Great knot video


This video is about the Siberian bird species great knot.

Siberian accentor video


This is a Siberian accentor video. These North Asian birds are rare vagrants in Europe. Once, last year, one was spotted in the Netherlands.

Dusky thrush video


This is a dusky thrush video. Very rarely, these Siberian birds come to the Netherlands.

Ice library built in Siberia


This video says about itself:

5 February 2017

‘The Ice Library of Wonders’, which consists of 420 “books” on a 200 ton ice sculpture on the coast of Lake Baikal, in Baikalsk, Russia, was unveiled on Sunday.

The walls of the structure are formed from ice blocks, with etchings of more than 1,000 short phrases forming a labyrinth. People from all over the world submitted their dreams online to be carved into the ice, in various languages including English, Chinese, Korean, and Russian.

The library on Baikal is expected to stand until April, and then it’s going to melt.

3-year-old lost Siberian boy survives forest bears, wolves


Hurray! Little Tserin has been found alive! They discovered him earlier this morning after a search in the taiga some 3 kilometres from the village of Khut. Picture: Sholban Kara-ool

From The Siberian Times:

Miraculous survival of 3-year-old ‘Mowgli‘ boy lost in taiga for 72 hours

By The Siberian Times reporter

21 September 2016

Local hero Tserin Dopchut survived ALONE in temperatures nudging zero in forest alive with wolves, bears and dangerous rivers.

The young boy survived by eating his own supply of chocolate, and his good sense in finding a dry makeshift bed under a larch tree. His rescue was personally announced by the head of Tuva Republic, Sholban Kara-Ool, who blogged: ‘Hurray! Little Tserin has been found alive!

‘They discovered him earlier this morning after a search in the taiga some 3 kilometres from the village of Khut.’

A huge search had been launched for the boy who disappeared after playing with dogs near his family home in the forests of Piy-Khemsky district. He may have followed a young puppy into the woodland despite the watchful eye of his great-grandmother – who was in charge of him when he was lost.

More than 100 people including Russian Emergency Ministry‘s rescuers, police, volunteers, as well as close and distant family members joined the frantic hunt. A helicopter overflew a search area of some 120 square km.

Regional emergencies’ chief Ayas Saryglar said: ‘Of course, the situation was very dangerous. The River Mynas is fast and cold. If a small child fell in, it would be certain death.

‘There are wolves and bears in the forest. The bears are now fattening for the winter. They can attack anything that moves. In addition, it is warm during the day, but at night there are even frosts. If we consider that the kid disappeared during the day, he was not properly dressed – only a shirt and shoes, no coat.’

Regional head Sholban Kara-Ool explained: ‘He recognised his uncle’s voice calling his name, and called back. Once his uncle hugged him, the little boy asked if his toy car was okay. He said that he had some chocolate which he ate during the first day.

‘Then he found a dry place under a larch tree and slept there between the roots. The whole village is throwing a party to celebrate his survival. He was given the second name of Mowgli.

‘It is now predicted he will become a rescuer himself, because he showed incredible stamina for his age by surviving for so long alone in these cold woods.’

Searches had gone on day and night. His home village Khut has a population of around 400. There are 63 houses, and locals all joined together to hunt for the missing child.

Doctors say he has suffered no serious damage from his ordeal.

His father serves in the army, and most of his family were gathering in the last hay in the fields when he vanished.

Frozen cave lion cubs discovery in Siberia


This video says about itself:

Extinct cave lions, almost perfectly preserved, discovered in Siberia

27 October 2015

The bodies of two extinct cave lion cubs from at least 10,000 years ago have been recovered in Russia’s Sakha Republic, almost perfectly preserved in permafrost, The Siberian Times reports.

From the Siberian Times in Russia:

WORLD EXCLUSIVE – Meet this extinct cave lion, at least 10,000 years old

By Anastasia Koryakina

26 October 2015

‘Sensational’ find of two cubs, the best preserved ever seen in the world, announced today.

The unprecedented discovery of the ancient predator was made this summer in the Sakha Republic, also known as Yakutia. The cave lions were almost perfectly preserved in permafrost and could be much older.

The Siberian Times is proud to be working with the Academy of Sciences of Yakutia which will introduce the cubs properly at a presentation to the Russian and international media in late November.

Along with the two lions, paleontologists will also show other Pleistocene animals preserved by ice in this vast region, the largest and coldest in the Russian Federation. Among these will be the famous woolly mammoth Yuka, the ‘Oimyakon‘ mammoth, the carcass of a Kolyma woolly rhinoceros, and Yukagir bison and horses.

The cave lions – Panthera spelaea (Goldfuss) – lived during Middle and Late Pleistocene times on the Eurasian continent, from the British Isles to Chukotka in the extreme east of Russia, and they also roamed Alaska and northwestern Canada. The extinct creatures were close relatives of modern Afro-Asiatic lions.

Finds of their remains are rare: today’s announcement about the existence of the pair is coupled with the confident claim that they are the best preserved ever unearthed in the world.

Full details will be given at the presentation in November, including the first results of research into the lions.

Previously, only fragments of carcasses, parts of skeletons and individual bones had been found. Until now, in Yakutia, only skulls, some teeth and bones were unearthed which has prevented scientists having more than an approximate image of the extinct creature.

Like other ancient animals, the cave lion became extinct: research on the two cubs could help to explain why they died out around 10,000 years ago, since the animal had few predators, was smaller than herbivores, and was not prone to getting bogged down in swamps, as did woolly mammoths and rhinos. One theory is a decline in deer and cave bears, their prey, caused their demise.

‘The find is sensational, no doubt,’ said a source close to the discovery. It is known the remains are free of dangerous infections such as anthrax following initial microbiological analysis, but no other significant details or pictures will be released before the presentation.

See also here. And here.

Good Siberian tiger news


This video says about itself:

Siberian tigress Ilona captured on camera a year after release – Part II

28 May 2015

Raw footage taken by a camera trap inside Khingan Nature Reserve in Far East Russia that shows Ilona the Siberian tigress marking her territory. Ilona is one of five orphan tigers that IFAW helped rehabilitate and release back to the wild in May of 2014. A drop-off satellite collar fitted on Ilona provides scientists with critical data to better protect the species. There are less than 400 wild Siberian (aka Amur) tigers left in the wild. To find out more, visit: www.ifaw.org.

From Wildlife Extra:

12 month’s after release ‘Putin’s tigers’ are reported as thriving

One year after five orphaned Siberian tigers were released in the Russian Far East the signs are four out of the five are doing well and have adapted successfully to life in the wild.

Thanks to four camera traps IFAW had donated to the Khingan Nature Reserve, there is now footage of Ilona the tigress looking healthy and marking her territory.

Satellite tracking and camera trap videos show that the rehabilitated orphan tigress continues to thrive in the Russian forests near the Chinese border. By tracking her movements, scientists have learned that she is hunting wolves, deer and wild boar.

“Success stories like Ilona are helping to change the opinion and policy of officials in the Russian Ministry of Natural Resources,” said Maria Vorontsova, International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) Russia director. “There was a general belief that it was impossible to rehabilitate and return orphan tiger cubs back to the wild. IFAW and our partner groups have now proven that it is indeed possible.”

Nicknamed “Putin’s tigers” after President Vladimir Putin’s participation in the release, all but one of the five tigers have successfully adapted to life in the wild. Kuzya, Ilona, Borya and Svetlaya have been tracked and are establishing territories of their own. Ustin was caught after months of wandering near human settlements along the Chinese-Russian border and was ultimately taken to the Rostov-on-Don zoo due to public safety concerns.

The tigress Zolushka (which means Cinderella in Russian) was released in 2013 and was the first to be successfully rehabilitated and reintroduced to the wild. Scientists report that she is doing well and continues to thrive in the Bastak Nature Reserve. It is believed that she found a mate, Zavetny, and may already have given birth to cubs. If the young survive, they will increase the remaining population of approximately 400 wild Amur tigers.