Bermuda petrel lays egg, video


This video says about itself:

Nesting Period Begins As Endangered Bermuda Cahow Lays Single Egg – Jan 12, 2018

Take a look inside the nesting burrow of one of the world’s most endangered seabirds, the Bermuda Petrel, as the female lays a single egg, which kicks off a nearly two-month-long incubation period for the on-cam nesting pair.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here.

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Bermuda skink at petrels’ nest


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

Bermuda Skink Takes A Tour Of The Cahow Nesting Burrow – Nov. 30, 2017

Who is that wandering down the tunnel of the nesting burrow on the Bermuda Cahow cam? It’s a Bermuda Skink! These critically endangered reptiles are endemic to Bermuda and one of the rarest lizards in the world. Historically, they also have a long-standing, important relationship with the Bermuda Petrel, as they serve as vital consumers of detritus in the burrows. Read more about the interrelationship here, & skinks here.

Bermuda petrels in love


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

A Look Inside The November Courtship Period Of The Bermuda Petrel – Nov. 21, 2017

Take a deeper look at what’s happening during the November courtship period of one of the most endangered seabirds in the world, the Bermuda Petrel.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) here.

Bermuda petrel webcam working again


This video says about itself:

14 November 2017

Watch a breeding pair of Bermuda Petrels return to Nonsuch Island, Bermuda after months out at sea. They will spend the next few weeks courting and copulating inside their underground nesting burrow.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island’s environs (including the cahow) here.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Bermuda Cahows Return To Nonsuch Island

After spending months foraging over the Atlantic Ocean, Bermuda Petrels (also known as “cahows“) have returned to their breeding grounds on Nonsuch Island, Bermuda, to court, copulate, and spend time with one another in the nesting burrow.

The cam pair’s return signals the onset of the breeding season and an opportunity to follow and learn about the breeding ecology of one of the most endangered seabirds in the entire world. Thanks to our partners at Nonsuch Expeditions, we also have access to expert commentary from cahow biologist Jeremy Madeiros during his weekly check-ups on the adults and chick (like this highlight from November 13).

Breeding pairs typically return to Nonsuch Island every year in early November to court and mate before venturing back out to sea for most of December. The cam will be offline during December for maintenance, but will be back online before the petrels arrive to lay in early January, when the female will return to the burrow and lay a single egg. Stay tuned for another year of discovery in Bermuda!

Bermuda petrel nest 2017 highlights video


This video says aout itself:

Within The Burrow: 2017 Cahow Cam Season Highlights

27 July 2017

Go back inside the Bermuda Petrel nesting burrow and relive all of the highlights from the 2017 Cahow cam season. Watch Shadow, the cam star cahow chick, hatch from the egg and grow from fluffball to fledgling on Nonsuch Island, Bermuda.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island’s environs (including the cahow) here.

After Bermuda petrel, Leach’s petrel, crabs at nest


This video from a burrow in Bermuda, where a young endangered Bermuda petrel aka cahow fledged recently, says about itself:

Leach’s Storm Petrel Invaded by Two Land Crabs – July 3, 2017

7 July 2017

Nonsuch Island‘s misguided Leach’s Storm Petrel was invaded by two land crabs earlier in the week. Watch the crabs make circles around the unwavering bird before leaving the burrow. This is the second year in a row that Leach’s Storm Petrel has taken residence in the Cahow cam burrow after the on-cam chick has fledged. Assuming this is the same bird that visited the empty Cahow cam burrow in 2016—nicknamed “Stormy”—it is the first Leach’s Storm Petrel to have ever been documented nesting in Bermuda!

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here, and learn more about Nonsuch Island’s environs (including the cahow) here.

We’re excited to share a brand new live viewing experience featuring the critically endangered Bermuda Cahow, a kind of gadfly-petrel that nests nowhere in the world except rocky islets off the coast of Bermuda. In the early 1600s, this once-numerous seabird was thought to have gone extinct, driven out of existence by the invasive animals and habitat changes associated with the settlement of the island. In 1951, after nearly 300 years, a single bird was rediscovered, and since then the species has been part of a government-led conservation effort to revive the species.

Young Bermuda petrel fledges


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

Bermuda Petrel Chick Fledges the Burrow! – June 5, 2017

After over 3 months in the nesting burrow, the Bermuda Petrel chick has successfully fledged at about 11 PM on June 5, 2017! The young bird made a grand exit, taking about 25 minutes to tousle up the nest before finally leaving for good. The chick will take wing over the Atlantic Ocean as it learns to fly and survive on its own; he will spend 3 to 6 years alone at sea before returning to the breeding grounds in Bermuda to find a mate and start a nest.

Thanks to our partners at Nonsuch Expeditions and to Senior Terrestrial Conservation Officer Jermey Madeiros of the Bermuda Department of Environment and Natural Resources for providing consistent and thorough updates throughout the breeding season. This collaboration has provided a window into the breeding ecology of one of the world’s most endangered seabirds—the Bermuda Petrel aka Cahow. We hope to see you again in 2018!

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) here.

We’re excited to share a brand new live viewing experience featuring the critically endangered Bermuda Cahow, a kind of gadfly-petrel that nests nowhere in the world except rocky islets off the coast of Bermuda. In the early 1600s, this once-numerous seabird was thought to have gone extinct, driven out of existence by the invasive animals and habitat changes associated with the settlement of the island. In 1951, after nearly 300 years, a single bird was rediscovered, and since then the species has been part of a government-led conservation effort to revive the species.