Bermuda petrel parent feeds chick


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

Petrel Adult Returns to the Burrow And Feeds Chick (edited) – March 8, 2018

Watch this short highlight of a nighttime feeding visit by one of the adult cahows as it returns to the nesting burrow to spend a few hours with its chick. Both parents have been busy foraging over the Atlantic Ocean in an attempt to provide enough food to feed this ever-growing ball of down.

A single foraging trip can take between 3 to 10 days, after which they will return to feed their youngster partially digested pelagic fare like squid, small fish, and shrimp-like crustaceans.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) at http://nonsuchisland.com.

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Baby Bermuda petrel born


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

First Look: Cahow Chick Hatches In The Nesting Burrow! – Mar 2, 2018

The Bermuda Petrel chick fully hatched on the morning of March 2! Here we get the first look at the peeping hatchling—still wet and fresh out of the egg—as the adult female tends to her new arrival.

Over the next few hours, the chick’s downy plumage will dry, and the young bird will begin to resemble a fluffy puffball. According to cahow expert Jeremy Madeiros, the on-cam chick is the 6th cahow chick to hatch on Nonsuch Island, Bermuda so far this breeding season!

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island’s environs (including the cahow) at http://nonsuchisland.com.

Rare Bermuda petrels’ egg hatching


This video says about itself:

Male’s First Visit While Egg Is Hatching—March 1, 2018 | Bermuda Cahow Cam

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows

and learn more about Nonsuch Island’s environs (including the cahow) at http://nonsuchisland.com

We’re excited to share a brand new live viewing experience featuring the critically endangered Bermuda Cahow, a kind of gadfly-petrel that nests nowhere in the world except rocky islets off the coast of Bermuda. In the early 1600s, this once-numerous seabird was thought to have gone extinct, driven out of existence by the invasive animals and habitat changes associated with the settlement of the island. In 1951, after nearly 300 years, a single bird was rediscovered, and since then the species has been part of a government-led conservation effort to revive the species.

This video is called Male’s Second Visit to the Burrow During Hatch, March 1, 2018 | Bermuda Cahow Cam.

Bermuda petrel lays egg, video


This video says about itself:

Nesting Period Begins As Endangered Bermuda Cahow Lays Single Egg – Jan 12, 2018

Take a look inside the nesting burrow of one of the world’s most endangered seabirds, the Bermuda Petrel, as the female lays a single egg, which kicks off a nearly two-month-long incubation period for the on-cam nesting pair.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live here.

Bermuda skink at petrels’ nest


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

Bermuda Skink Takes A Tour Of The Cahow Nesting Burrow – Nov. 30, 2017

Who is that wandering down the tunnel of the nesting burrow on the Bermuda Cahow cam? It’s a Bermuda Skink! These critically endangered reptiles are endemic to Bermuda and one of the rarest lizards in the world. Historically, they also have a long-standing, important relationship with the Bermuda Petrel, as they serve as vital consumers of detritus in the burrows. Read more about the interrelationship here, & skinks here.

Bermuda petrels in love


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

A Look Inside The November Courtship Period Of The Bermuda Petrel – Nov. 21, 2017

Take a deeper look at what’s happening during the November courtship period of one of the most endangered seabirds in the world, the Bermuda Petrel.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) here.

Bermuda petrel webcam working again


This video says about itself:

14 November 2017

Watch a breeding pair of Bermuda Petrels return to Nonsuch Island, Bermuda after months out at sea. They will spend the next few weeks courting and copulating inside their underground nesting burrow.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island’s environs (including the cahow) here.

From the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in the USA:

Bermuda Cahows Return To Nonsuch Island

After spending months foraging over the Atlantic Ocean, Bermuda Petrels (also known as “cahows“) have returned to their breeding grounds on Nonsuch Island, Bermuda, to court, copulate, and spend time with one another in the nesting burrow.

The cam pair’s return signals the onset of the breeding season and an opportunity to follow and learn about the breeding ecology of one of the most endangered seabirds in the entire world. Thanks to our partners at Nonsuch Expeditions, we also have access to expert commentary from cahow biologist Jeremy Madeiros during his weekly check-ups on the adults and chick (like this highlight from November 13).

Breeding pairs typically return to Nonsuch Island every year in early November to court and mate before venturing back out to sea for most of December. The cam will be offline during December for maintenance, but will be back online before the petrels arrive to lay in early January, when the female will return to the burrow and lay a single egg. Stay tuned for another year of discovery in Bermuda!