Neofascist anti-refugee demonstration in Rome


This video from Italy is called Bologna Central Station. 2 August 1980. It is about the terrorist bomb attack there then, by Italian fascists like Roberto Fiore. Like the Brabant killers massacres in Belgium, and the Luxembourg secret police’s bomb attacks as revenge for not getting enough taxpayers money for their taste, the Bologna act of terror is often considered to be part of the NATO ‘Operation Gladio’ to create an atmosphere of fear for attacking civil liberties and moving the political spectrum to the right.

Translated from Dutch daily De Volkskrant:

Mussolini slogans in the streets of Rome. ‘We’re starting to recapture our country’

Neofascists in Rome protest to ‘reconquer the streets from the intruders

“You might call all what we do fascism, but I’d rather call it a new force, a forza nuova,” said Roberto Fiore, the frontman of the same-name party Forza Nuova. In the streets of Rome, some two thousand fans of the party marched this Saturday.

By Jarl van der Ploeg, November 5, 2017, 19:55

There he is, Roberto Fiore, the man who lived outside Italy for twenty years after an Italian court convicted him because of involvement in a bomb attack which killed 85 people. At his side are fifteen heavily tattooed men with armbands saying Servizio d’Ordine- paramilitary order troops. Today, they have been elected to protect the big leader of Italian neofascism, and the two thousand followers marching in militarist order behind him in rows of eight through the streets of Rome.

According to Wikipedia, the Italian Court of Cassation defines Forza Nuova as a ‘nazi-fascist formation’. Nevertheless, in 2006 it was part of the ‘center’-right to extreme right electoral alliance, the self-styled ‘House of Freedoms‘, led by convicted now-ex-Prime Minister Berlusconi.

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Italian Lazio football hooligans’ anti-Semitism escalation


This video from Italy says about itself:

SS Lazio supporters: antisemitism

25 October 2017

Anti-semitic graffiti: the backdrop for pictures of Anne Frank, which have been doctored to show her wearing a Roma football jersey. Anne Frank was a Dutch Jewish child who died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945.

This is how some SS Lazio fans chose to express their dedication to their club – and their antagonism to the Italian capital’s rival team – during a recent league game against Cagliari. …

Flirtations with fascism

In a country where “il calcio” is a passion rather than a hobby, [some of] Italy’s most fanatical football supporters, the “ultras”, have long-standing links to fascism. As if to underscore the point, outside Rome’s Stadio Olimpico, home to both Lazio and Roma, stands an obelisk which still bears the inscription “Mussolini, leader”.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV:

Lazio chairman calls synagogue visit after Anne Frank row ‘theater’

Today, 20:41

The Italian football club Lazio is in a controversy again. The club’s chairman, Claudio Lotito, visited a synagogue in Rome after the row about [anti-Semitic] Anne Frank stickers from Lazio fans. During that visit he is said to have qualified it as “theater that is part of routine”.

Lotito went to the synagogue because Lazio came under fire after the anti-Semitic acts by supporters last week. He told the press that the club was working on a new campaign against anti-Semitism. But in the synagogue, Lotito said according to bystanders that the visit had been imposed on him.

The chairman denies the accusations and wants to sue people who maintain that he has made these statements. Evidence against him is that after the visit, the Roman newspaper Il Messaggero published a recording on which he actually appears to speak about a theater play.

Outraged

The Jewish community in Rome reacted furiously to the words the chairman is said to have spoken. A wreath that Lotito brought for his visit to the synagogue was thrown into the water [of the river Tiber].

The question now is how the Italian football federation and authorities will respond to Lotito’s words.

Stickers displaying Anne Frank wearing football jerseys have appeared in Germany as an anti-Semitic provocation by neo-Nazi fans. Dortmund and Leipzig hooligan groups appear to be copying their Italian counterparts: here.

Italian Lazio football hooligans’ anti-Semitism


Paolo Di Canio makes fascist salute

From this blog on 22 May 2011:

Club loses GMB sponsorship after signing football fascist

Sunday 22 May 2011

by Adrian Roberts

The GMB said today that it has decided to end its sponsorship of Swindon Town football club in protest at the appointment of Paolo Di Canio as manager.

GMB said the Italian former player who was named as the new manager of Swindon Town on Friday had previously voiced right-wing views of which it strongly disapproved. …

Mr Di Canio has spoken freely about being a fascist and an admirer of Mussolini. He has faced bans and fines for making the fascist straight-arm salute while playing for Italian club Lazio.

Translated from Dutch NOS TV, 23 October 2017:

Fans of the Italian football club Lazio Roma have left anti-Semitic slogans and stickers depicting Anne Frank in their stadium. The statements were aimed at supporters of city-mate and arch rivals AS Roma, with whom they share the Olympic Stadium of Rome.

The Lazio fans included stickers depicting Anne Frank in an AS Roma shirt and wrote in graffiti ‘Roma fans are Jews’. …

The stickers and slogans were put there during last Sunday’s match, in the part of the stadium where AS Roma’s fanatical supporters always sit at their home matches.

Lazio’s fans never come there. Last weekend they were sitting there because their “part” of the stadium was closed because of racist shouting aimed at some non-white opponent players during a match a few weeks ago.

Lazio Roma’s fanatical supporters are notorious because of their fascist and extreme right-wing sympathies. This season, the UEFA football league already ordered the club to play a European contest without spectators as a punishment for racist sceaming during a European game of a few seasons ago.

From Associated Press, 23 October 2017:

ROME — Images of Anne Frank wearing a Roma jersey were among the anti-Semitic stickers and graffiti left by Lazio fans that were discovered at the Stadio Olimpico on Monday.

It was the latest in a long line of racist or anti-Semitic incidents involving Lazio supporters.

The northern curva (end) of the stadium where Lazio’s “ultra” fans sit was closed on Sunday for the match with Cagliari due to racist chanting during a match against Sassuolo this month.

As a result, Lazio decided to open the southern end and let the ultras in where Roma’s hard-core fans sit for their home matches.

Stadium cleaners found the anti-Semitic stickers a day later.

The Italian football federation is likely to open an investigation, which could result in a full stadium ban for Lazio. …

Lazio’s ultras have long been known for their far right-wing political stances and fascist leanings. During a 1998 derby, Lazio ultras held up a banner directed at their Roma counterparts that read, “Auschwitz Is Your Country; the Ovens Are Your Homes.”

The latest partial stadium ban stemmed from derogatory chants directed at visiting Sassuolo players Claud Adjapong and Alfred Duncan.

“This is not a curva, this is not football, this is not sport. Keep the anti-Semites out of the stadiums,” tweeted Ruth Dureghello, the president of Rome’s Jewish community. …

Also this season, Lazio beat Belgian side Zulte Waregem 2-0 in a Europa League match behind closed doors due to punishment from UEFA for racist chants aimed at a Sparta Prague player in the Roman side’s last continental appearance two seasons ago.

Neglected Egyptian influences on ancient Rome


Roman obelisque, showing a pharaoh with a Roman helmetTranslated from Leiden university in the Netherlands:

Ancient Roman culture more multicultural than thought

The ancient Roman material culture appears to be influenced more by other cultures than was previously assumed. In Rome plenty of elements such as images of Egyptian pharaohs were integrated, says archaeologist Marike van Aerde. PhD ceremony April 23rd.

Multiculturalism was normal

From the Romans from the period of Emperor Augustus (27 BC -14 AD) it was already known that they took elements of Greek and Hellenistic culture. They did this for instance in pottery, jewelry and buildings. The study by Marike van Aerde show that they did this also with aspects of Egyptian culture.

Van Aerde: “They did not only take these elements, they really integrated them.” Eg, Van Aerde found a picture of a pharaoh with a Roman helmet on an obelisk made in Rome. “This integration demonstrates that multiculturalism in Augustan Rome was normal. Egypt was from 30 BC on a Roman province, but the Roman material culture did not treat the Egyptian culture as inferior.”

Illegible hieroglyphics

Van Aerde analyzed nearly two hundred objects unearthed in Rome like pottery and jewelry. Much of this came from museums, including the British Museum. The archaeologist also participated in excavations. She also looked at public monuments and murals. She found many Egyptian figurative scenes and architectural and decorative elements. She found at the Sallustiano obelisk previously undiscovered illegible hieroglyphics. “This was actually a strange multicultural mix, but it did not surprise the Romans probably. They used Egyptian influences as a way to enhance their status. It improved one’s status to be multicultural.”

Terracotta panel depicting the Egyptian goddess Isis and two sphinxes, in a Roman-Hellenistic style

Museums move objects

Roman glass depicting an Egyptian head. Copyright the Trustees of The British MuseumSome Roman objects looked at first sight so Egyptian that people thought that the Romans had taken them from Egypt, Van Aerde says. She included an analysis of a number of fragments of Roman cameo glass, which consist of two or more layers in contrasting colors. They proved to be of Roman manufacture and date from the Augustan period. Van Aerde “Some museums have on these insights moved these objects from the Egyptian to the Roman departments. A perspective shift is needed. We are used to stick a label on everything: this is Greek, this is Roman, this is Egyptian. My research shows that one cannot always make such a distinction.”

(April 23, 2015 – CR)

See also here.

Italian fascists attack refugees


This video is called Mussolini Italy’s Nightmare.

From daily The Independent in Britain:

Racial tensions in Rome: ‘Long live Il Duce’ chants as locals attack immigrant centre with rocks and petrol bombs

Residents in the Tor Sapienza district blame the African and Bengali refugees inside for the ‘insupportable’ levels of street crime in the area

Michael Day

Rome, Wednesday 12 November 2014

Racial tensions have exploded in Rome’s suburbs after locals chanting pro-Mussolini slogans attacked an immigrant holding centre. Police responded with baton charges and tear gas.

Were all of these violent racists really ‘local’? Were some of them not organized fascists, bused in or shipped in from elsewhere in Rome, or in Italy?

UPDATE: Indeed, Italian media have confirmed that. See also here.

Locals are calling for the building in the Tor Sapienza district to be closed after blaming the migrants it houses for “insupportable” levels of street crime in the area.

But the nastier side of the protests were apparent on Tuesday night with hundreds of people chanting: “The blacks have to go,” and dozens more shouting: “Long live Il Duce (Mussolini)”.

The violence in Tor Sapienza began simmering on Monday night with hooded men throwing stones at the Sorriso reception centre in Viale Giorgio Morandi. On Tuesday night the situation escalated dramatically. At around 10pm around 50 people, at the head of a 250-strong crowd, attacked the centre with rocks and petrol bombs. At least 14 people, including four policemen, were injured in the clashes that saw cars and rubbish bins set alight and used as barricades. …

The 36 African and Bengali refugees inside pleaded with police to be led away to safety, according to Corriere Della Sera newspaper. A few hours earlier one of the refugees was attacked in the street.

The ugly developments are the latest sign of a wave of anti-immigration sentiment sweeping Italy, with populist political leaders appearing to profit from, even encourage it. Matteo Salvini, head of the xenophobic Northern League, has seen his ratings rise after appearing in a T-shirt bearing the phrase: “Stop Invasion”.

Mr Salvini said: “Tor Sapienza represents the failure of the state, caused by the stupid politics of that part of the left that allows everyone to do anything they like.”

Even ex-comic Beppe Grillo, who leads the anti-establishment Five Star Movement, appears to have stepped up the anti-immigration rhetoric.

Mr Grillo is the partner of the British UKIP party in the European parliament.

According to some reports, the protests were encouraged by local drug dealers who are unhappy at the high level of policing in the area as a result of the migrant centre.

The violence at Tor Sapienza is the latest in a series of racially-motivated confrontations in the capital in the past few months. In September there were several clashes between refugees and locals in the Corcolle district.