After Bermuda petrel, Leach’s petrel, crabs at nest


This video from a burrow in Bermuda, where a young endangered Bermuda petrel aka cahow fledged recently, says about itself:

Leach’s Storm Petrel Invaded by Two Land Crabs – July 3, 2017

7 July 2017

Nonsuch Island‘s misguided Leach’s Storm Petrel was invaded by two land crabs earlier in the week. Watch the crabs make circles around the unwavering bird before leaving the burrow. This is the second year in a row that Leach’s Storm Petrel has taken residence in the Cahow cam burrow after the on-cam chick has fledged. Assuming this is the same bird that visited the empty Cahow cam burrow in 2016—nicknamed “Stormy”—it is the first Leach’s Storm Petrel to have ever been documented nesting in Bermuda!

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here, and learn more about Nonsuch Island’s environs (including the cahow) here.

We’re excited to share a brand new live viewing experience featuring the critically endangered Bermuda Cahow, a kind of gadfly-petrel that nests nowhere in the world except rocky islets off the coast of Bermuda. In the early 1600s, this once-numerous seabird was thought to have gone extinct, driven out of existence by the invasive animals and habitat changes associated with the settlement of the island. In 1951, after nearly 300 years, a single bird was rediscovered, and since then the species has been part of a government-led conservation effort to revive the species.

Young Bermuda petrel fledges


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

Bermuda Petrel Chick Fledges the Burrow! – June 5, 2017

After over 3 months in the nesting burrow, the Bermuda Petrel chick has successfully fledged at about 11 PM on June 5, 2017! The young bird made a grand exit, taking about 25 minutes to tousle up the nest before finally leaving for good. The chick will take wing over the Atlantic Ocean as it learns to fly and survive on its own; he will spend 3 to 6 years alone at sea before returning to the breeding grounds in Bermuda to find a mate and start a nest.

Thanks to our partners at Nonsuch Expeditions and to Senior Terrestrial Conservation Officer Jermey Madeiros of the Bermuda Department of Environment and Natural Resources for providing consistent and thorough updates throughout the breeding season. This collaboration has provided a window into the breeding ecology of one of the world’s most endangered seabirds—the Bermuda Petrel aka Cahow. We hope to see you again in 2018!

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) here.

We’re excited to share a brand new live viewing experience featuring the critically endangered Bermuda Cahow, a kind of gadfly-petrel that nests nowhere in the world except rocky islets off the coast of Bermuda. In the early 1600s, this once-numerous seabird was thought to have gone extinct, driven out of existence by the invasive animals and habitat changes associated with the settlement of the island. In 1951, after nearly 300 years, a single bird was rediscovered, and since then the species has been part of a government-led conservation effort to revive the species.

Bermuda petrel chick visits other chick


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

Visiting Cahow Chick Makes a Surprise Entrance into the Burrow – May 31, 2017

1 June 2017

A second cahow chick made this surprising late night visit to the Cahow cam last night. This young bird had already lost a notably larger amount of its natal down than the on-cam chick. This visit marks the first time that our on-island partners have witnessed a chick from another nest visit a different burrow!

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) here.

We’re excited to share a brand new live viewing experience featuring the critically endangered Bermuda Cahow, a kind of gadfly-petrel that nests nowhere in the world except rocky islets off the coast of Bermuda. In the early 1600s, this once-numerous seabird was thought to have gone extinct, driven out of existence by the invasive animals and habitat changes associated with the settlement of the island. In 1951, after nearly 300 years, a single bird was rediscovered, and since then the species has been part of a government-led conservation effort to revive the species.

Young Bermuda petrel gets adult feathers


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

Bermuda Petrel Chick Gaining Adult Plumage – May 30, 2017

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here

and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) here.

We’re excited to share a brand new live viewing experience featuring the critically endangered Bermuda Cahow, a kind of gadfly-petrel that nests nowhere in the world except rocky islets off the coast of Bermuda. In the early 1600s, this once-numerous seabird was thought to have gone extinct, driven out of existence by the invasive animals and habitat changes associated with the settlement of the island. In 1951, after nearly 300 years, a single bird was rediscovered, and since then the species has been part of a government-led conservation effort to revive the species.

Young Bermuda petrel visited by parent


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

Overnight Visit From Adult on Cahow Cam – May 18, 2017

It’s a full-belly Friday for the Bermuda Petrel chick thanks to a late night visit from this adult cahow on Thursday. Watch here as the two birds congregate in the burrow after reuniting in the nest tunnel. Over the next two weeks, the larger-than-life cahow chick will begin to shed its downy plumage and its first fresh set of flight feathers.

The Cahow Cam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here

and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) here.

A new study finds that birds who freely choose their own mates have more offspring than those which were paired up by researchers in a sort of avian ‘arranged marriage’ — findings that have far-reaching implications for conservation and captive breeding practices: here.

Baby Bermuda petrel born, video


This video says about itself:

3 March 2017

Recap the 24 hours surrounding the Bermuda Petrel chick’s hatch from the egg. Enjoy moments from the first signs of pipping on the egg, the male’s return to the burrow, the hatch, the chick’s first solo bout on the nest, and the chick reaching full fluffball status.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here, and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) here.

Endangered Bermuda petrel baby hatched, video


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

First Solo Moments for New Hatchling Bermuda Petrel, March 2, 2017

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here, and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) here.