Bermuda petrel chick’s last day in the nest, videos


This video says about itself:

Last Parental Visit Before Fledge on Cahow Cam – May 28, 2018

Watch highlights of the last parental visit for “Sunny” the cahow chick before he left the nesting burrow on May 28, seemingly for the last time.

This final reunion was complete with back-and-forth vocalizations, multiple feedings, and a long preening session between parent and chick.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions.

You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island’s environs (including the cahow) at http://nonsuchisland.com.

This video says about itself:

Cahow Chick‘s Last Visit To Nest Burrow Before Fledging From Nonsuch Island! – May 28, 2018

After spending much of the day wandering back and forth through the nesting tunnel, “Sunny” the cahow chick left the nesting burrow at around 10:00 P.M. on May 28 and likely has fledged from Nonsuch Island, Bermuda!

Check out these highlights from Sunny’s last visit after 87 days in the nest burrow. The young Bermuda Petrel will spend the next 3 to 6 years learning to forage over the Atlantic Ocean. Once matured, he’ll return to the breeding islands on Bermuda, mate, and attempt to raise his own chicks in a nesting burrow. Good luck out there, Sunny!

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Young birds growing up, from Bermuda to New York


This video says about itself:

Watch “Sunny” the cahow chick receive his leg band during this 10-week health check conducted by Bermuda Petrel expert Jeremy Madeiros and a special guest on May 15!

Thanks to our partners at Nonsuch Expeditions – Bermuda for this nest check video from beautiful Nonsuch Island, Bermuda.

Watch the cam LIVE 👉 AllAboutBirds.org/Cahows

Less than a week remains until this endangered chick is expected to fledge over the Atlantic Ocean.

This video from Georgia in the USA says about itself:

Osprey Chick Self-feeds In Nest For First Time! – May 21, 2018

It’s time to check off another developmental milestone for the Osprey chick in the Savannah nest! Here, the chick can be seen making its first attempt at self-feeding, using its sharply hooked bill to tear away tiny bits of a half-eaten fish that was brought to the nest. This behavior is typically observed at around 40 days post hatch (the chick is 36 days old), and we should expect to see the chick start taking fish directly from parents and feeding on its own as the nestling period progresses.

Three camera views are available—two PTZ cameras and a fixed cam. Mouse over the playhead and click on the little camera with the arrows inside it, then select the camera you’d like to view. Watch live at www.allaboutbirds.org/savannahospreys

This video from New York state in the USA says about itself:

Arthur Swoops in With a Frog, Big Red Follows and Feeds Chicks – May 22, 2018

Watch Arthur swoop in with a frog in his talons and deposit it on the nest. Big Red follows right behind to snatch the snack and feed it to the pair’s hungry chicks. Watch live at allaboutbirds.org/cornellhawks

A Red-tailed Hawk pair has been nesting above Cornell University’s athletic fields since at least the 2012, making use of two different light towers for their nest sites. In 2012 and 2015, they used a tower near Fernow Hall, and in 2013, 2014, and 2016, they used the tower nearest Weill Hall. We installed cameras at both of these sites to get a better look at the intimate behavior of these well-known birds as they raise their young amid the bustle of a busy campus.

Bermuda petrel chick growing up


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

Closeup On Sunny The Cahow Chick – May 18, 2018

Only a couple of weeks remain until Sunny heads out to sea!

The young bird has likely reached his peak mass of over 400 grams, and is now slimming down (334 grams at most recent health check) before fledging. Here, he shows off just how much down has sloughed away in his transformation into a handsome juvenile.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) at http://nonsuchisland.com.

Baby Bermuda petrel update, video


This video says about itself:

Cahow Chick‘s Juvenile Plumage Starting to Show – May 2, 2018

The afternoon following a parental feeding visit in the burrow, the well-fed Cahow chick is beginning to show obvious signs of juvenile plumage development. Get a glimpse at how well the chick’s head feathers have developed around its bill in this clip when it scratches an itch and sloughs away down in front of the camera.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) at http://nonsuchisland.com.

Bermuda petrel parent feeds chick


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

Petrel Adult Returns to the Burrow And Feeds Chick (edited) – March 8, 2018

Watch this short highlight of a nighttime feeding visit by one of the adult cahows as it returns to the nesting burrow to spend a few hours with its chick. Both parents have been busy foraging over the Atlantic Ocean in an attempt to provide enough food to feed this ever-growing ball of down.

A single foraging trip can take between 3 to 10 days, after which they will return to feed their youngster partially digested pelagic fare like squid, small fish, and shrimp-like crustaceans.

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island‘s environs (including the cahow) at http://nonsuchisland.com.

Baby Bermuda petrel born


This video from Bermuda says about itself:

First Look: Cahow Chick Hatches In The Nesting Burrow! – Mar 2, 2018

The Bermuda Petrel chick fully hatched on the morning of March 2! Here we get the first look at the peeping hatchling—still wet and fresh out of the egg—as the adult female tends to her new arrival.

Over the next few hours, the chick’s downy plumage will dry, and the young bird will begin to resemble a fluffy puffball. According to cahow expert Jeremy Madeiros, the on-cam chick is the 6th cahow chick to hatch on Nonsuch Island, Bermuda so far this breeding season!

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows and learn more about Nonsuch Island’s environs (including the cahow) at http://nonsuchisland.com.

Rare Bermuda petrels’ egg hatching


This video says about itself:

Male’s First Visit While Egg Is Hatching—March 1, 2018 | Bermuda Cahow Cam

The CahowCam is a collaboration between the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the Nonsuch Expeditions. You can watch the cam live at http://allaboutbirds.org/cahows

and learn more about Nonsuch Island’s environs (including the cahow) at http://nonsuchisland.com

We’re excited to share a brand new live viewing experience featuring the critically endangered Bermuda Cahow, a kind of gadfly-petrel that nests nowhere in the world except rocky islets off the coast of Bermuda. In the early 1600s, this once-numerous seabird was thought to have gone extinct, driven out of existence by the invasive animals and habitat changes associated with the settlement of the island. In 1951, after nearly 300 years, a single bird was rediscovered, and since then the species has been part of a government-led conservation effort to revive the species.

This video is called Male’s Second Visit to the Burrow During Hatch, March 1, 2018 | Bermuda Cahow Cam.