CIA torture report, new investigation


This video from the USA says about itself:

Should Bush, Cheney, Rumsfeld & CIA Officials Be Tried for Torture? War Crimes Case Filed in Germany

19 December 2014

A human rights group in Berlin, Germany, has filed a criminal complaint against the architects of the George W. Bush administration’s torture program. The European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights has accused former Bush administration officials, including CIA Director George Tenet and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, of war crimes, and called for an immediate investigation by a German prosecutor.

The move follows the release of a Senate report on CIA torture which includes the case of a German citizen, Khalid El-Masri, who was captured by CIA agents in 2004 due to mistaken identity and tortured at a secret prison in Afghanistan. So far, no one involved in the CIA torture program has been charged with a crime — except the whistleblower John Kiriakou, who exposed it. We speak to Michael Ratner, president emeritus of the Center for Constitutional Rights and chairman of the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights, and longtime defense attorney Martin Garbus.

From the site of the Freedom of the Press Foundation in the USA:

Support the Bureau of Investigative Journalism‘s new project investigating the CIA torture report

January 8, 2015

By Trevor Timm

Today, we’re launching our first crowd-funding campaign of 2015—in support of the Bureau of Investigative Journalism’s new reporting project on the Senate’s recently-released report on CIA torture.

The Bureau, which is partnering with the Rendition Project and long-time torture and secret prisons researchers Crofton Black and Steve Kostas, will be using the Senate’s report as a launching-off point to investigate many of the questions left unanswered due to heavy-handed censorship by the CIA and White House.

While the Senate released the executive summary of the torture report, there are still over 6,000 pages of the main report that remain classified. Even in the summary that was released, many names, dates, and places remain redacted. This project will seek to fill in many of these holes still left in the story.

For example, one of the immediate questions is what has happened to the 119 people who were put through the program? The Bureau has analyzed the list of names in the report and measured them against the people known to have been held in secret prison sites. There is a crossover of about 60 names, which means that about half of the people who went through the program are not known.

Who are they and what has happened to them? This is just one of the questions the CIA torture investigation project will attempt to answer.

We’ve partnered with the Bureau before on a previous crowd-funding project. In 2013 we raised over $25,000 to fund their “Naming the Dead” project, which aims to identify and catalog every single victim—militant or civilian—of American drone strikes in Pakistan.

Since then, the Bureau has become the go-to source on tracking covert drone strikes for media outlets around the world, and we hope this project will have similar success.

Rachel Oldroyd, managing editor of the Bureau said:

The use of black site prisons and the enhanced interrogation techniques were a dark period for the CIA. Years of research by journalists and NGOs brought some of the actions into the public light, but even those people who had dedicated years to investigating the secret program were shocked by what appeared in the summary of the Senate Intelligence Committee’s report. The report has provided a much greater understanding of the program, but it has raised many unanswered questions. It is vital that the public are given a full view of what went on and as importantly what happened to those prisoners who were put through the program.

You can go here to donate.

CIA torture report: An interactive timeline of who’s who in government: here.

The new Republican chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Senator Richard Burr of North Carolina, sent a letter last week to the White House demanding the Obama administration return all copies of the full report on CIA torture whose executive summary was made public last month: here.

Petition initiated by two former UN Assistant Secretaries-General, UN Humanitarian Coordinators for Iraq: Hans von Sponeck and Denis Halliday. On 9 December 2014, the US Senate released its CIA torture report. The investigation confirmed what globally has been known for many years: the US Central Intelligence Agency and US-outsourced national authorities in Europe, the Middle East and elsewhere have been involved in an extensive range of torture applications: here.

WASHINGTON — Five months after the Senate Intelligence Committee released its gruesome report on the CIA’s post-9/11 torture program, someone is finally paying steep professional consequences. Except it’s not the former torturers. Or their superiors. Or even the CIA officials who improperly searched the computers that Senate investigators used to construct the study. It’s the person who helped expose them. Alissa Starzak, a former Democratic majority staffer on the Senate Intelligence Committee, played a critical and controversial role during her time on the panel: She was a lead investigator for the torture report, and was one of two staffers involved in an ongoing feud over damning internal CIA documents obtained by the committee: here.

A federal judge is demanding that the government explain, photo-by-photo, why it can’t release hundreds, and perhaps thousands, of pictures showing detainee abuse by U.S. forces at military prison sites in Iraq and Afghanistan: here.

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