to buzz in through two gates, you have to go up four flights of stairs to get to the door,” he explained. “And somehow [the agent] managed to do that. I’m not sure how.”

The Independent received photo evidence of the business card, but has chosen not to publish it over privacy concerns.

Ms Elzie, too, just missed agents who she said were trying to contact her at her grandparents’ home in St Louis. She was en route from demonstrations in Baton Rouge over the weekend.

“I can’t help but think they were trying to intimidate my grandparents, my family. People who have nothing to do with the protests at all,” Ms Elzie, 26, said. She has been a highly visible figure in the police reform movement since protests erupted in Ferguson, after a police officer shot and killed unarmed teenager Michael Brown in August 2014.

When the agents showed up at her grandparents’ door, they asked where Ms Elzie was and when they expected her to return to the house.

“You know she’s in Baton Rouge, and you know when she’ll be back,” Ms Elzie said her grandmother told the agents, who identified themselves as FBI.

The agents said they had seen an exchange between Ms Elzie, DeRay McKesson, and Mr Sinyangwe on Twitter – although the accounts were apparently impostors. They said they were simply trying to figure out Ms Elzie’s involvement in protest activity surrounding the political conventions this summer.

Her grandmother “started talking to them about open carry laws and how they don’t apply to black people, [and] the cases in Minnesota and Louisiana,” where black men Philando Castile and Alton Sterling were shot and killed by police officers.

Ms Elzie said that the agents did not have cards to pass along to her, but one wrote down their contact information on a piece of paper.

“I’m not giving that to my baby,” her grandmother said, before throwing the paper in the garbage.

Mr Sinyangwe expressed his concern about why he and Ms Elzie would be the focus of FBI surveillance.

“[Campaign Zero] is an organisation that is focused on policy change,” he said. “I’m not sure why the FBI was threatened by that. But it certainly is consistent with a long line of tactics that the FBI has used against black activists in the past.”

The subject of the FBI’s apparent surveillance of activists involved in Black Lives Matter activities came up during President Barack Obama’s “White House Convening on Building Community Trust”, the Washington Post reported. The White House meeting was attended by activists including DeRay McKesson, who co-founded Campaign Zero with Ms Elzie, Mr Sinyangwe, and Brittany Packnett.

Mr McKesson reportedly asked the President to instruct the FBI to stop visiting activists at their homes.

The Intercept reported last year the extent of the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security’s involvement in monitoring of activists involved in the Black Lives Matter movement since it gained national momentum after Ferguson.

Documents obtained from the DHS by the news outlet confirmed that federal authorities had been surveilling protest movement on social media. The report also showed that FBI and DHS officials acknowledged that the protests they were monitoring were “peaceful in nature”.

“I’ve made peace with [the idea that] everything I’ve been doing has been watched since 2014,” Ms Elzie said. “Never have they shown up to my or my grandma’s house.”

Mr Sinyangwe echoed these concerns.

“This is certainly another step in terms of actively trying to dissuade protesters and activists from protesting or attending political events,” he said.

History of lynching in the USA


This video from the USA says about itself:

A History of Lynching

13 July 2016

Dr. Lawrence Brown tells guest host Janaya Khan that recent police shootings of unarmed black men remind him of the 4000 lynchings between 1877 and 1950, the murder of Emmett Till, and bombings of black churches.