British children abused as drugs guinea pigs

This video from Britain says about itself:

Schoolchildren given experimental drugs without their parents’ consent in 1960s Home Office experiment

22 August 2016

Disruptive boys at Richmond Hill Approved School in North Yorkshire were given an anticonvulsant drug in a trial backed by Home Office doctors.

Children at an approved school were given experimental drugs in a 1960s trial backed by the Home Office, it is reported.

Disruptive boys at Richmond Hill Approved School in North Yorkshire allegedly participated in the trial without their parents’ consent.

They were given the anticonvulsant drug Beclamide for six months in a bid to control their behaviour, National Archive files show.

Home Office doctors also approved a similar trial of the powerful sedative Haloperidol on girls at Springhead Park Approved School in Rothwell near Leeds.

However, it reportedly did not go ahead.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Children used in 60s drugs trials

Tuesday 23rd August 2016

NATIONAL ARCHIVES: Children at a young offenders’ school in the 1960s became unwitting guinea pigs in an experimental drug trial that was approved by Home Office doctors.

National Archive files released yesterday show that disruptive boys at Richmond Hill Approved School in North Yorkshire were given the anticonvulsant drug beclamide, which is no longer widely used, for six months. Dizziness, memory loss and fatigue are some of its common side effects.

The trial went ahead with neither children and parents being consulted. Nor is there any record of outcomes.

Water voles’ comeback in England

This video from England says about itself:

Frustrated Northern Water Vole (Arvicola amphibius) trying to reach some succulent Willow leaves…always just out of reach!

Filmed at Slimbridge WWT.

From daily The Morning Star in Britain:

Water voles returned to Yorkshire Dales tarn

Saturday 20th August 2016

WATER voles are being returned to a lake in the Yorkshire Dales in what is thought to be the highest reintroduction project for the endangered mammal in Britain.

About 100 of the loveable rodents are being returned to Malham Tarn by the National Trust, which says it will be the first time the mammals have been seen since the 1960s when they are believed to have been wiped out by escaped [American] mink from nearby fur farms.

The water vole — inspiration for the character Ratty in Kenneth Grahame’s Wind In The Willows — is Britain’s fastest declining wild mammal.

The trust is releasing the animals, which have been bred in captivity, as part of a major new vision for land management in the Dales, with another 100 to be released next June.

National Trust Malham Tarn ranger Roisin Black said water voles had thrived in the area before.

“By reintroducing water voles to the tarn, we hope to give these rare animals the chance to recolonise the streams in the high Yorkshire Dales.”

Ancient settlement discovery in England

This video from Britain says about itself:

13 October 2014

Archaeology students from the University of Hull have carried out an archaeological dig on the Yorkshire Wolds in East Yorkshire, over the summer of 2014.

Students discovered a great amount of exciting finds at this Iron Age site including a miniature axe, a bone needle, pottery and – perhaps most exciting – an Arras burial.

Hull and its surroundings is a region of superb archaeological wealth. There are few better regions in Britain to study archaeology. The countryside of Eastern Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire contains a wealth of archaeological remains, and its historic centres, such as Hull and Beverley, provide well preserved evidence for the development of medieval townscapes.

For many students, fieldwork is one of the highlights of their degree, and at Hull we regard field teaching as a vital part of our courses.

For more information about studying at Archaeology at the University of Hull visit

From the Hull Daily Mail in England:

Iron Age settlement discovered in Pocklington of ‘national significance’

By HDMJCampbell

March 17, 2016

A 2,500-year-old settlement has been discovered during work on a housing development in Pocklington.

The Iron Age find has been described as of ‘national significance’.

The site includes more than 75 square barrows that contained 180 skeletons from the Arras Culture – a group of people who lived in the region in the Middle Iron Age as far back as 800BC.

The excavation at the David Wilson Homes development has already revealed objects including a sword, shield and 10 spears, as well as more than 360 amber and glass beads, brooches and ancient pots.

A major focus area of the archaeological analysis will concentrate on whether the population is indigenous or migrants from the continent.

The skeletons found are a mixture of men, women and children.

Paula Ware, managing director at MAP Archaeological Practice, said: “To date, the east of Yorkshire has the largest concentration of ‘Arras Culture’ square barrows, and naturally these findings have helped to strengthen this.

“On the whole this is a hugely important discovery and is a fine example of what can be revealed and discovered if house developers and archaeologists work hand-in-hand to reveal the nation’s hidden history.”

David Wilson Homes found the settlement at its Pavilion Square development after it started work in September 2014. The discovery will be officially announced on BBC Four’s Digging for Britain at 8pm tonight.

Peter Morris, development director at David Wilson Homes, said: “These findings are of national significance and could help shape our understanding of the ‘Arras Culture’ and indeed the Iron Age as a whole.

“At present we are still at the early analytical stages of reviewing these findings, however we do understand that this discovery is very rare and of international importance.”

English waterfall flows after centuries

This video from North Yorkshire in England says about itself:

Malham Cove as never seen in living memory

6 December 2015

Unprecedented amounts of rain created this unique phenomenon this morning. Talking to 2 neighbours who are both around 80 and have both lived in Malhamdale all their lives, they have never seen this happen before, and some suggestions are that it could be nearly 200 years since it was last recorded.

The waterfall started again because of rains caused by the storm Desmond. It lasted only for a few hours.

FIRE and rescue services currently responding to the floods in northern England are hampered by the unprecedented cuts they have suffered over the past five years, said the Fire Brigades Union yesterday: here.

English birds news update

This video from Britain is called BTO Bird ID – Goldcrest & Firecrest.

Spurn Bird Observatory from England reports on Twitter today seeing a quail, a hawfinch, a firecrest, a great grey shrike and an olive-backed pipit.

Avocet chicks in England, video

This is a video about an avocet and its chicks, in RSPB Fairburn Ings nature reserve in Yorkshire, England.