Squid graveyard in Gulf of California


This video, from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) in the USA, says about itself:

Deep-Sea Discoveries: Squid Graveyard

15 March 2018

On an expedition in the Gulf of California, MBARI researchers discovered a surprising number of deep-sea squid carcasses on the ocean floor. The squid have a fascinating life history, but their story doesn’t end when they die. They become food for hungry scavengers and might change the rhythm of life in the deep sea.

Egg sheets were up to 2.5 m (over 8 feet) long.

The Gulf of California lies between mainland Mexico and Baja. MBARI researchers conducted expeditions there in 2003, 2012 and 2015.

For more information, see here.

Script and narration: Vicky Stein (MBARI Communications Intern)

Video producer: Linda Kuhnz

Music: Amazing Lake

Original journal article: Hoving, H.J.T., Bush, S.L., Haddock, S.H.D., Robison, B.H. (2017). Bathyal feasting: post-spawning squid as a source of carbon for deep-sea benthic communities. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. 284: 20172096.

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Jumbo squid video


This BBC video says about itself:

Jumbo squid caught on camera for Blue Planet II | Earth Unplugged

8 March 2018

Profile on Edith Widder, bioluminescence expert who took enormous steps in understanding animals’ behaviour in the deep sea.

Colourful squid mating


This video says about itself:

13 February 2017

Strange and unusual life inhabits the plankton rich seas of the underwater kelp forests. Watch this short video from BBC natural history series The Blue Planet to see the mating habits of amazing colour changing squid and the weird movements of the aptly named handfish.

Young squid swims, video


This video shows a young squid swimming.

Diver Harry Brummelhuis made this video in the Grevelingen lake near Scharendijke village in the Netherlands.

Giant squid video


This 254 December 2015 video from Japan shows a giant squid swimming.

From VICE.com about this:

December 26, 2015 // 03:09 PM EST

It’s incredibly rare to see a giant squid alive—and it’s even rarer to see it cruising along next to your boat anchor.

The cephalopod was seen cruising Toyama Bay on Japan’s west coast, an area already known for its stunning firefly squid, which glow an iridescent blue and gather in the area to spawn. This squid, however, was an entirely different beast.

Squid eggs found on Texel island beach


European common squid eggs. Photo: Foto Fitis, Sytske Dijksen

Translated from Ecomare museum on Texel island in the Netherlands:

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

In May, not only birds lay eggs. The squid in the North Sea are starting that now as well! Photographer Sytske Dijksen found at the tip of the Texel Hors peninsula a string of European common squid eggs. Cephalopods lay their eggs in spring in strands on the seabed fastening them onto something solid. Yet they will sometimes come loose and wash up on the beach. At this time of the year you have the best chance to find squid eggs on the beach.

Transparent

Sytske last year also found once strands of European common squid eggs. They had already fully developed. Because these egg strings are transparent you could see the squid embryos well. When she put the egg strand into water, the baby squid hatched! The egg strand of this month was not so far yet. One cannot yet recognize squid in it.

Texel in 1940: here.

Rare squid beaches in Belgium


This video, recorded in the Caribbean, says about itself:

Rare Glimpse of a Neon Flying Squid

28 October 2013

The Nautilus team spotted this fast Neon Flying Squid woosh past Argus Cam on their dive to Montserrat.

VLIZ & Natuurpunt (Belgium) reported on Saturday 15 November 2014 (translated):

An European flying squid was found Tuesday on the beach of Nieuwpoort. This squid species lives normally lives far away at sea and visits coastal waters only rarely. A find on a beach is very remarkable. Possibly the extraordinary observation has a connection with the pod of long-finned pilot whales which was spotted yesterday off the coast.

Long-finned pilot whales feed on squid.